Currently viewing the tag: "unnecessary carnage"
Insects are prone to unnecessary slaughter, be it from an overzealous homemaker who doesn't want to see bugs, or from a strapping he-man who is a closet arachnophobe, or from a youngster who likes to torture. At any rate, we get a goodly amount of photos of poor arthropods whose lives ended prematurely. In an effort to educate, we present Unnecessary Carnage. This page is not intended for the squeemish.

Subject:  What kind of bug is this? I was sitting on my patio at night and it flew into my screen door.
Geographic location of the bug:  Las Vegas
Date: 09/20/2021
Time: 11:59 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Would like know what it is never saw one in Las Vegas.
How you want your letter signed:  Veronica Robinson

Unnecessary Carnage of a Beneficial Preying Mantis

Dear Veronica,
The beneficial Preying Mantis in your image appears to have expired after being sprayed with insecticide, a textbook example of Unnecessary Carnage.

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Borrego Springs
Date: 09/09/2021
Time: 11:16 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I am house/pet sitting in this area which I’m fairly new to. This bug was inside the house.
How you want your letter signed:  Babs

Solifugid

Dear Babs,
This is a predatory Solifugid and it appears dead with its guts showing indicating it was likely squashed.  Solifugids do not have venom or poison, so they pose no threat to humans.  It is possible to get bitten and a large individual might draw blood, but again, they pose no threat to humans.

Subject:  Long yellow legged insect
Geographic location of the bug:  New York
Date: 08/11/2021
Time: 10:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman, at 10:30pm saw this bug flying across my living room on 8/11/21. Did not want to harm it but had to call in the hubby  to settle the matter. What is this long yellow legged creature?
How you want your letter signed:  Michelin

Unnecessary Carnage of a Tree Cricket

Dear Michelin,
We find the image you submitted illustrating the Unnecessary Carnage of  a harmless Tree Cricket to be oddly beautiful, but living Tree Crickets are even more beautiful.

Oh no!
Thank you Dan for letting us know that this was indeed a good creature, next time we ever encounter another one we will make sure to let it flourish on our magnolia tree.
Best,
Michelin

We are happy to hear that Michelin.  Tree Crickets are quite musical.

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  West Chester, PA
Date: 08/07/2021
Time: 10:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I saw this bug today, and I have never seen it before. It flew very strangely compared to other bees. Does it sting?
How you want your letter signed:  Julia

Yellowjacket Hover Fly

Dear Julia,
This is a Yellowjacket Hover Fly, also known as a Good News Bee.  Hover Flies neither sting nor bite, however, they do mimic the stinging Yellowjacket to discourage predators
.

Yellowjacket Hover Fly appearing dead

It is somewhat troubling to us that this harmless creature is alive in one image, and appears dead in the second.  It is our mission to educate the public about insects and other things that crawl, and since the Yellowjacket Hover Fly is harmless, we consider this to be an example of Unnecessary Carnage.

 

 

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Texas
Date: 06/25/2021
Time: 10:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this on its back and decided to spray it as it looks mean! It has a long needle-like nose and long thin wings, only two though.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, Russell

Green Eyed Robber Fly

Dang Russell.  That is one large Robber Fly.
We are quite confident you encountered the Green Eyed Robber Fly,
Microstylum morosum, and according to Zoo Safari USA: “Very little is known about this species, but it is the largest of the Robber Flies in North America.”  Here is a BugGuide image.  You might want to contact your local natural history museum to see if they want the specimen.

Subject:  What is this insect?
Geographic location of the bug:  Christchurch New Zealand
Date: 10/11/2019
Time: 08:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’m unsure what this is, at first I thought it was a blowfly so I swatted it and then I noticed the yellow colouring on its back and was worried it may be a bee of some sort
How you want your letter signed:  Isaac Thomas

Three Lined Hover Fly

Dear Isaac,
This is a harmless Three Lined Hoverfly,
Helophilus seelandicus.  According to Landcare Research:  “Attracts attention because of its noisy flight.  Important pollinator of flowers.  Larvae are rat tailed maggots which live in liquid containing rotting plants or animals.”