Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs in Costa Rica
Location: Costa Rica
March 10, 2015 6:41 am
We saw these bugs on the side of the road in Manzanillo (Caribbean coast) in Costa Rica a few days ago (early March). I asked Tracie in Drake Bay as we did a tour with her but she said they are nymphs and without the adults around the chance of identification is slim. She told us to contact you. Any idea what they could be ? Thanks so much.
Signature: Sonia

Immature Hemipterans

Immature Hemipterans

Dear Sonia,
Tracie is correct, kind of.  Nymphs are often difficult to identify conclusively, however, these nymphs are very distinctive in color and markings.  Our initial gut instinct is that they are in the family Coreidae, and that they remind us somewhat of members of the genus
Thasus.  Our initial search did not provide any visual matches.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.  Cesar Crash may be able to come to our rescue on this.

Immature Hemipterans

Immature Hemipterans

Thanks so much for your quick reply, Daniel.. Please do let me know if you find out more. We thought they were very distinctive too and find it all quite exciting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Molting aquatic life form
Location: Lucas County, Ohio
March 6, 2015 12:37 pm
One of my volunteers found this insect (I think), molting in her collecting tub of vernal pool water in mid-July in NW Ohio. The pool is isolated, nowhere near a creek, pond, or lake. The attached pictures are 20x if I remember correctly (other option is 40x) and were taken in the field. We watched it struggle free of the larval skin under the microscope. The skin shape reminds me of a damselfly nymph. Could this possibly be the pupal form? I’ve tried to count legs of both larvae and the skin, magnify head shape etc, but I am still stumped.
Signature: Eileen

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

Dear Eileen,
We cannot say for certain what creature this is, but we have some thoughts.  If the tub collected rain water, any insects present would need to have either developed from an egg laid by a flying insect or been transported from another water source on the bodies of a bird or other creature that visited the pool.  This creature reminds us somewhat of an aerial view of a mosquito tumbler, the pupal form.  Most images online are side views, but BugGuide does contain an aerial view that looks similar.  We hope someone more skilled at aquatic identifications can provide some input.

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for the reply. This was found in a collecting bucket, about a
quart of water taken from a huge vernal pool that has a wild egg bank
in the bottom of the pool when it is dry. I agree, it does resemble a
top view of a mosquito tumbler. It was definitely squirming out of the
nearby exoskeleton though, and the legs on that shell have spurs on
them – not found on mosquito larvae. It’s always possible that larvae
can get caught up in other exoskeletons as they’re wriggling about,
but in the one picture there are definite legs on the new critter.
Thanks very much for trying. I use this as an example for my
volunteers – there is always something new to be found in a vernal
pool and it can’t always be identified!
Eileen

Aquatic Bug

Aquatic Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pumpkin Beetle
Location: Thailand, Chiang Mai
March 2, 2015 8:01 pm
Hello Daniel,
thank you and you are right after searching for the name.
Here is something that might interest you:
This is an “orchid lover” … a real pest at orchid nurseries here in Thailand.
People call it “Pumpkin beetle” (Aulacophora abdominalis) but it isn’t one. Look at black legs and antennae.
And it’s neither Stethopachys formosa or Lema pectoralis, but close to them.
The bug and its larvae love orchid flowers, especially these of the Aeridinae group (Vanda, Rhynchostylis, Seidenfadenia and all of their hybrids), Dendrobium and Spathoglottis.
Regards … Ricci

Mating Leaf Beetles

Mating Leaf Beetles

Hi Ricci,
In the future, please submit new requests by using our standard submission form.  We realize it is easier for you to just attach additional images to a previous response, but it makes our postings so much easier if we are able to use the format of our submission form.  Thanks so much for sending us images of two phases of this Leaf Beetle.  We haven’t the time to research its identity this morning, but we are posting the images and we will provide additional feedback at a later time.
  We hope the eggs are not exported with the orchids because the introduction of a major orchid pest can wreak havoc on orchid nurseries around the globe as orchids are such a popular gift item.

Leaf Beetle Larva

Leaf Beetle Larva

Update:  March 4, 2015
We did locate this similar search for an identification on the Dokmai Dogma Drama In The Orchid Nursery posting.

Hi Daniel,
the orchid nurseries that export their plants use so much poison (most of it is forbidden in Europe) … no egg or Beetle will survive this.
When I asked a friend who own a nursery about this beetle, she answered:
“For bug (Pumpkin beetle) use Dicrotophos and Sticking Agent spray 5 days per time. And larva use Abamectin and Sticking Agent.”
Abamectin and Dicrotophos are highly toxic and dangerous for the environment.
Btw.:
– In Australia the black and yellow Dendrobium beetle (Stethopachys formosa) is a pest in orchid nurseries.
– Lema pectoralis has been reported from orchid nurseries in Thailand.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Long Fine Webs + Egg clusters on trees. Los Angeles.
Location: Whittier, Los Angeles
February 22, 2015 12:09 pm
Hello,
I live in the Whittier area of Los Angeles. I’ve noticed long fine webs and occasional egg clusters on my deciduous trees branches, and a young bougainvillea. The bougainvillea was eaten down to the stems, not sure if related.
Webs span between branches, and are usually single strand. The webs can become come somewhat more complex in crook of branches or near buds. The small white eggs can be singles, but I have seen long clusters of 1 dozen or so. I never notice any insects present.
My trees are young, between 1-4 years old. Not sure if I should be concerned, or if I should treat. Don’t want to let it get out of hand if its dangerous to my trees. FYI – trees are various fruits, and several Mexican Redbud.
Any insight would be helpful. Thanks.
Signature: Erin

Web with Eggs

Web with Eggs

Hi Erin,
Webs are generally associated with spiders, but your web and eggs are not related to spiders.  Many caterpillars spin silk, but caterpillars do not lay eggs, so we don’t think this is related to a Moth.  We will post your images and continue to research your submission.

Web with Eggs

Web with Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large spider from Ecuador
Location: Vilcabamba, Ecuador
February 1, 2015 3:28 pm
Hey I recently found this spider hiding in my towel! Have tried looking at different possibilities but none seem to fit the bill. It was found in September, in Vilcabamba , Ecuador. Someone suggested it was called Jamaco by the natives here, a type of bird-prey spider, but im not convinced. Any help would be greatly appreciated to satisfy my curiosity of who this visitor was!
Signature: Etienne

Tarantula

Tarantula

Dear Etienne,
This is some species of Tarantula, but we are not certain of the species.  The Spinnerets on the tip of the abdomen are especially pronounced in your individual.  According to Tarántulas de México:  “Spinnerets are movable structures located in the rear of the opisthosoma, and are in charge of expelling and placing the silk web produced by four internal glands. As the silk passes through the ducts and reaches the spinnerets, its molecular structure changes and becomes very resistant. It comes out through small tubes located by the hundreds in the lower part of the spinnerets; then the silk dries, and reaches the consistency we all know.  Tarantulas have four spinnerets: The two lower ones are small, and the higher ones are larger and very mobile.”  We did locate a similar looking Ecuadorean Tarantula on Susan Swensen Witherup’s Ithaca College profile.  Maria Sibylla Merian’s 17th Century illustration of a Bird Eating Tarantula was a hotly debated issue in her time and that illustration caused her to fall out of favor among naturalists because of questions of its authenticity.  According to Tarantulas of Ecuador:  “
Theraphosa Blondi
The largest species of tarantula is also called the goliath bird-eating spider, and its leg span can reach up to 12 inches. They are burrowers and spend the majority of their lives inside their homes, never moving more than a few feet away even while hunting. They prefer swampy areas near water, where their brown bodies will blend into the surroundings. Considered extremely aggressive, these spiders do not make good pets, and are prone to biting — their 1-inch fangs can do a great deal of damage, although the venom is not fatal to humans. The typical diet of this spider includes amphibians, rodents, insects, snakes and the occasional small bird.”  It is pictured on Wonderful Insects by Frank Fieldler, and it does not resemble your Tarantula.  Perhaps one of our readers can provide information on the identity of your Tarantula.

Update from Buglady
The image of the unidentified tarantula looks like a Linothele Megatheloides:
http://www.dipluridae.de/wiki/index.php/Linothele_megatheloides
Cheers!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tropical fly
Location: Highlands, Papua New Guinea
January 31, 2015 12:16 am
Found this in our village where we work as missionaries. Never seen anything like it and am wondering what kind it is. (See attached pic)
Signature: David Ogg

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear David,
This is a beautiful and colorful Fly, and we are relatively certain it is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae.  Tachinid Flies are parasitoids.  The female lays an egg on a very host specific prey, and the larval Tachinid Fly feeds on the internal organs eventually killing the host, at which time it will form a puparium and eventually emerge as an adult Tachinid Fly.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”  We are attempting to provide you with a species identification for this distinctive, probable Tachinid Fly.  The Tachinid Collection pictured on Tachinidae Resources includes
Rutilia (Donovanius) regalis, which looks similar to your individual, but we are not even certain of that species’ range.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination