Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID of Cancun bee
Location: Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo, Mexico
December 31, 2016 12:51 pm
I took these pictures on 12/28 at about 8:30 AM in Puerto Morelos, Quintana Roo, Mexico, just south of Cancun. I thought it was some species of bumble bee, but have not been able to identify it through on-line research. I believe the white on the head and thorax is just pollen. I’m sorry for the blurriness of some of the images – I’m sending you the best of the lot. Could you please tell me what species you think this might be? Thank you.
Signature: Nochejt

Bumble Bee

Orchid Bee

Dear Nochejt,
We believe you are probably correct that this is a Bumble Bee.  We also agree that the white on the head and thorax is pollen.  We have not had any luck locating any solid black Bumble Bees with solid yellow abdomens online, but we will continue to attempt to provide a species identification for you.

Bumble Bee

Orchid Bee

Thank you Daniel. I also have come up empty. Possible new species?

Bumble Bee

Orchid Bee

Correction Courtesy of Karl
Hello Daniel and Nochejt:
I believe this is actually an Orchid Bee in the tribe Euglossini. The genus is Eulaema and the species is likely E. polychroma. Regards, Karl

Awesome Karl/Daniel!  Thank you so much.  After looking up Eulaema polychroma, I agree.  The distribution is a good match.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: Tangjiahe Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China
December 8, 2016 12:39 pm
This one was also photographed in Tangjiahe Nature Reserve, Sichuan, China at night sitting on asphalt road. Between tips of wings estimated to be about 60 and 80 mm.
Signature: Stefan Lithner

Giant Silkmoth from China

Giant Silkmoth from China

Dear Stefan,
This is a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae, but we cannot seem to locate a matching image online.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide an identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper from Alice Springs
Location: Alice Springs
November 21, 2016 2:26 pm
I found Three grasshopper at Alice Springs, Australia in February.
Can you help me identifying the Bugs.
If you can identify the Bugs, you may use the pictures on you homepage.
Signature: Just bug names

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Two of your Grasshoppers, the olive green and white striped individual and the green crested individual are both quite unique looking and we thought they might be easy to identify, but that has not proven to be the case.  They are not pictured on the Field Guide to Grasshoppers of Brisbane and South East Queensland, nor are they on Oz Animals which might mean their range is limited to the Northern Territory.  We will continue to research your Grasshoppers’ identities.  We are posting the images and perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Hi Daniel
Thank you for your try up to now. I am looking forward to hear from you again.
Regards
Henning

Grasshopper

Crested Tooth Grinder

Identification:  Thanks to a comment from Trevor, we now know that this is a Crested Tooth Grinder, Ecphantus quadrilobus, a species we already have in our archives and which is also pictured on iGoTerra and on FlickR.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug seen in thailand
Location: Phuket, Thailand
November 16, 2016 2:54 am
This bug dropped down onto our sunbed – maybe from the palm trees? We are in Phuket, Thailand in November.
It’s about 1″ – 2.5 cm long and pale brown with markings like tree bark
Signature: JanP

Weevil we presume

Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear JanP,
This sure is an unusual looking Beetle, and we presume it is a Weevil in the superfamily Curculionoidea.  The antennae are unusually thick.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had finding a matching image online.

Correction Courtesy of Cesar Crash
Thanks to a comment from Cesar, we now have a link to a Longhorned Borer Beetle genus
Pachylocerus on Cerambycidae Catalog Search.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Wasp
Location: Chiriqui, panama
November 12, 2016 8:27 pm
Hi Bugman, I saw this wasp at a gas station in Panama in October. A tour guide said it was a spider hawk but the internet pictures of those show they have orange wings. The closest thing I found to this is the great black wasp but the wings are not the same shape. Any ideas?
Signature: Lori Mailloux

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

Dear Lori,
We agree with the tour guide that this is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and Tarantula Hawks belong to a genera of Spider Wasps, and many, but not all, have orange wings.  Alas, we have not had any luck finding any matching images online.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Variant?
Location: Portland, Oregon
November 11, 2016 5:09 pm
These two hemipterans were playing touchy-feely near Portland, Oregon. One is obviously a Western Boxelder bug, but the other one is leaving me slightly perplexed. Although the photograph doesn’t do it justice, the shield bug was essentially black and gold, almost as if highlighted with goldleaf. I suspect it is just a variant of the brown marmorated stink bug; I’ve seen ones with brownish, or reddish, or greenish hues, but never one that that seemed to sparkle in the sun. In any case, after about a minute of inter-species investigation the two bugs went their separate ways. Your thoughts? I know you’re probably inundated with identification requests, so if this is just another BMSB, please feel free to ignore the inquiry.
Thanks,
Signature: David Hopkins

Stink Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Stink Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Dear David,
We have corrected the spelling error you requested.  In our opinion, this is NOT a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug because according to BugGuide:  “The brown mottled color and banded antennae are distinctive” and your individual has solid colored antennae.  This might be an African Cluster Bug,
Agonoscelis puberula, which we found on BugGuide, though BugGuide does not list the range for this invasive species in Oregon at this time.  Our biggest doubt regarding that as the identification is that BugGuide indicates it is “very pubescent” or hairy, and your individual appears to be quite smooth in your high quality image.  So, for now we cannot commit to a species identification, and we really like your inter-species investigation with the Western Boxelder Bug.

Possibly African Cluster Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Possibly African Cluster Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Thanks for your very prompt reply, Daniel.  I noticed the lack of antennal banding, as well, although there does seem to be some variation in the widths of the light and dark bands on the brown marmorated stink bug.  With a little imagination (well, with a lot of imagination, actually) hints of white at the antennal joints might be made out, but not enough to be considered banding.  I think you’re right that it’s probably not an African Cluster Bug; not only is it not very pubescent, it lacks the light “Y” or trident shape commonly seen on the scutellum.  For now, let’s call it Verus mysterium!
Dave

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination