Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glow worm?
Location: Rimrock, AZ
April 25, 2017 8:27 pm
Found this on the floor of my apartment tonight. What is it?
Signature: Laura

Bioluminescent Larva

Dear Laura,
This does not look like a typical Glowworm to us.  Glowworms or Railroad Worms are the larvae of beetles in the family Phengodidae.  This doesn’t look like a Firefly Larva from the family Lampyridae either.  It does look like a Wireworm, the larva of a Click Beetle.  There are bioluminescent Glowing Click Beetles in the genus Deilelater, but we have not been able to locate an image of the larva.  BugGuide only lists North American sightings in Texas and Florida, however, BugGuide does indicate “
D. physoderus GA-FL-AZ, Mexico.”  Though that is circumstantial, our best guess right now is that this might be the larva of a Glowing Click Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this gorgeous spider?
Location: Central Ohio
April 25, 2017 12:59 pm
Hello! Recently converted arachnophobe here – made friends with an argiope aurantia last year…now I’m fascinated with our spider buddies, and have educated myself on the various species in my area (Central Ohio). I walk my property every day looking for new friends, and I came across this absolutely beautiful spider. She was hanging out in a very fuzzy, messy web (not an orbweaver-like web), and did me the courtesy of posing for photos taken with my phone. Very docile, green legs, white and yellow underbelly…but no idea what she is. Any idea? Thank you!
Signature: Jaime

Unknown Spider

Dear Jaime,
At first glance we thought this resembled an Orchard Spider, but closer inspection caused us to change our minds, plus it is early in the year for an Orchard Spider in Ohio, and the web you described does not fit.  We searched through the genera of the Comb Footed Spiders in the family Theridiidae on BugGuide and we could not find a match.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize this spider.

Unknown Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy large black spider, New Mexico
Location: Rio rancho, NM
April 18, 2017 9:32 pm
I have several of these around my home and I just want to know what kind of spiders they are. I cannot find anything online and I refuse to spray. I just need to know if they are poisonous.
Signature: Rainah

Unknown Spider

Dear Rainah,
Your images were quite dark, but we used some post-production image adjustment to lighten them enough to support our suspicion that this Crevice Weavers Spider is most likely a female Southern House Spider,
Kulcania hibernalis, based on images posted to BugGuide.  This species exhibits extreme sexual dimorphism, meaning the two sexes look like different species.  According to BugGuide:  “Females are frequently mistaken for small tarantulas or trapdoor spiders. Males are often mistaken for recluse spiders (Loxosceles). This is a totally harmless species that builds “messy” webs emanating from crevices, often on the outside of homes.”  Though BugGuide data does not indicate any New Mexico sightings, they are found in nearby Texas and as far west as California, so a New Mexico sighting is quite probable.  This might also be the closely related Kukulcania arizonica, which is pictured on BugGuide and which is reported from New Mexico.  Of the entire genus, BugGuide states:  “These spiders create a tube-like retreat in cracks. This spider varies greatly in color from light brown to dark black. Females are generally grey to black while the males are tan.”  While we suspect a bite might occur through careless handling or accidental encounters, the House Spiders are not a threat to humans and they might help control other less desirable household intruders like cockroaches and scorpions.

Unknown Spider

Ed. Note:  April 26, 2017
A comment from Cesar Crash has caused us to back off what we thought was an identification.  We are now unsure of the family classification.  There is a resemblance to the Common House Spider from the UK, and a search of the genus
Tegenaria on BugGuide turned up some interesting information, especially regarding an unpictured species “T. chiricahuae – caves in southeastern Arizona and New Mexico (our only native Tegenaria).”  Needless to say, we are classifying this as a Spider at this time until we feel more confident regarding a family designation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’m not sure which blister beetle this is
Location: Culebron Spain
April 15, 2017 9:18 am
Would you mind identifying this insect please, I found it in Culebron in Spain. Thank you
Signature: Lorna

Blister Beetle or Not???

Dear Lorna,
We have not had any luck in our first attempt to identify this unusual beetle.  While the head and body structure do resemble those of a Blister Beetle in the family Meloidae, the antennae seem  to belong to a member of a different family, Cerambycidae.  We are seeking other opinions.

Blister Beetle or other family?

Thank you so much Daniel for replying to me, I’m getting quite excited now that it seems unfamilar to you, I don’t know much about insects but I couldn’t find it anywhere on the Internet and now I’m getting really interested in learning more about the wonderful strange things. Maybe it will be named after me ‘beetle Lorna’ I’m sure not but it’s a nice idea!!!

Eric Eaton Provides a Non-Conclusive Response
Daniel:
I have no idea.  I’m not even sure if it is fully formed.  Looks like it just molted into an adult, which means it could be almost anything.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Thanks Eric,
That makes sense about it being “intermetamorphal.”

Thank you Daniel! Nobody here in Spain knows what it is either.
Lorna Gardner

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Subject: Bug in birdbath
Location: Northern California
April 7, 2017 7:29 am
I saw this bug yesterday, April 6, on the rock in my birdbath. I cannot identify it and would appreciate your input. Northern California location.
Thank you!
Signature: Kate Schaffner

Dance Fly

Dear Kate,
Both the antennae and the proboscis lead us to believe this is some type of Fly in the order Diptera, but alas, we do not recognize it.  We will contact Eric Eaton for assistance.

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
This is some kind of dance fly in the family Empididae, and by the looks of it a female (males have a bulbous rear end).  Very common early spring flies.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Dance Fly

BugGuide has some similar looking images from the genus Hilara, the Balloon Flies.

Thank you so much Daniel and Eric!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My wife got stung
Location: Houston texas
April 6, 2017 9:12 pm
Hello,
My wife went outside at night to get the clothes from the dryer and she said she heard a buzzing sound and felt a bug land on her chest, she didn’t get to see it but when she tried to shew it away it stung her and made a pretty good hole on her chest and it swelled up about a half inch in diameter. Please help
Signature: A. Gonzalez

Unknown Stinging Thing

Dear A. Gonzalez,
We cannot make out any insect details in the image you supplied.  We did not get your email until this morning.  If your wife is still being affected by the symptoms of the sting, you should seek professional medical assistance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination