Currently viewing the tag: "Tomato Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar or no?
Location: Charleston, SC
August 21, 2017 12:19 pm
A friend of mine sent out this picture wondering what kind of bug this is. I know it looks like a type of caterpillar but not sure the name of it.
Signature: Monica

Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Monica,
Even though, because of the cage, we are presuming it is feeding on a tomato plant, this caterpillar is commonly called a Tobacco Hornworm.  Here is a BugGuide image.  It is the caterpillar of a Carolina Sphinx,
Manduca sexta.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug on tomato
Location: Sacramento, California
August 14, 2017 12:39 pm
Suddenly quite a few of these. On tomatoes only. Sacramento, California.
Signature: BugTomatoes

Mating Western Leaf Footed Bugs

Dear BugTomatoes,
These are mating Western Leaf Footed Bugs, and you do not want them proliferating on your tomatoes.  They have piercing mouthparts that suck fluids from plants, including ripe tomatoes.  They inject an enzyme that makes the fruit unpalatable to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sphinx moth or tomato?
Location: SW New Mexico – near Silvercity
February 7, 2017 9:01 am
Greetings, I thought this was a sphinx moth caterpillar but someone else suggested it was a tomato worm. BTW – there were definitely sphinx moths out the same day that I took this photo. But there was also a different kind of horn worm out there also.
Signature: Narglyph

Tomato Hornworm

Dear Narglyph,
Sphinx Moth Caterpillars and “Tomato Worms” are not mutually exclusive because several species of Sphinx Moths have larvae that feed on tomato and other plants in the family, and the larvae are known as Hornworms.  Your individual appears to be the dark form of
Manduca quinquemaculata, the Five Spotted Hawkmoth and its larva is known as the Tomato Hornworm which appears in both green and dark forms.  You can compare your individual to this very dark individual pictured on BugGuide.

Thanks – I took the photo a while ago and I didn’t get pictures of what it was feeding on. A friend is writing an archaeological report on sphinx moths and datura and wanted to make sure she was getting the photos labeled correctly. I will pass on the info to you.
marglyph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: South-eastern CT
July 30, 2016 2:41 pm
I found this green guy on a tomato plant. Should I be concerned about whether he will damage the plant? It’s the end of a hot sunny July.
Signature: Emily

Tobacco Hornworm

Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Emily,
Though they are frequently found eating the leaves of tomato plants (and other plants in the family including pepper and eggplant), the caterpillar of the Carolina Sphinx,
Manduca sexta, is commonly called a Tobacco Hornworm.  They will eat leaves and numerous Tobacco Hornworms may defoliate a small tomato plant.  They will also eat green tomatoes.  Many gardeners remove them.  We do not.  We suspect if you did not remove it, it is long gone, having dug beneath the surface of the ground to pupate.  We frequently received requests to identify the pupae of the Carolina Sphinx when gardeners discover them while turning the soil the following season.  The adult Carolina Sphinx is an impressive moth. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny green bristly larva
Location: NJ
May 29, 2016 3:03 pm
I live in NJ. This tiny green bristly larva of some kind was on a severely stressed tomato plant that had suffered tomato russet mite then aphid infestation when I decided to just plant it and let it survive or die.
I thought I should be able to recognize it, but am striking out with all my guesses. I would appreciate it very much if you could help.
I prefer to let the Garden Patrol take care of the pest issues, so I err on the side of the living — Not knowing what it was, I left it on the plant. (I found a ladybug larva on another plant)
Signature: Garden Patrol Squad Leader

Buffalo Treehopper Nymph

Buffalo Treehopper Nymph

Dear Garden Patrol Squad Leader,
This is the nymph of a Buffalo Treehopper in the genus
Ceresa which you can verify by comparing to this BugGuide image.  While they might not do too much damage to your plant, they do have mouths designed to pierce and suck fluids from the plant, which in the case of an already stressed tomato plant, does not seem like it will be doing the plant much good.

Yikes!  that being the case, I will have to deploy a proper member of the Garden Patrol to protect that plant.  Perhaps a treehopper nymph will be appreciated as a tasty assignment bonus.  ^_^
Thank you for a speedy response! Much appreciated.  :o)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large green catapiller
Location: waukesha wi
August 5, 2015 5:34 pm
found this guy munching away on my tomato plants. He cleaned a few branches bare so I relocated him. Roughly 3 inches long, 3/4 wide.
Signature: Wi gardener

Tobacco Hornworm

Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Wi gardener,
This is a Tobacco Hornworm,
Manduca sexta, one of two species of related caterpillars that are frequently found feeding on the leaves of tomatoes and related plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination