Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large gregarious caterpillar
Location: La Selva Biological station, Costa Rica
June 25, 2017 11:44 am
Hello bugman,
My wife Kathy and I found several congregations of these 4 inch long ringed caterpillars at La selva biological station in Costa Rica. Any idea what the species is?
Thank you for your input.
George Grall
Signature: George

Unknown Caterpillars

Dear George,
WE would have thought that caterpillars this strikingly marked and colored would be easy to identify, but alas, that is not the case.  We cannot even state for certain if they will metamorphose into butterflies or moths.  We will post them as unidentified and perhaps on of our readers will have better luck with an identification than we have had.

Hi Dan,
Thank you for your appraisal of the image.   I tried on the internet and could not find another image of these caterpillars.  I will keep trying.
George

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Long-horned borer?
Location: Lamar Co., Mississippi, USA
June 16, 2017 8:51 pm
A friend of mine in Lamar County, Mississippi sent this photo for id as she thought it was a pretty interesting bug. The closest I could come up with was the red-headed ash borer, and I’m certain that isn’t it. Who is this beetle? Should my friend be worried about her timber?
Signature: J Kyzar

Cypress Bark Borer

Dear J Kyzar,
You are correct that this is a Longhorned Borer Beetle or Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but it is not a Red Headed Ash Borer, though we believe it is a member of the same subfamily Cerambycinae.  We have not had any luck scouring either BugGuide or Arthur Evans’ excellent book “Beetles of Eastern North America”, so we have reached out to both Arthur Evans and Eric Eaton for assistance.  We hope to have a response for you soon.  The swollen femora and basal antennae segments are very distinctive, as are the color and markings.  We don’t know how to search the database on the Mississippi State University Cerambycidae of Mississippi page, but we did try to contact curator Terence Schiefer for assistance as well.

Cypress Bark Borer

Arthur Evans Responds.
Where is it from?  Sorry! I seen now that it is from Mississippi. Checking…
http://bugguide.net/node/view/573634

Cypress Bark Borer

Dear Arthur,
Thanks so much for identifying the Cypress Bark Borer,
Physocnemum andreae.  It is interesting that there is only one image on BugGuide from South Carolina and the site states:  “uncommon.”  The images of mounted specimens on Cerambycidae Species are very detailed.

Eric Eaton Responds
Wow!  Maybe the person can post these images to Bugguide?  There is only one image for the species right now.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

Thank you so much! I have a moderate background in entomology (I used to work with plecopterans) and when my friend asked for an ID on Facebook I turned to your site and bug guide. Much to my dismay I couldn’t find anything that matched! I have a few other images of the beetles and I’ll head on over to bug guide and submit them.
Thanks!
J Kyzar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mother & babies or mass parasitism?
Location: Altadena CA foothills (chaparral)
June 18, 2017 7:08 pm
We have no idea what’s happening here… I strongly suspect parasitism?? Forwarding the photo to What’s That Bug for consultation!
Signature: Lori & Neighbors in Altadena

Caterpillar and Parasitoid

Dear Lori and Neighbors in Altadena,
This Caterpillar is definitely the victim of a Parasitoid.  Alas, we don’t think we will be able to accurately identify either species.  The Caterpillar appears to be an Inchworm in the family Geometridae, but we would need to see the prolegs to know for certain.  We suspect the parasitoid may be a species of Tachinid Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle? Missouri
Location: Holts Summit, Missouri
June 5, 2017 11:02 am
Hi, I’ve asked several entomologists what this is and no one knows! Hoping for an ID, thanks! The beetle measured about 5/8 inch long and was found at the edge of a densely wooded area, central Missouri.
Signature: Pam Hackler

Stink Bug Nymph

Dear Pam,
This is not a beetle.  This is an immature Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, but we have not had any luck identifying the species on BugGuide, nor did we find any matching images on the Missouri Botanical Gardens Stink Bug page.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide a species name.

Stink Bug Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle ID
Location: Mt Rainier NP, WA
June 6, 2017 9:08 am
Team Biota, volunteers at Mt Rainier would like you to identify a recent find from Steven’s Canyon in Mt Rainier. The beetle was crawling along the rocks in the canyon (70 degrees, sunny) but, did not appear feeding on any plant life. Have never seen this beetle in the Park before.
Signature: J. Dreimiller

Unknown Flea Beetle

Dear J. Dreimiller,
This looks to us like a Flea Beetle in the genus
Disonycha, which is well represented on BugGuide, however, BugGuide data does not list any species as being reported in Washington or indeed, the entire Pacific Northwest.  At any rate, the best we can provide at this time is that this is a Leaf Beetle in the family Chrysomelidae.  There are no Leaf Beetles reported on the Mount Rainier National Park Check List, so perhaps you should post your images there to see if you can get a more specific identification.  Please let us know if you learn anything, and perhaps one of our readers will provide a comment with an identification.

Unknown Flea Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on my front door
Location: Thomasville, Georgia
May 30, 2017 4:27 pm
Hi! I found this bug today…May 30, 2017, in southwest Georgia. Just curious why it might be. Someone suggested an assassin bug but I can’t find a picture that looks like it. Ha just saying !
Signature: Kathryn

Unknown Nymph

Dear Kathryn,
This is not an Assassin Bug, but it is an immature True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera.  We will attempt a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination