Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bad Spot to Chrysalize
Geographic location of the bug:  West Los Angeles
Date: 02/28/2020
Time: 01:21 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
Guess I’ll need to be extra careful when watering the plants in my back yard.  Can you identify what will emerge from this chrysalis?
Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Jeff Bremer

Probably Brush Footed Butterfly Chrysalis

Hi Jeff,
This is definitely a butterfly chrysalis, and we are pretty certain it is a Brush-Footed Butterfly in the family Nymphalidae, but we have not had luck with a definitive identification.  This is a rather distinctive chrysalis and we don’t know why the identification is giving us trouble.  We will attempt to contact Keith Wolfe for assistance.

Probably Brush Footed Butterfly Chrysalis

Thanks Bugman,
At first I thought it might be a Gulf Fritillary, but the small “threads” protruding at the end ruled that out. Haven’t seen a Brush-Footed Butterfly in my back yard before, so I’m hoping to be there for the emergence.
Jeff
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Llubovane Dam, Eswatini, Southern Africa
Date: 02/25/2020
Time: 12:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good day,
Please can you ID these two spiders. The large one is beautiful. They were on a dead tree stump in the dam. The large one was walking down the stump under the water and coming back up, perhaps looking for food?
How you want your letter signed:  Jacqui

Fishing Spider we believe

Dear Jacqui,
The behavior you witnessed, “large one was walking down the stump under the water and coming back up, perhaps looking for food?”, and the markings on the carapace are both consistent with Fishing Spiders from the genus
Dolomedes found in North America, as evidenced by this BugGuide image.  While we have not had any luck locating any similar looking South African members of the genus, according to Wikipedia:  “The second largest number of species occur in tropical Africa.”  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to identify your gorgeous spider to the species level.  We do not know the identity of the smaller Spider in your image.  According to Science Direct:  “Sierwald (1988) examined predatory behavior of the African pisaurid Nilus curtus O.P.-Cambridge (=Thalassius spinosissimus [Karsch]). Its hunting posture is like that of Dolomedes, anchored by one or more hindlegs to an emergent object with its remaining legs spread on surface of water. When disturbed, the spider pulls itself below the surface of the water by crawling down an emergent object. They can remain submerged for up to 35 min. Prey swimming under water (insects, tadpoles) are grabbed by the front legs pushing down through the surface film. Prey trapped by surface tension were jumped on if close enough, or rowed to if further away.”  Members from the genus Nilus pictured on iNaturalist do resemble your individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it??
Geographic location of the bug:  Shark Valley, Everglades National Park
Date: 12/13/2019
Time: 01:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!
Never seen anything quite like this. It was on a cocoplum leaf.
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

Unknown Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Mike,
This is definitely a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  The red color is quite unusual.  We believe it might be a Crowned Slug Caterpillar,
Isa textula, which is pictured on BugGuide, but we cannot locate any images of red individuals.  Sometimes caterpillars change colors right before metamorphosis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this yellow wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa Rica, Nicoya Peninsuala
Date: 12/09/2019
Time: 05:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there! I’m living in Costa Rica and accustomed to all manner of crazy bugs, including having many, many paper wasps making my home their home. I’ve come across a very pretty wasp today, however, which I’ve never seen before. Any time there’s only one of something and it’s abnormally pretty, I start to wonder. I was hoping you could help me identify my new kitchen guest and let me know if I should be nervous about the surprisingly long stinger or not.
(sorry about the dust…it’s a daily accumulation, it’s crazy down here!)
Thanks in advance!
How you want your letter signed:  Monique

Unknown Ichneumon

Dear Monique,
We believe this is a parasitoid Ichneumon, a harmless solitary Wasp, but we have not had any luck finding any similar looking individuals online.  According to BugGuide:  “arguably, the largest animal family, with the estimated 60,000 species worldwide (up to 100,000, according to some estimates”  and “Ichneumonids are notoriously hard to identify: aside from the sheer number of species, there are numerous cases of distant relatives that appear almost identical. Any identification based solely on comparing images should be treated as suspect unless an expert has said there are no lookalikes for the species or group in question.”  Ichneumons are important biological control agents and many species prey on caterpillars.  The female uses her long ovipositor (not a real stinger) to lay eggs inside the body of the living host and the larva that hatches will feed on the internal organs of the host, eventually killing it.

Thank you Daniel!
I used your identification in Google Images and, instead of getting moths like searching my image did, I found many similar images, so I completely trust your ID. She really was pretty and I hope that she finds a nice caterpillar nearby to help her hatch a lovely family.
Thanks for such a quick reply!
Monique

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and White hairy caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Guatemala
Date: 10/11/2019
Time: 09:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found two of these large caterpillars on different avocado trees in a wet mountain area near San Pedro, Guatemala, do you know what they are called? 3″ soft hairy, don’t bit or sting.
How you want your letter signed:  Caroline

Unidentified Caterpillar

Dear Caroline,
We tried unsuccessfully to identify this distinctive Moth Caterpillar.  Some families we explored were Erebidae, Lasiocampidae and Apatelodidae.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more success with this identification.

Unidentified Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this thing?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 08/15/2019
Time: 11:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, recently I found this very strange looking…wasp? Hornet? I don’t know. It was dead when I found it. I tried searching for what it might be online but couldn’t find anything with a matching description. I hope you can help!! Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Mack

Robber Fly

Dear Mack,
This is a large, predatory Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, but we do not recognize the species.  The black coloration is quite unusual for an eastern species.  It might be
Proctacanthus nigriventris which is pictured on BugGuide.  Your dorsal, lateral and frontal views are excellent for an expert’s ability to identify the genus and species, but alas, we do not possess that expertise.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide a less general identification.

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination