Currently viewing the tag: "Unidentified"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this thing?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 08/15/2019
Time: 11:37 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, recently I found this very strange looking…wasp? Hornet? I don’t know. It was dead when I found it. I tried searching for what it might be online but couldn’t find anything with a matching description. I hope you can help!! Thank you.
How you want your letter signed:  Mack

Robber Fly

Dear Mack,
This is a large, predatory Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, but we do not recognize the species.  The black coloration is quite unusual for an eastern species.  It might be
Proctacanthus nigriventris which is pictured on BugGuide.  Your dorsal, lateral and frontal views are excellent for an expert’s ability to identify the genus and species, but alas, we do not possess that expertise.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide a less general identification.

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Atop Casper Mtn,. Wyoming
Date: 08/16/2019
Time: 02:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I would love to know the identity of this cat.  Photo taken 8/13/19.
How you want your letter signed:  Dwaine

Unidentified Moth Caterpillar

Dear Dwaine,
Despite the excellent detail in your images and the distinctive characteristics of this Moth Caterpillar, we are unable to provide you with an identification at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist in this identification.

Unidentified Moth Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Sierra Nevada bug I cant identify
Geographic location of the bug:  Eastern Sierra range
Date: 08/12/2019
Time: 10:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, encountered this lovely green and red (or orange?) bug at 9800 feet near a lake in eastern Sierras near mammoth,
CA. An entomologist friend thought it was a “true bug” but wasn’t sure specifically what it was. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Craig P

Unidentified Mirid Plant Bug

Hi Craig,
When it comes to attempting to identify unknown insects, large and showy creatures with a wide distribution range are much more likely to be documented with online images than are smaller insects with a limited range.  Species only found at higher elevations are often poorly represented on the internet.  We agree with the entomologist that this is a True Bug, but if that was the best the entomologist could provide, we might be going out on a limb stating we believe this is a Plant Bug in the family Miridae.  It looks similar to the Scarlet Plant Bug pictured on The Natural History of Orange County, but it is obviously a different species.  We had no luck browsing BugGuide which indicates there are 1930 members of the family in North America.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize your Mirid Plant Bug.

Thank you so much! That alone is helpful (and interesting). Had no idea this would be such a stumper, but I’m also a novice.
Thanks again. Will keep eyes out for more thoughts.
CP

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  bug id
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Cruz Mountains
Date: 08/08/2019
Time: 08:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found these bugs in my spring water filter, and a few in my tank.  Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  lesley obermayer

Freshwater Crustacean

Dear Lesley,
We cannot provide you with a species identification, but this is some type of Freshwater Crustacean, probably an Amphipod or Isopod.  Most Amphipods are found in saltwater, but they can also be found in freshwater, including in caves.  According to BugGuide:  “A clear view of the antennae is needed to identify freshwater amphipods beyond order level.”  The only freshwater species pictured on the Natural History of Orange County is
Gammarus, and we would eliminate that as a possibility.  California Fish and Game has an online paper entitled Checklist of inland aquatic Isopoda (Crustacea: Malacostraca) of California, but there are no images.  BugGuide has an image of an Isopod in the family Asellidae and the genus Lirceolus that looks very similar to your individual, and we would attempt additional research by searching for members of the family Asellidae found in California.  The previously noted paper by California Fish and Game includes many family members, but again, there are no images.  This could be a rare endemic species, or it might be an exotic introduction.   Though we cannot provide you with anything more specific, we do feel confident that their presence will not adversely affect the quality of your spring water.

Freshwater Crustaceans

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much. You appear to have identified our bugs.
Now we have to figure out how to eliminate them. Appreciate you taking the time and trouble to help us out.
Enjoy your days,
Lesley Obermayer

Freshwater Crustaceans

You are welcome.  You might want to check with your local natural history museum for a more definitive identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green caterpillar with reddish/brown markings along the back
Geographic location of the bug:  Benzie Michigan
Date: 08/02/2019
Time: 07:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a harmless caterpillar or one that can kill trees?
I looked at 100s of green caterpillar photos to identify it and none look like this one
I’ve been having some tree problems and he was found in the area but I’m thinking not the culprit.  Maybe, maybe not.  Trying to decide if I should relocate him, as the gypsy moth virus/fungus is helping remove those caterpillars and it might be contagious
How you want your letter signed:  C

Linden Prominent Caterpillar

Dear C,
For the most part, native caterpillars are rarely a threat to native plants.  Introduced species like the Gypsy Moth have no natural enemies when they are introduced, which is why exotic imported species often threaten sensitive ecosystems.  We do not recognize your striking Caterpillar, and our initial internet investigation did not produce anything worth citing, so we are posting it as Unidentified and we are hoping our readers help us identify what we suspect is a Noctuoid Caterpillar.

Update:  Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we are confident this is a Linden Prominent Moth Caterpillar, Ellida caniplaga, which is pictured on BugGuideBugGuide notes “The larvae feed on the leaves of basswood (=linden)” and “The larvae are rarely seen (for many years the description of the caterpillar was not known) because they usually feed high in the canopy of basswood trees; they are most likely to be observed descending the trunk of the tree enroute to their pupation site in the soil.”

Thanks so much.  I do have a very tall linden tree nearby and this bug must’ve dropped from the top onto my deck.    Never seen one like it before
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentifiable Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  South Central PA
Date: 06/29/2019
Time: 08:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  No one seems to know what this bug is.
How you want your letter signed:  Mary Brady

Unknown Robber Fly

Dear Mary,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, and we thought it would be much easier to provide you with a species identification, but we are still uncertain regarding its identity.  It reminds us very much of  
Microstylum morosum which is pictured on BugGuide, but that species is only reported as far east as Missouri on BugGuide.  We will continue to research this matter.  How large was this individual?

Eric Eaton responds after we ask his input.
Daniel:
I got nothin’, sorry.  I would agree with your initial diagnosis, though.  I wonder if there is more to the story?
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination