Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Michigan in dune grasses near small inland lake.
Date: 06/30/2018
Time: 03:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Duo you know what it is? Some type of water scorpion?
How you want your letter signed:  Matt Maier

Jumping Spider

Dear Matt,
This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae, but we have yet to identify the genus or species.  When we have a spare moment, we will browse through BugGuide and attempt to identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug ID request
Geographic location of the bug:  Black Hills, SD
Date: 07/01/2018
Time: 10:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found at high elevation in the Black Hills. Location was Kamp Kinship.
How you want your letter signed:  Jeff

Flat-Faced Longhorn

Dear Jeff,
This is one of the Flat-Faced Longhorns in the subfamily Lamiinae, but we are still attempting to locate a species identification on BugGuide.  How large was this individual?  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large egg-laying beetle on fallen tree
Geographic location of the bug:  Pollock Pines, California
Date: 06/20/2018
Time: 07:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Bugman, I spotted this large-ish beetle on a fallen tree, sticking its ovipositor in crevices in the wood.  What is this bug?
How you want your letter signed:  John

Jewel Beetle

Dear John,
This is a Metallic Borer Beetle or Jewel Beetle in the family Buprestidae, but we are not having any luck determining a species for you.  Do you know what type of tree you sighted it upon?

Hi, Daniel.
Sorry, I wouldn’t have known the tree type but I do have footage of the beetle probing about the wood.Metallic Borer or Jewel beetle – are they bad?
I ask because this photo was taken at a lake where hundreds of dead trees have been cut down apparently due to a beetle invasion
Thanks all the same.
John
Daniel,
I looked about for the beetle responsible for tree deaths at the local lake. It’s a bark beetle.
Although the beetle’s destruction of trees may not be a terrible thing?
Hello again John,
You are correct.  The Bark Beetles are responsible for the tree die-off.  Jewel Beetles have larvae that bore in wood, but they are rarely numerous enough to create a problem. 
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Monster Robberfly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Jones Hole Creek Northeast Utah, near Colorado border
Date: 06/14/2018
Time: 02:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this  big guy on a hiking trail with my family in north eastern Utah.     Kind of looks a bit like like a Robber Fly,  but it’s HUGE!
How you want your letter signed :  Steven Erickson & Family

Possibly Flower Loving Fly

Dear Steven,
We agree that this does resemble a Robber Fly, and being huge is not an exclusionary trait for the family as there are many very large Robber Flies, including the Bezebul Bee Eater, and though the linked image from our archives is not critically sharp, the size of the Red Wasp prey should give you some sense of scale.  We were not successful in finding a matching image on BugGuide, which might indicate it is a rarely encountered species due to the remote location, or perhaps it is not a Robber Fly.  What we can say with some degree of certainty is that this individual is female because of the space between the eyes and that is blends perfectly with the color of the sand indicating it had adapted well to the environment.  We did some additional research on BugGuide on other families in the superfamily to which the Robber Flies belong, Asiloidea, and we feel there are some Flower Loving Flies in the family Apioceridae that look quite similar, but not exactly alike, including this unidentified individual on BugGuide and this member of the genus
Apiocera on BugGuide.  Our editorial staff is currently out of the office on holiday, but next week when we return, we will consult with Eric Eaton to get his opinion.  If we are correct that this is a Flower Loving Fly in the family Apioceridae, then this will be a new category for our archives.  Also, in an effort to provide accuracy in the location, we surmise that you mean Jones Hole Creek and not Joned Hole Creek.

Robber Fly, we suspect

Update:  We just posted this image of a Stinkfliege in the family Xylophagidae and we can’t help but to entertain the possibility that this Fly might also be a member of that family.

Update:  June 16, 2018
After further pondering and a comment from Cesar Crash, we agree that this is most likely a species of Robber Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  weevils in the rainforest
Geographic location of the bug:  Rio Celeste de Upala near Rincon de la Vieja, Guanacaste,CR
Date: 06/12/2018
Time: 10:16 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help me to identify these weevils, they were very interesting in texture and I can’t find them in INBIO,http://coleoptera-neotropical.org/paginas/2_PAISES/C-Rica/Curculionoidea/Curculionidae-CRica.html, or anything else
thank you in advance
How you want your letter signed:  Weevils from Rio Celeste de Upala

Mating Weevils

Like you, we have not had any luck determining a species identity for these mating Weevils.  We did locate an image at the very bottom of the Homestead Brooklyn blog page devoted to Tapanti National Park that is unidentified and another similar looking individual from Selva Verde, Costa Rica that is unidentified on Alamy.  The Costa Rica Research page of the Microbiology at Occidental College site also has a similar looking unidentified Weevil on it.  Finally, we located your image on Jungle Dragon.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

Mating Weevils

Thank you for your help!
It is always very tricky to identify CR insects.  There are no books and no good web sites, only those meant for biological warfare identify ‘plagas’ or pests..
With best wishes
Annette

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant Grasshopper
Geographic location of the bug:  Tilaran, Costa Rica
Date: 06/12/2018
Time: 08:14 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please identify this cricket. I found it in the garden. It was very big for a grashopper (more than 10cm)
How you want your letter signed:  Johannes

Katydid

Dear Johannes,
This is not a Grasshopper, nor is it a Cricket.  It is a Katydid, a member of the same insect order, Orthoptera.  Katydids have long, slender antennae which distinguishes them from Grasshoppers.  We have not had any luck making a species identification for you, but this female’s ovipositor is quite spectacular, which should help in the eventual identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination