Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentifiable Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  South Central PA
Date: 06/29/2019
Time: 08:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  No one seems to know what this bug is.
How you want your letter signed:  Mary Brady

Unknown Robber Fly

Dear Mary,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, and we thought it would be much easier to provide you with a species identification, but we are still uncertain regarding its identity.  It reminds us very much of  
Microstylum morosum which is pictured on BugGuide, but that species is only reported as far east as Missouri on BugGuide.  We will continue to research this matter.  How large was this individual?

Eric Eaton responds after we ask his input.
Daniel:
I got nothin’, sorry.  I would agree with your initial diagnosis, though.  I wonder if there is more to the story?
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Wasp lands on me WITH caterpillar meal
Geographic location of the bug:  Missouri, United States
Date: 06/29/2019
Time: 12:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  so today one of the most cool, weird, and gross things happened to me. I was sitting outside with my bearded dragon and we were under a nice tree. I feel a plop on my arm and I look down to see what it is and my hand is already poised to gently brush off whatever bug has wandered onto me, but I see the black and yellow and my brain registers: THAT is a wasp.
I pulled out my camera as fast as I could because… this is absolutely wild, I’ve never had this happen. and I sit there as I watch this wasp crunch her caterpillar prey WHILE SITTING ON MY ARM… when I moved my arm she got spooked and flew away, leaving her dead caterpillar laying on me… which I brushed off onto the sidewalk.
I have included the caterpillar itself as well, which I’m curious to know the name of, if possible.
How you want your letter signed:  Michael

European Paper Wasp with Caterpillar prey alights on tattooed arm.

Dear Michael,
We applaud your quick reflex “inaction” to the aposomatic or warning coloration on this European Paper Wasp,
Polistes dominula, which we identified thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to the Penn State Department of Entomology: “Before 1981, the European paper wasp was not recorded in North America. In its native region, P. dominulais the most abundant paper wasp in those countries around the Mediterranean. It is also found in southern Europe, northern Africa, the Middle East, and eastward into China.  A highly successful colonizer, this wasp has rapidly increased its distribution in the United States during the past 20 years. Before the introduction of this new species, the northern paper wasp, Polistes fuscatus, was the most frequently encountered species in and around structures in Pennsylvania.”  That site also observes:  “Whenever new species are introduced into an environment (either intentionally or accidentally), there are unpredictable consequences. The increased risk for stings is an obvious concern. Even more troubling, it appears that this new introduction has had an adverse impact on the native species of Polistes. The apparent reduction of indigenous Polistes will undoubtedly result in a change in the faunal balance. It is unclear what the consequences will be. Some entomologists worry that the large numbers of P. dominula will adversely affect the species of desirable insects (i.e., butterflies).”  For that reason, we are tagging your submission as Invasive Exotics as well as Food Chain.  This is also the most frequently encountered Paper Wasp in our our Mount Washington, Los Angeles garden.  We believe this caterpillar is a member of the Owlet Moth family Noctuidae, which includes Cutworms.

Probably Owlet Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  South Korea
Date: 06/27/2019
Time: 04:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello
Please can you tell me what kind of beetle this is?
Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Paul

Longicorn

Dear Paul,
This is a Longicorn or Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, but we have not had any luck identifying the species.  Larvae of beetles in this family are wood borers.

Longicorn

Longicorn

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mystery Bug, Japan
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Hyogo Prefecture, Japan
Date: 06/22/2019
Time: 07:13 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found the strangest bug out on my run today. We’re in the middle of the rainy season right now (late June), and a massive downpour had just finished. I live in a pretty rural area and I found this guy on the road next to the rice paddies. At first I thought it was a caterpillar of some kind, but the way it was moving was a little off. Instead of the normal perstaltic motion it was kinda flopping around more like “the worm” dance, raising it’s head pretty significantly at the end of each movement. And when it flipped over while crawling I was surprised to see it had six legs! The skin looked pretty soft and covered in silt, and combined with the fact that it wasn’t very elegant moving around on land I guessed it was probably aquatic. When I got home I googled pictures for dragonfly larvae though, they don’t match at all! It was about 10 cms long, with a rather big and fat “tail”, six small legs, and small but noticable mandibles. What kind of bug could this be? I’ve never seen anything like this in the three years I’ve lived here. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Justin

Larva Dorsal View

Dear Justin,
Had you only provided us with a dorsal view, we might have pondered this being a Soldier Fly pupa, but the legs and mandibles rule out that possibility.  We believe this is a Beetle larva.  We will continue to research this identification while having posted it as Unidentified.

Larva Ventral View

Update:  Cesar Crash believes this is a Water Scavenger Beetle larva in the family Hydrophylidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subjec:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia Beach, Virginia
Date: 05/31/2019
Time: 06:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please identify this moth
How you want your letter signed:  Maurice culken

Noctuoid we believe

Dear Maurice,
Because of its resemblance to the moths in the genus Tolype, we thought this might be a member of the family Lasiocampidae, be we could not find any similar looking species on BugGuide, so we now believe this is a member of the very large superfamily Noctuoidea represented on BugGuide, but we have not had luck identifying the species.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize this Moth. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown insect from French Alps
Geographic location of the bug:  Val Claret 2300m Tignes, France
Date: 05/27/2019
Time: 01:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Possible White Hyphantria ermine or cunea moth Spilosoma lubricipeda following the only similar picture found so far…
But my beauty has no wings!
How you want your letter signed:  Silvia

Flightless Female Moth

Dear Silvia,
We agree that this is a Moth, but we are not certain of the species or even the family, though we are leaning to Geometridae.  Females of certain species of Moths in the Inchworm family Geometridae and Tussock Moths in the family Erebidae are wingless, hence flightless.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize your beauty and write in with an identifying comment.  

Flightless Female Moth

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for your reply. I got nuts trying to know even what the family was! I’m not entomologist, but biologist, hence very curious
Kind regards,
Silvia
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination