Currently viewing the tag: "unnecessary carnage"
Insects are prone to unnecessary slaughter, be it from an overzealous homemaker who doesn't want to see bugs, or from a strapping he-man who is a closet arachnophobe, or from a youngster who likes to torture. At any rate, we get a goodly amount of photos of poor arthropods whose lives ended prematurely. In an effort to educate, we present Unnecessary Carnage. This page is not intended for the squeemish.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Milkweed bug?
Location: Roma, Queensland
February 7, 2017 6:45 am
Hi, im working in australia at the moment and this guy got into my boilersuit and bit my leg! The closest thing i could find on google was a large milkweed bug but it doesnt look exactly like the pictures, and google says they dont bite? Unfortunately my colleague stepped on him before i could take a picture of him and take him outside. I also seen a spider that one of the locals told me is a red back spider, but again it doesnt look like the pictures on google. Just curious as we dont have any of these guys back home and wouldnt want to tell people its the wrong bug!
Signature: Jon

Assassin Bug

Dear Jon,
We feel confident that this is a male Ground Assassin Bug in the genus
Ectomocoris, but the Brisbane Insect site only has images of wingless females and we only have images of wingless females in our archive.  We located a thumbnail of a male Ground Assassin Bug on the Atlas of Living Australia, but we cannot find the page with the full sized image.  We also located these images of mounted specimens on the Swedish Museum of Natural History.  The Spider is NOT a Redback

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this
Location: North Carolina
January 21, 2017 9:41 pm
Found this bug in my bedroom in North Carolina
Signature: Reggie

House Centipede Carnage

Dear Reggie,
This is a beneficial House Centipede, and though they are considered harmless, they can be quite frightening looking to folks that are predisposed to fear insects and other lower beasts.  We probably get more House Centipede carnage images submitted to our site than any other creature, though if Cicada Killers were found year round, they might take the lead in that unenviable position.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentifiable beetle
Location: Rotonda, FL. 33947
January 28, 2017 10:03 am
Found this in my screened front entryway. Killed it with bug spray as we’re new to FL and unsure what bugs are good and what are not. Cannot find anything similar in searches. No identifying features except large carapace and brush-like front legs. Thank you for any information.
Signature: Deb Svirtunas

Mole Cricket Carnage

Dear Deb,
This is a harmless, subterranean Mole Cricket.  We hope the next individual you encounter lives.

Thank you very much, Daniel, for your prompt and informative response! We will ensure that any future encounters will be harmless removal outside where he/she may continue their job as God intended.  Have a great afternoon and Go Patriots!!  Deb

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornet
Location: graham, nc
December 10, 2016 2:42 pm
Hi,
I live in Graham, NC and saw these HUGE hornets at my new house in the country. They were swarming around the cable box, but I never saw any nest. They didn’t seem too aggressive, but sadly one had to go once it got in the house. Should I be worried about this one?
Thanks!
Signature: may

Good News Bee: Unnecessary Carnage

Good News Bee: Unnecessary Carnage

Dear May,
Though it resembles a Hornet, this Good News Bee is actually a Yellow Jacket Hover Fly, a harmless insect that does a very good job of mimicking a stinging insect.  Now that you know it is harmless, we hope you attempt to relocate any additional Good News Bees that enter your home.  An upturned glass and a postcard are great tools for the relocation process.  Since they are considered not only harmless but beneficial, since adult Good News Bees are pollinators and larvae eat destructive insects in the garden like Aphids, we are tagging this posting with Unnecessary Carnage in our continuing efforts to educate the web browsing public to the benefits of the lower beasts.

Thank you! Ugh, I feel terrible now that this one was killed, but I will be better to them in the future. How can you tell easily that this belongs to hover flies?

Flies belong to the order Diptera, which according to BugGuide is:  “Greek ‘two-winged’ (the name dates back to Aristotle, who noted the difference from typical four-winged insects.”  Flies have only one pair of wings while most insects have two pairs of wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WHAT ARE THESE THINGS!?
Location: Tampa, Florida
September 10, 2016 8:05 pm
Ok, so I am a little freaked out because I keep seeing these bugs suddenly and I have never seen them before. I have lived in Florida all of my life and suddenly in the last month or so, this bug keeps showing up. It doesn’t look so scary in the photo, but I will tell you that these bugs do not kill easily. And what I mean by that, is that I have to use a hammer smashing this bug into the tile floor to kill it. No amount of crushing it will kill it unless I use something like a hammer. That is freaking nuts! So yeah, they look kind of like a mosquito, but this thing is hard as a rock. The photo I am submitting makes this thing look like nothing has really happened to it and this was after using a hammer on it. Please help! I would really like to know what these things are and if I can take any measures to get them out of my house and out of my life!
Signature: Thank you!!!!

Ensign Wasp Carnage

Ensign Wasp Carnage

This is an Ensign Wasp, and we are going to unashamedly tag this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.  Ensign Wasps parasitize the oothecae or egg cases of Cockroaches, so we have to include them in the beneficial insects camp.  Large populations of Ensign Wasps in your home means that you must have Cockroaches to support the population.  If you prefer Cockroaches in your house to Ensign Wasps, then by all means, hammer away.

Thank you so much for getting back to me!
So I don’t need to worry about these bugs bitting me or anything?

Though we have always maintained that Ensign Wasps do not sting humans, we believe there is a comment somewhere on our site claiming that a sting occurred.  Suffice to say that they are NOT an aggressive species, though handling one might result in a sting.  They do NOT bite.  According to Owlcation:  “The Ensign Wasp (Evonia appendigaster) looks a bit like a black spider with wings. Many people, upon seeing one, might assume that it will sting, but in fact it is totally harmless.  The Ensign Wasp is actually a beneficial insect because it is a parasite of cockroaches and hunts for their egg-cases, which are known as oothecae. The female wasps lay their eggs in them and the wasp larvae eat the cockroach eggs.”  The Galveston County Master Gardeners website has a nice page devoted to beneficial species and stinging is NOT mentioned.

I can’t tell you how much this means to me to get this info.. It is my goal to live in harmony with the earth and its population, even those bugs that freak me out. I really wanted to call an exterminator, but I am thinking it is best to just leave things be. Is there a way for me to donate to you via paypal? Thank you again!
Andrea

That is very kind of you Andrea.  There is a Paypal link on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify the big bug in picture
Location: north Georgia mountains
August 26, 2016 6:03 am
Good morning. A friend took the attached photo earlier this week. and has given his explicit permission for me to do with it what I want, including sharing it/using it. Our community is in the North Georgia mountains, and my friend’s home is located in the lower elevations of the neighborhood, adjacent to the golf course.
There have been a lot of yellow-jackets in the area this year, so we’re happy that something might be attacking them. But, what in the heck is that big something?
Thanks in advance for any assistance you are able to provide.
Signature: Edie

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Yellow Jacket

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Yellow Jacket

Dear Edie,
The predator in the image is a Red Footed Cannibalfly, a large species of Robber Fly.  While Robber Flies might bite a person who carelessly tried to handle one, they are not aggressive towards humans.  The unnatural position of the wings of the Red Footed Cannibalfly in your image is somewhat disturbing, leading us to speculate that it is no longer alive and possibly the victim of Unnecessary Carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination