Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown “insect” under water
Geographic location of the bug:  Madison county Kentucky USA
Date: 04/05/2019
Time: 01:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found these in a communications manhole. They seem to have 6 legs per side for a total of 12.
How you want your letter signed:  Ian

Isopods

Dear Ian,
These are sure puzzling creatures, and we cannot devote the time we would like to their identification at this moment.  We are posting your images and we hope to hear from our readers while we do additional research.  Are you able to provide any information on their size?

 

Isopods

Update:  We suspected these were Crustaceans.  We wrote to Eric Eaton who wrote back “Some kind of amphipod, not sure beyond that as they are not insects nor arachnids.”  In researching Freshwater Isopods, we found these image of a cave dwelling Isopod on Encyclopedia of Arkansas, and since there are numerous caves in Kentucky, we speculated that it would be easy for some cave species to survive in a sewer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green hornworm (?) from Ecuador
Geographic location of the bug:  Jorupe Reserve, near Macará, Loja, Ecuador (near the Peruvian border)
Date: 04/02/2019
Time: 07:55 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This photo was taken at the Jorupe Reserve (same location as my Eumorpha triangulum earlier today) on March 9.  This caterpillar is at least 3 inches long and very fat.  As we walked along the trail, these were falling out of certain trees to the ground.  I’m thinking it’s another Sphingidae/Hornworm.
How you want your letter signed:  David

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Dear David,
We agree that this does appear to be a Hornworm in the family Sphingidae, but it is not possible to discern a caudal horn due to your camera angle.  Can you confirm a caudal horn?  Can you provide an image that shows the horn?  We will continue to research this matter and hopefully provide you with an identification.  We will once again contact Bill Oehlke to take advantage of his expertise.

Daniel, here are my only other shots of this caterpillar, all the same individual.  I see no horn.
By the way, I have reduced the resolution on these to make it easier to send them over my inadequate internet connection.  Let me know if you need higher res.

Thanks for your help.

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Thanks for sending additional images David.  We have forwarded them to Bill Oehlke and are still awaiting a response.  We would not want to rule out that this might be a Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the family Saturniidae.

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar

Daniel, I am pretty sure it is Caio harrietae.
Caio harrietae (Forbes, 1944) (Arsenura).
Do I have permission to post this image and the Eumorpha triangulum image?
Bill Oehlke

Ed. Note:  See our archive for images of adult Caio harrietae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar ID required
Geographic location of the bug:  Malaysia
Date: 03/23/2019
Time: 09:33 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A solitary caterpillar found on a post in Malaysia. I think it’s some sort of tussock moth but an ID would be appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Pat

Tussock Caterpillar

Dear Pat,
We agree that this is probably a Tussock Moth Caterpillar from the subfamily Lymantriinae, but we are unable to provide you with a species identification at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Chehalis, Washington
Date: 03/25/2019
Time: 08:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is the second time I have found one of these on my property. This one was on my concrete front porch.  It is in a quart canning jar in photo.
How you want your letter signed:  Blonder

Cockroach

Dear Blonder,
This is a Cockroach, though we do not believe it is one of the species that commonly infests homes and businesses.  We will attempt to determine its species, or at least its genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Pacific Northwest
Date: 03/18/2019
Time: 08:31 PM EDTYour letter to the bugman
Early spring: I found many of these inside the rotting stem of my artichoke plants. They’re less than 1/2 inch on length, are legless,  and move a little like a caterpillar but with much less flexibility.
How you want your letter signed:  a gardener

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem

Dear Gardener,
This is most certainly the larva of a Fly, generally called a Maggot, and our best guess at this point is that it is the larva of
Terellia fuscicornis, a species of Fruit Fly pictured on BugGuide that feeds on artichokes.  Alas, we have not been able to locate any images of the larvae.  Bug Safari has additional images of the adult Fly.

Maggot found in Artichoke Stem

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Dragonflies
Geographic location of the bug:  Hungary
Date: 03/05/2019
Time: 10:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I am giving a talk on Monday and would like to include the attached photographs but have been unable to identify the species as I have found most of the websites unhelpful.
You have been very helpful in the past and I would much appreciate your assistance.
How you want your letter signed:  William Smiton

Mating Dragonflies

Dear William,
Are you from Hungary or did you take these gorgeous images while on holiday?  Do you speak Hungarian?  Which sites did you not find helpful?  We did a web search for the order Odonata and Hungary and quickly found szitakotok, a site dedicated to Hungarian Dragonflies.  The site is difficult to navigate, and it loads slowly, but it seems quite comprehensive.  Did you check that site?

Dragonfly

Your third image reminds us of the North American Common Whitetail, so we decided to see if there were any members on szitakotok from the genus Plathemis, but there are not.  Perhaps one of our readers who is adept at Dragonfly identification will provide input.  Perhaps if you have not yet checked szitakotok, you will have luck self-identifying.  Please let us know if you determine any identities.

Dragonfly

I’m from Northern Ireland and took the photos on a birdwatching trip. I’ve tried various websites including the one you recommend but it doesn’t identify the dragonflies in the photographs. Daniel has been very helpful in the past so hope to hear from him.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination