Currently viewing the tag: "unnecessary carnage"
Insects are prone to unnecessary slaughter, be it from an overzealous homemaker who doesn't want to see bugs, or from a strapping he-man who is a closet arachnophobe, or from a youngster who likes to torture. At any rate, we get a goodly amount of photos of poor arthropods whose lives ended prematurely. In an effort to educate, we present Unnecessary Carnage. This page is not intended for the squeemish.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pumpkin-Wasp-Bee-Hornet???
Location: Belle River, Ontario, Canada
July 17, 2017 7:58 am
A most unusual hornet looking bug was in the area while I was working and I have no idea as to what it is. The main body was orange and black and legs were orange as well. It would be great to know what this is and possibly where it comes from as I have never seen anything like it in this area.
Thank you.
Signature: Jerome

Great Golden Digger Wasp

Dear Jerome,
The Great Golden Digger Wasp is a non-aggressive, solitary wasp found across North America.  They are a harmless species.  Unless you found it already dead, we are going to have to tag this as Unnecessary Carnage and we hope you will be more tolerant if you have future encounters with Great Golden Digger Wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help!!!
Location: Miami, FL
July 14, 2017 8:08 pm
I have these bees in a crevice under a window ledge outside that is about 1.5 feet off the ground. The bees have been there since about beginning of June and fly around all day near the front door. I think they are honey bees. I’m not sure. I sprayed it crevice tonight with a foaming pesticide and a little while later I found a total of 4 over the course of two hours flying inside the house!
Signature: I bee worried

Honey Bee

Dear I bee worried,
This is indeed a dead Honey Bee.  Wild Honey Bees often form a new hive in protected areas of homes.  If you have a Honey Bee hive under your window ledge, you are not going to solve the problem with foaming pesticide.  You should contact a local bee keeper who will come and remove the hive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle
Location: Broken Arrow, OK
June 17, 2017 7:26 am
A neighbor of mine posted something about this bug. None of us knows what it is and I was wondering if you knew? I tried to google it but no luck….
Signature: Penny Roberts

Virginia Metallic Tiger Beetle

Dear Penny,
We began our research on identifying this Tiger Beetle with a web search that led us to the Beetles in the Bush site, where there are images of the Florida Metallic Tiger Beetle posted, and they look so similar to the individual in your images, that we suspected they might be in the same genus, so we searched the genus 
Tetracha on BugGuide which led us to the Virginia Metallic Tiger Beetle, Tetracha virginica, which is featured in some nice BugGuide images.  According to BugGuide:  “Crepuscular or nocturnal. Hides during day under stones, rocks, etc., especially near water. Attracted to lights at night” and it is described as “Tiger beetle shape. Glossy green body and elytra, distinctive compared to Cicindela species. Legs are a contrasting tan. Elytra lack maculations. Compared to other members of this genus, no light crescent-shaped markings at apex (tip) of elytra. Note also large size–largest North American member of this genus.”  Tiger Beetles are fierce hunters that pose no threat to humans, and for that reason, we are tagging this entry as Unnecessary Carnage.  We hope you inform your neighbor that these beautiful beetles, much prized by collectors for their gorgeous metallic colors, are beneficial in the hope that future encounters to not end with a death.  As an aside, though named the Virginia Metallic Tiger Beetle, this species is actually reported as far west as Texas and Oklahoma based on BugGuide data.   

Virginia Metallic Tiger Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: GRANNYS BATTLE !
Location: Orange ,CA.
May 26, 2017 7:02 am
Hello there bugman
So my mom and daughter thought this flying bugger was a simple house fly at first until they WHACKED it with the fly swatter ,The thing took a good wallop but didnt phase it just angered it ! LOL after about 20 minutes of running around the house being “chased” by this guy they were finally able to take him out . Not sure if its a wasp or what but we do have a honey bee nest out back in an old boat that every year they come back to ,Never have seen this kind of bee,wasp,hornet whatever it is but if you can identify it that would be AWESOME cuz now my 5 year old daughter has the dead bug in a jar that she wants to take to school and share with her class lol so here i am
PLEASE HELP sincerly justin keefe
Signature: Justin Keefe

Honey Bee

Dear Justin,
This is a beneficial Honey Bee.  Without Honey Bees, the cultivation of apples, almonds and avocados as well as many other important food crops would be seriously, negatively impacted.  There are people who believe farming as we know it might not exist without Honey Bees.  If your family is troubled by having a Honey Bee nest in your old boat, you should contact a local bee keeper who will happily remove the hive for you.  While we acknowledge that removing a Honey Bee from the home without killing it might prove a challenge as a threatened Honey Bee will sting, we strongly recommend attempting to capture it in a wine glass or other glass and slipping a post card under the rim so it can be safely transported outdoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Furry large fly?
Location: Washington state
May 18, 2017 6:34 pm
This bug circles people really fast, especially hiking in Seattle area, spring through summer. No interest in dog or horse. Hasn’t tried to bite me just circles like crazy. Really loud buzzing, size of a nickel. Sometimes the body is yellow instead of orange. Super fuzzy body. What attracts it, seems like scented deodorants? Hair shampoo? I just want it to let me be.
Signature: Make it stop!

Bumble Bee Carnage

Dear Make it stop!,
We cannot, but you obviously did.  This appears to be a beneficial native Bumble Bee, perhaps the Hunt’s Bumble Bee that is pictured on BugGuide, and it appears to be very dead.  By your own admission, it does not bother dogs nor horses, and it seems the worst thing you can accuse it of is of buzzing really loud and flying in circles.  We have no choice but to tag this as Unnecessary Carnage and we would strongly urge you to refrain from hiking if you can’t deal with the wildlife.

Facebook Comment from Cindy
This might very well be a troll. Even if it isn’t, yes that’s a horrible thing to do. Poor Bee. 🙁

Facebook Comment from Heather
What kind of a**hole kills a bumblebee?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fearsome bug in Cambodia
Location: Sihanoukville, Cambodia
April 30, 2017 9:06 pm
I have seen this bug in my bathroom (both times it was I the bathroom)) acouple of times in my home in Sihanoukville, Cambodia. The time of year is March and April. As it looks fearsome, I would like to know anything I can about it.
Signature: Al

Whipscorpion

Dear Al,
Despite its fearsome appearance, this Whipscorpion is harmless since it has no venom, however its mandibles might have been capable of biting prior to its untimely demise, which is why we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.  Whipscorpions are shy, nocturnal hunters that will help keep your bathroom and other rooms free of Cockroaches, Spider and Scorpions, and other unwanted visitors, which is why they are frequently tolerated in tropical countries.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination