Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lepidoptera Madagascar
Location: Masoala, Madagascar
April 30, 2015 8:11 am
Dear Bugman,
Besides the ladybug from last week I found a lot of other interesting creatures. Another one is this Lepidoptera, also from the jungle of Masoala, Madagascar.
Do you have any ideas? I was thinking in the direction of the Arctiinae (erebid moths) ?
Thanks!
Signature: Dennis

Moth: a Riot of Color

Moth: a Riot of Color

Wow Dennis,
Your image is a riot of primary, saturated color.  Our first impression is also Arctiinae, and more specifically the Lichen Moths in the tribe Lithosiini, and you can view numerous North American species on BugGuide.
  Our initial search turned up nothing, and we really need to get some sleep after a long, hard day.

Update:  We still haven’t located a species identification for this spectacular moth, and we are enlisting the assistance of our readership.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Confused in Alaska!
Location: Fairbanks, AK
April 27, 2015 7:18 pm
Hello! Hope your spring has brought all sorts of buggy critters your way. My son found the strangest bug crawling across the leaf mould beneath some willows. My first thought was, could this be a half-pupated butterfly? She had a body like a short fat fuzzy grub (I could see pale green flesh in between the abdomen ridges when she flexed), butterfly-looking legs that pranced, and what appeared to be little fuzzy wing nubs. She had a very tiny head with no proboscis or discernible features, only spindly antennae.
What is she?
Thanks for your help!
Signature: Rebecca Frenzl

Flightless Female Moth

Flightless Female Moth

Dear Rebecca,
What we know for certain is that this is a flightless female moth, and we have done considerable research, and though we do not have a definitive response, we believe we are close.  The Moth PHotographers Group has a page devoted to flightless female moths.  Our first research took us to the possibility that this might be one of the females in the genus
Orgyia, the Vapourers or Tussock Moths, and the Douglas Fir Tussock Moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata, is found in Western Canada, so we thought that might be a good candidate, but based on the images posted to BugGuide, the legs and antennae are much shorter than your individual.  Though images of flightless female moths can be difficult to find online, a look at the mounted pair of Douglas Fir Tussock Moths on Forestry Images confirmed our belief that it was not your species or genus.  We next turned our attention to the genus Lycia in the Spanworm family Geometridae, and the Stout Spanworm seemed like a good candidate as it is found in Western Canada, according to BugGuide, but alas, BugGuide only has images of males with wings pictured.  The Belted Beauty, Lycia zonaria, which is pictured on the Highland Butterflies UK site looks like a good match physically, but it is an old world species and the markings are different.  Except for the markings which are different, the Belted Beauty pictured on UK Moths also looks quite similar to your individual.  We are concluding that since the genus Lycia is represented in Canada by two species according to BugGuide, and both the Stout Spanworm and the Twilight Moth, Lycia rachelae, are reported from western Canada, that one of those species is most likely your flightless female moth, but alas, we had no luck finding any online images of females to compare.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had.

Flightless Female Moth

Flightless Female Moth

Flightless Female Moth

Flightless Female Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Smurfapillar?
Location: San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico
April 27, 2015 4:09 pm
Hi,
I found this bright blue little guy in San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico. I tried to look him up online, and couldn’t seem to find anything remotely similar. He was crawling on the ground in a high desert area where I was walking my dog and taking pictures of Prickly Pear blossoms. The area had been fired, to kill weeds and pests, probably in January or February. The grasses and weeds are coming back pretty well, now, but there’s still a lot of ash and charred ground. I took a bunch of photos, but the guy was moving at a good clip…head and tail going like crazy.
Thanks for your time!
Signature: Tabitha

Unknown Blue Caterpillar

Unknown Blue Caterpillar

Dear Tabitha,
Like you, we were unable to locate any images of blue caterpillars from Mexico.  We believe this is a moth caterpillar.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had regarding an identity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Are These?!
Location: Southern California
April 25, 2015 3:52 am
I work at a convenience store, and OVER NIGHT something laid seseme seed-like eggs in all if our employee cups!!
Ive searched the internet looking for answers, but found nothing! Is it dangerous, poisonous? Help us!
Signature: InconvenientEmployee

What's In The Cup???

What’s In The Cup???

Dear Inconvenient Employee,
We are flummoxed by your request.  This is so strange we don’t know where to start.  Were these things found anywhere but inside the cups?  Their rapid appearance and the specificity of their location seems to suggest a disgruntled employee, or perhaps there is a prankster in your midst. 

What Left This???

What Left This???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillars in Costa Rica
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
April 24, 2015 10:28 am
What are these caterpillars, what are they going to turn into, why do they clump like this, and why does one (lower right) appear to have white things on it?
Signature: Ashley from the Monteverde Institute

Nymphalidae Caterpillars

Moth Caterpillars

Dear Ashley,
We believe these Caterpillars are in the Brush Footed Butterfly family Nymphalidae, and the caterpillar in question appears to have been parasitized by a Chalcid or Braconid Wasp.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to see if he can identify the caterpillars more specifically.

Nymphalidae Caterpillar parasitized by Wasp

Moth Caterpillar parasitized by Wasp

Keith Wolfe provides a correction
Hi Daniel,
Nope, these are immature moths, the scoli (spines) being much too long for any Neotropical nymphalid.
Best wishes,
Keith

After Keith Wolfe’s correction, we are now speculating that they are relatives of Buck Moths in the subfamily Hemileucinae and we will see if Bill Oehlke can provide any information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Madagascar ladybug
Location: Madagascar
April 24, 2015 3:44 am
Dear bugman,
On our trip to Madagascar we found this, in my opinion, ladybug.
I haven’t been able to find anything like it with the ringed-spots and as wondering if you could help me identify it.
Thanks!
nb; maybe worth mentioning; in the surroundings I’ve also found similar orange ladybugs who looked to be of the genus Epilachninae…
Signature: Dennis

What's That Beetle???

What’s That Beetle???

Dear Dennis,
This is probably a Lady Beetle, but we cannot discount at this time that it might be a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  Alas, we are late and we will be posting your image as unidentified, and we will return to the office to research this later today.  The spot pattern is similar to the Eyespot Ladybird Beetle from North America.

Take your time! Thanks for having a look at it 🙂
Gr!

We tried searching without any success this evening, and interestingly, all our searches brought up the posting we created.

Hi Daniel,
That’s interesting indeed, what do suggest I do now?
Gr!

We are only able to devote so much time to a particular identification request because with warm, spring weather conditions prevailing over more of the northern hemisphere, our identification requests increase.  Also, when new requests coming in, older requests become more difficult for us to track as they get buried further back in our inbox.  We would suggest that you place a comment on the posting requesting assistance.  Sometimes months or years later, we receive comments from our loyal readership that result in a long overdue identification.  Your email did not indicate any urgency with the identification.  We don’t know if you are just satisfying your own curiosity or if your life requires an immediate identification.  If the latter, we would suggest that you try attempting a more thorough internet search and pursue other venues for identification.  Meanwhile, your posting will remain on our site in perpetuity, and we hope that one day you will receive the answer you desire.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination