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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Some good Assasin Bug bug photos
I don’t know if you need more photos of this dinosaur looking bug, but it looks like an Assassin Bug (Wheel Bug) I saw on your site. Enjoy. (BTW: I didn’t kill it).
Rhett

Hi Rhett,
This might be our favorite image of a Wheel Bug ever. The forced perspective makes it look enormous. A lower horizon line would make it look like it was about to trample unwary humans trying to flee the behemoth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

This thing is NASTY!
Please help me Identify this thing! I found it inside my house on the floor. Im thinking that it might have come in with a bunch of fireworks I had recently purchased! I appreciate your time and your help! Thanks!
Tyson Johnson
Salt Lake City, UT

Hi Tyson,
We are compelled to come to the defense of your Potato Bug or Jerusalem Cricket, and inform readers that they are not nasty. They are shy nocturnal underground dwellers that often appear inside homes and garages after a rain. They are normally one of our most common identification requests from the Western states, especially California. Our last posting was in January and we suspect the record low rainfall in California last year is responsible for low sightings recently.  Potato Bugs are also known as Ninos de la Tierra or Children of the Earth in Spanish and they are in the family Stenopelmatidae.  Potato Bugs do have strong mandibles and will bite, but they are not poisonous and in most cases will not even break the skin.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Eight Legs + Two Claws — Insect?
Hello,
I love your site. After my grandmother was attacked in Arkansas by a very aggressive, female, Dobson fly, my love of insects has only increased. Your site has provided hours of fantastic information and wonder. I finally found out what a house centipede was. But now I have an unknown, which I submit with pictures. I live in Minneapolis in an apartment building. Today I found crawling on my wall a fairly small, maybe 3-4 mm long, eight legged creature with an additional two large crab-like claws in the very front. Its body is very similar in shape and coloring to a cockroach nymph. The creature carries its claws in front of its body in much the same way a crab would, slightly extend and slightly raised. Additionally, the creature uses its claws in much the same way a crab would. It seems to regularly bring a claw to its mouth and “taste” what’s on the claw. Please review my photos and tell me what you think. I can’t seem to find anything on the net that even hints and what this might be. Thanks a million Bug Man!
PS – On closer inspection it appears this creature has no antennae.
Ellen

Hi Ellen,
This is not an insect, but an Arachnid. It is a harmless Pseudoscorpion.
Pseudoscorpions are quite harmless, but they are fierce predators if the prey is small enough for them to capture. They are known to catch and eat house flies much larger than themselves.  We get submissions of Pseudoscorpions from around the world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug on House — Please Help Identify
Bugs like the attached are all over my house. They can fly. Please help me identify them.
Thank you!

This is an Eastern Boxelder Bug, Boisea trivittata. We get so many identification requests in the fall that we have decided to make it the bug of the month for November. Boxelder Bugs are True Bugs with incomplete metamorphosis. The immature nymphs are wingless replicas of the adults, but appear more red as the wings are not covering the coloration on the abdomen. Boxelder Bugs are noteworthy in that they form large aggregations of nymphs and adults, and they seek shelter indoors as the weather cools. Turn to BugGuide for additional information. We have numerous advertisers who guarantee to exterminate them, but there are also several home remedies that have reported success rates.

Soap against Boxelder Bugs
(02/03/2005) A WAY TO ELIMINATE BOX ELDER
HELLO, I AM FROM NEW YORK STATE AND WE HAVE A VERY SERIOUS PROBLEM WITH THE BOX ELDER BEETLES. THEY ARE ALL OVER OUR TREES, OUR POOL DECK AND OUR HOME. OUR NEIGHBOR ONE DAY WAS DOING HER LAUNDRY AND SAW ONE IN THE BASEMENT SO SHE SPRAYED IT WITH A DETERGENT SOLUTION SHE HAD IN A BOTTLE. THE BEETLE DIED IN NO TIME. AFTER THAT WE WOULD FILL UP OUR 2 GALLON SPRAYERS AND PUT A CAP OR TWO OF LAUNDRY SOAP IN IT AND SPRAY THESE BEETLES. THEY DO DIE FROM THIS SOLUTION. THIS IS A CHEAP SOLUTION AND A NON TOXIC SOLUTION.
DEBBIE FENCLAU

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Identify hornet please.
My neighbors say it is a hornet and it looks like a big one but I have no idea what kind. My husband says it is a japanese hornet and can be dangerous around the kids. I plant a lot of plants for bees and wasp and they never bother us but the kids are now afraid to play outside because of these. If it is dangerous do I call an exterminator? I would hate to have to put chemicals in my yard. Thanks,
Heidi from Fort Mill, SC

Hi Heidi,
We love your photograph of Mating Cicada Killers, Sphecius speciosus. These large wasps are not aggressive, but they can sting. Tell your children to respect them and they will not be stung. They attack cicadas, not people.

Thank you so much for the information. I enjoyed doing research on my newly identified critter and educating the children on them. I actually take it as a compliment when “porch pets” choose my property so I can add another “porch pet” to my list. It makes sense also since I have been hearing cicada’s around lately. I also found one of these wasps dead across the street and have only seen one flying around since the picture was taken. Thanks again,
Heidi, Ft. Mill, SC

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Pair of Dobsonflies!!!
(06/29/2005)
What type of bug is this?
Hi. I was wondering if you could help identify these bugs
for me. I live in the Poconos region of Pennsylvania, about
45 miles west of Scranton. Based on the difference in body
sizes and how the pinchers look I’m guessing that they’re
most likey a male and a female. The one with the long crossed
pinchers is about four inches long (from the end of the wings
to the end of the pinchers), with two inch antennae and one
inch pinchers. The one with the short pinchers is about three
inches long, with one inch antannae and maybe 1/4 inch pinchers.
They’re both very docile and didn’t try to fly away when I
had them in the tupperware with the lid off.
Thanks!
Ben

A Pair of Dobsonflies

A Pair of Dobsonflies

Hi Ben,
We have been getting plenty of Dobsonfly photos lately and
when they are in season, we always try to keep a photo on
our homepage. We currently have several that you would have
seen had you scrolled down a bit. Your photo is exquisite
and will have a permanent spot at the top of our Dobsonfly
page. Your are correct in that they are male and femaLe of
the same species and the male has the long mandibles.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination