Currently viewing the tag: "What’s on my Woody Plant?"
Gardeners are frequent contributors to our site because of concerns they have differentiating beneficial insects from injurious species. With more and more gardeners attempting to cultivate Cannabis, we started noticing more identification requests from growers. We hope we are offering a public service by responding to our readers’ questions without sensationalizing or taking sides surrounding the legalization of marijuana.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s Eating my Woody Plant?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
July 8, 2017 6:47 PM
I have several woody plants in my garden and I am very concerned with them being eaten by insects.  What is this on my plant?
Signature:  Constant Gardener

Gray Bird Grasshopper Nymph

Dear Constant Gardener,
This is a very young Grasshopper nymph and considering your location, we suspect it is a hatchling Gray Bird Grasshopper.  Though this nymph is quite small, adult Gray Bird Grasshoppers get quite large, with a wingspan well over four inches.  According to BugGuide, they feed upon:  “Apparently a wide variety of plants” and “Apparently overwintering primarily as eggs, hatching over an extended season from spring to late summer (perhaps hatching is related to rainfall events?), and maturing from late spring till late summer or early autumn. Some adults overwinter, and perhaps nymphs too (?).”  There appears to be a notch chewed off the leaf upon which this little Grasshopper is resting, which is a good indication it is feeding off your “Woody Plant”.  Since Gray Bird Grasshoppers are not limited to a single plant species as food, you can probably safely relocate this individual if you are concerned about your “Woody Plant” being eaten.

Gray Bird Grasshopper Nymph

Facebook Comment from Jennifer
LOL…. all I see is pot! lol
oh wait… now I see it! lol

Facebook Comment from Michael
I know, they keep saying that. I’m like, damn, just grow some balls and say marijuana.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Midwest. Elevation 5200
July 5, 2017 8:16 pm
Found this crawling on the stems of woody plants in my garden. Denver, CO. No clue what it is.
Signature: Caitlin

Exuvia of a Buffalo Treehopper Nymph

Dear Caitlin,
We hope helping you identify these immature Treehopper nymphs will benefit your “woody plants”.  First, this does not look like a living insect, but rather it looks like the cast-off exoskeleton or exuvia that is left behind after metamorphosis.  We believe this is a Buffalo Treehopper nymph in the genus
Ceresa, which is pictured on BugGuide, or a closely related species.  Like other members of the order Hemiptera, Buffalo Treehoppers have mouths designed to pierce and suck fluids, and if they are present in large numbers, they may have a significant negative impact on the health of your “woody plant” by depriving the plant of necessary fluids and nutrients for optimal development.

Exuvia of a Buffalo Treehopper Nymph

An immediate Facebook comment from Michael
HAHAHAHA “woody plant.” If that’s not a marijuana plant I’m the Pope.

Daniel,
Thank you for your help identifying these! I’ll have to look into these buffalo tree hopper nymphs. They were very much still alive when I found them on my plants. I have a video of one crawling on the soil after knocking it off the plant to get a better look. Again, thank you for your help and your very fast response!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Maui
June 7, 2016 2:11 pm
Please ID
Thanks!
Signature: Jason

Caterpillar eating Marijuana Leaf

Caterpillar eating Marijuana Leaf

Dear Jason,
This appears to be a Caterpillar eating a Marijuana Leaf.

Yeah I’ve seen plenty of caterpillars eating cannabis flowers… I did not realize they also ate/attacked leaves.
Thanks

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery bug
Location: North Shore, Maui, Hawaii
February 20, 2016 6:54 pm
Aloha folks, You guys were so helpful the last time that I thought I’d give it another go.
I found this guy on the underside of a Cannabis sativa fan leaf (legally grown). I’m not sure if the black spots surround it are fecal matter, but some of the black spots on the bug almost looked like babies. Any help is much appreciated.
Signature: Greg Hansen

Possibly Lace Bug Nymph

Possibly Lace Bug Nymph

Dear Greg,
This is an immature True Bug, and nymphs can be very difficult to correctly identify.  Our initial guess is that this appears to be an immature Lace Bug in the family Tingidae.  According to BugGuide, they:  “Feed mainly on leaves of trees and shrubs, causing yellow spotting and sometimes browning and death of the leaves.”  Beetles in the Bush has some nice images of immature Lace Bugs.  Aloha Arborist Association has a similar looking image of the Cotton Lace Bug, with a list of plant family hosts, but Cannabaceae is not listed.  Perhaps your Lace Bug is a different species, or perhaps the information on plant host families is incomplete.

Thank you so much Daniel!  You are a saint!  I really appreciate your help and expertise.
Greg

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Aphid, we believe

Aphid, we believe

Subject: Just found these on my medical cannabis.
Location: Maine
October 14, 2014 7:19 pm
Hey bug man. Just found these crawling on the pots of my cannabis plants. Look like mites. Larger ones have two pronounced “tails”. You can see one of these tails in the photo below.
I am hoping to get an answer as I haven’t been able to find much online.
Thanks so much for your time.
Signature: Conor

Dear Conor,
We believe this is an Aphid, and you mentioned “larger ones” in your request which means there are also smaller ones.  Aphids reproduce parthenogenically without fertilization, with females giving live birth to offspring, so there are often various sizes of Aphids found together.  Young are nymphs that go through simple metamorphosis, so except for size, different ages look quite similar.  We found much literature online regarding Aphids and the culture of Marijuana, including this page on the I Love Growing Marijuana site.
  Aphids plague many gardeners of roses and plants other than marijuana, and there are many predators of Aphids that are helpful for people who do organic gardening.  Organic nurseries often sell Lady Beetles or Lacewings to eat Aphids, but they are not necessarily native predators.  Rather than introducing predators that might negatively affect the local ecosystem, we would advise trying to encourage native predators.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cannibis Eater?
Location: Central Calif, USA (city of Bakersfield)
July 29, 2014 7:59 pm
We have found these 4 winged “flies” on our cannabis plant. Are they insect or plant eaters?
So far they haven’t eaten me!
Signature: Lynn

Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Hi Lynn,
Your images are very tiny and not of the highest quality, so we enlarged them and enhanced them for posting, but we prefer high resolution, high quality images for identification purposes.  This appears to be some species of Leafhopper or Sharpshooter, and there are many agricultural pests in the family.  Leafhoppers suck the juices from plants, and some species are known to spread viral infections to plants.  Our best guess is that this is a Glassy Winged Sharpshooter,
Homalodisca vitripennis, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, this sp. was introduced into so. California, where it has become a serious threat to viticulture.”  We attempted to locate any documentation on the relationship between Glassy Winged Sharpshooters and Marijuana, and we did find a different species of Sharpshooter feeding on Marijuana on the FloraFinder site.  The University of California Davis Integrated Pest Management site has an excellent article on the Glassy Winged Sharpshooter, and though we scanned it, we could not find a reference to marijuana. 

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

Glassy Winged Sharpshooter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination