Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Species of Harvestman
Location: Penang, Malaysia
November 11, 2016 10:05 pm
Hey Bugman,
I flipped a rock and found this harvestman but I can’t seem to find any pictures that exactly match this species. Can you identify it?
Thanks!
Signature: Jon

Unknown Harvestman

Unknown Harvestman

Dear Jon,
Though we successfully identified your previously submitted Harvestman, we could not find any matching images of this individual on Classification of Opiliones or elsewhere on the internet in our initial searches.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sweat Bee/Hover Fly
Location: Linn Co., Oregon
October 18, 2016 11:06 pm
These photos were taken near the end of July on Browder Ridge, Oregon. I would appreciate an
identification.
Signature: D. Gudehus

Bee

Bee

Dear D. Gudehus,
We do not recognize this pretty and distinctive Bee.  We are posting it as unidentified and perhaps we will be able to research its identity when we return to the office.  We are leaving for the airport in two hours.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with an identification.  It does not appear to be on Common Bee Pollinators of Oregon Crops.

Bee

Beeuni

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Petite, with long legs, seeks same…
Location: Andover, NJ
October 12, 2016 3:55 pm
I am hoping you can help me narrow this down to a family. Pretty certain it’s a crane fly, although quite a bit smaller than what I’m accustomed to seeing. This one’s body was about 1/2-3/4 inch in length. I was only able to get one view of it before it took off. It had landed on some hostas, but our property is surrounded on 3 sides by woods (hickory, oak, maple, new growth).
Hope you help me out!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Crane Fly we believe

Crane Fly we believe

Dear Deborah,
We agree this is most likely a Crane Fly, and it reminds us of the members of the Liminid Crane Fly or Meadow Crane Fly family Limoniidae, though we didn’t find any images on BugGuide that look like your individual.  For now, we are posting it as unidentified and we will attempt to contact Dr. Chen Young who is a specialist in Crane Flies.

Thanks for getting back to me.  I, too, was thinking Limoniidae, but was also unable to find a match on BugGuide or elsewhere.  Hope your expert will be able to shed some light!
Kindly
Deborah

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red, blue, yellow and green grasshopper
Location: Morelos, Mexico
October 3, 2016 7:38 pm
Hi. I was travelling in and around Mexico city and photographed this very brightly coloured grasshopper and wondered if anyone could identify it for me please. Found in tropical dry forest.
Signature: Andrew

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

Dear Andrew,
This is such a beautiful Grasshopper that we thought it would not be too difficult to identify, however, we spent a bit of time searching for its identity yesterday to no avail, so we are posting it as unidentified and we hope to elicit some assistance from our readership.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grass hopers of 3 different patterns in the same plant
Location: Peña de Bernal, Queretaro, Mexico
October 2, 2016 6:05 pm
Dear bugman,
This summer I found 3 grasshopers morphologically similar but with different color patterns.
The grasshopers where feeding in the same plant in central méxico, The ecosystem where i found them is shrubland with wet summers.
¿Do you know what kind of grasshopper this is?
Signature: Juan Sebastian Ramirez

Painted Grasshopper

Painted Grasshopper

Dear Juan,
The most colorful Grasshopper image you submitted, the black and red individual, is a Painted Grasshopper,
Dactylotum bicolor, a species that, according to BugGuide, is found in:  “Western Great Plains of United States (and southern Canada), southward to Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and into northern Mexico.”  It is the only species in the genus listed on BugGuide, and of the tribe Dactylotini, BugGuide indicates:  “Most genera included in tribe Dactylotini occur only in Mexico.”  It is entirely possible that all your Grasshoppers are in the same tribe.  We have not been able to locate a Mexican site devoted to insects quite as comprehensive as BugGuide, so we cannot say for certain if your green Grasshopper and your brown Grasshopper, which we suspect might be color variations on the same species, are closely related to the Painted Grasshopper.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with identifying your other two images.

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green mini ? fly
Location: Nayarit, Mexico
September 30, 2016 6:31 pm
I’m in the west coast tropics of Mexico. You published my picture of a tailless whip scorpion a few years back. I’m amazed by the diversity of new bugs that show up after each rainstorm down here.
Every time I show a new bug to a local friend, he just shrugs his shoulders (if he’s not terrified by the bug :-)) and says nueva lluvia nuevo animal!
Anyway, this one is the only example I have ever seen, so I hope you can let me know what it is.
Thanks!
Signature: Steve in the tropics of Nayarit.

Free-Living Hemipteran: Planthopper or Other???

Free-Living Hemipteran: Planthopper or Other???

Dear Steve,
This is a Free-Living Hemipteran from the suborder Auchenorrhyncha, a group that includes Cicadas, Leafhopper, Treehoppers and Planthoppers.  Though it resembles a small Cicada, we believe it is a Planthopper in the superfamily Fulgoroidea.  We will continue to research its identity.

Free-Living Hemipteran

Free-Living Hemipteran

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination