Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Flies
Geographic location of the bug:  Cootamundra, NSW. Australia
Date: 02/20/2018
Time: 12:55 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Wanting to know what sort of fly this is? Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Graham

Horse Fly or Bee Fly???

Dear Graham,
Our initial thought is this must be a Horse Fly (called March Flies in Australia) from the family Tabanidae, but there are no similar looking images on the Brisbane Insects site.  The white edge on the compound eye is a trait found in several Bee Flies on the Brisbane Insect site that share that trait.  We are going to request assistance from our readership with this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Nephila species
Geographic location of the bug:  dunno
Date: 02/04/2018
Time: 12:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I visited the insect collection at the University of Minnesota and they had a very large Nephila that was totally green.  Since it’s not an insect they had not bothered with any provenance!  I have a thing for Nephila and have seen them on several continents, but never saw one like this.  Do you know a species or where it might be from?
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  scott

Golden Silk Spider, but what species???

Dear Scott,
We are surprised the University of Minnesota could not provide you with at least a location where this impressive Golden Silk Spider was collected.  We suspect the colors might have changed from what they were when it was alive, but if anything, the green may have been even more vivid.  We will post your image and perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had scouring the internet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Furry Beetle Australia
Geographic location of the bug:  Bellingen area, NSW
Date: 02/02/2018
Time: 04:35 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
Thank you for having this amazing website available for us all 🙂
Could you please identify this beetle which was on the move today, it was a rainy day and we were about to have a subtropical afternoon storm (it is summer here) when ‘he’ walked across the ground in front of us. He appears to have hair growing from his back, and fur from the rest of his body. Some of the fur looks like it has been ripped off recently, and also his leg and antenna appear to be missing segments.
I greatly appreciate your help in identifying this little guy, as I’m having no luck in refernece books or on the net.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks again, Jodie

Possible Darkling Beetle

Dear Jodie,
This is such a distinctive looking beetle, but we are nonetheless having a difficult time verifying its identity.  In shape, it reminds us of some New World Pleasing Fungus Beetles, but we really suspect it is in the Darkling Beetle family Tenebrionidae.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in an identity.

Possibly Darkling Beetle

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for your prompt reply!
I can see how the beetle has characteritics from both of those suggestions. Another natural curiosity.. The enviroment here has sustained the last known populaion of Giant Dragonfly, previously thought to be extinct in Australia since the 80’s…
You just never know which surprise is next when you open your eyes to the undergrowth 🙂
Thank you again,
Jodie

Possible Darkling Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  beetle Tanzania
Geographic location of the bug:  West Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
Date: 01/14/2018
Time: 05:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Could you please identify this beetle
How you want your letter signed:  Doug

Unknown Assassin Bug

Dear Doug,
This is NOT a Beetle.  It is an Assassin Bug in the family Reduviidae, and we are posting it as unidentified while we attempt to get you a more specific identification.

Subject:  Assassin bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  West Kilimanjaro, Tanzania
Date: 01/19/2018
Time: 08:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve been unable to identify this insect beyond the likelihood that it is an assassin bug. This specimen has rather thick muscular legs with distinctive orange fore and mid legs and the rest of the body and hind legs completely black. Approximate body length = 2.5 cm. Someone suggested this to be in the genus Phonergates but haven’t found any representatives of this genus that look remotely like this one.
How you want your letter signed:  DCavener

Dear DCavener,
Last week Doug submitted this exact image to our site and asked to have the beetle identified.  We responded it was an Assassin Bug, not a Beetle, but we still have not located a genus or species name.

Oops yes, sorry about that! Someone else speculates that this is Phonergates bicoloripes but I can’t find images online or even a detailed description of this species. Is this something you could help with?

The individual from the genus pictured on Discover Life does look similar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Katydid
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Nicoya Peninsula
Date: 01/07/2018
Time: 12:00 PM EDT
Can you identify this bug?
I took these pictures a couple of days ago in a house near Santa Teresa.
It looks a bit like a Haemodiasma Tessellata but the body is flatter and the shape of the head looks different. It has very long, thin antennae, approx twice the length of the body, which are not fully visible in the pictures.
Thanks a lot!
How you want your letter signed:  Matteo

Katydid

Dear Matteo,
We agree that your individual does resemble a Moss Mimic Katydid,
Haemodiasma tessellata, and it also resembles the Panama Sylvan Katydid, Acanthodis curvidens.  We will attempt to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide a species identification.

Katydid

Piotr Naskrecki provides the identification.
Hi Daniel,
Happy New Year to you, too! This is Acanthodis curvidens. Haeodiasma tessellata has a stouter body and the strongly curved spines (“curvidens”) on the hind femur are a giveaway.
Cheers,
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Dear Daniel
Thanks a lot for your answer.
I am a total novice in entomology but since I moved to Costa Rica I am surrounded by all kinds of wildlife and I often bump into weird looking creatures.
So proud my guess was spot on! Hahaha!
Please forward my thanks to Piotr Naskrecki.
Cheers
Matteo
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Saturniid butterfly in Brazil
Geographic location of the bug:  Brazil, Santa Catarina, Benedito Novo
Date: 01/07/2018
Time: 11:43 AM EDT
Hello, I found this caterpillar and I have no clue what it is. At first it seemed like an Automeris, then a Pseudautomeris, then a Molippa… Now I don’t know what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Oscar Neto

Saturniid Caterpillar

Dear Oscar,
Though they both belong to the same insect order Lepidoptera, most English speaking countries differentiate between butterflies which are primarily diurnal, and moths which are primarily, but not exclusively nocturnal.  There are also structural differences between them that is clarified in the taxonomic process.  We agree that this caterpillar belongs to the moth family Saturniidae, and it also appears to be an earlier instar caterpillar.  Many online images are of more mature caterpillars that sometimes differ in appearance from earlier stages.  Our initial guess would also be the genus
Automeris, and our second guess would be Leucanella, and both genera are well represented in Brazil.  We will attempt to get Bill Oehlke, an expert in Saturniids, to attempt to provide you with a species identification.  By chance, was if found feeding on a plant?  Often knowing the food plant is a great assistance in the identification process.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination