Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Biting insect
Location: Tipperary, Ireland
July 12, 2017 9:48 am
Hi
I was bitten by an insect last week that left a red itchy mark that seemed to get infected. I was outside at the time in Ireland (July). I killed the insect when brushing it off me. The only way to stop the itching and make the spit go away is to apply iodine. Luckily today I saw one of the bugs crawling on my table outside. Im almost sure its the same thing.
Signature: Any help would be appreciated

Possibly Damsel Bug

Your image does not have the critical detail we would like to get for identification purposes, but this is definitely a True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera.  They have mouths designed to pierce and suck fluids, but we don’t believe this is a blood-sucker.  It might be a predatory Damsel Bug, and there are some images on the British Bugs site that look similar, but not similar enough for us to make an identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this??
Location: New Hampshire
July 3, 2017 12:37 pm
Found in our house in southern New Hampshire in July. Approximately 1 inch long. What is it?
Signature: Katie

Longicorn

Dear Katie,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but we need additional time to identify the species.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with an identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown Black Bee visits Wisteria
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 6, 2017 7 PM
While we were away from the office, the potted wisteria did not get watered enough and it dropped all its leaves, forcing it into an unseasonal bloom cycle.  Late in the afternoon, this little black Bee visited the plant.  It is half the size of a female Carpenter Bee, and try though we might, we could not match it to any Bumble Bee or other Bee on BugGuide.  The identity of this little Black Bee is unknown.

Unknown Black Bee

Potted Wisteria

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green caterpillar
Location: NE corner of WA state.
June 27, 2017 1:53 pm
I’d like to identify the caterpiller (and it resulting moth or butterfly) in the attached photos. It seems to act like a tent caterpiller but spins a strand and drops down to earth. Most strands get wrapped around each other forming a much larger strand (1/4″ dia) that reaches the ground. This site was on a forest road in NE Washington.
Thanks.
Signature: John McMillan

Caterpillar Swarm

Dear John,
Since it is green and appears to be hairless, this is most definitely NOT a Tent Caterpillar.  Our web searching for caterpillars exhibiting this behavior in Washington has not produced anything significant, however we did find this interesting article Daily Mail concerning millions of green caterpillars on a single tree.  The site states:  “Stuart Edmunds, from Shropshire Wildlife Trust, said he believed the moths could be the larvae of the aptly named ash moth: ‘It is incredibly rare, when there is a limited supply of trees like there is in this area the ash moth mothers could have decided to lay their eggs all in one place. Usually the caterpillars would be distributed over many more trees and with this many on a few trees there is a danger it could weaken the trees'”  Was the phenomena you observed limited to a single tree?  We feel certain this is a moth caterpillar.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to help us solve this mystery.

Caterpillar Swarm

Thanks, Daniel.
The site in the photos was all in one tree (which looked rather dry and somewhat bare of leaves).
However, we did see smaller versions of this in two other trees along that same patch of forest. We did not identify the trees the ash moth caterpillers were hanging from.
Maybe others will give us more firm data to add to yours.
Cheers.

Caterpillar Swarm

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Catapiller Destroyed Palm and stings too
Location: Albion, Guyana, South America
June 28, 2017 11:19 am
This little guy and a few of his friends ate up my small palm tree. Didn’t see them under the leaf and hit them with my arm. Arm swelled up and burned.
I just wondering what it is?
Signature: Troy Kozza

Stinging Slug Caterpillar

Dear Troy,
This is a Stinging Slug Caterpillar in the family Limacodidae, but we are not certain of the species.  It looks very similar to this image from Master File, but it is only identified to the family level.  Perhaps Cesar Crash who runs Insetologia will recognize it.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large gregarious caterpillar
Location: La Selva Biological station, Costa Rica
June 25, 2017 11:44 am
Hello bugman,
My wife Kathy and I found several congregations of these 4 inch long ringed caterpillars at La selva biological station in Costa Rica. Any idea what the species is?
Thank you for your input.
George Grall
Signature: George

Unknown Caterpillars

Dear George,
WE would have thought that caterpillars this strikingly marked and colored would be easy to identify, but alas, that is not the case.  We cannot even state for certain if they will metamorphose into butterflies or moths.  We will post them as unidentified and perhaps on of our readers will have better luck with an identification than we have had.

Hi Dan,
Thank you for your appraisal of the image.   I tried on the internet and could not find another image of these caterpillars.  I will keep trying.
George

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination