Currently viewing the tag: "snow bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs in snow (not fleas)
Location: Southeast Michigan
February 5, 2017 5:46 pm
Hi, we have swarms of these bugs in the snow around our house. My kids and I have scoured the internet, but we can’t find any information to identify them. My kids were so excited to have of our pictures featured on your site years ago when they were little of a cicada killer. Please help us again!! Thank you!
Signature: Lundy family

Snowfly

Dear Lundy Family,
We are thrilled to post your image of a Snowfly or Small Winter Stonefly in the family Capniidae, the first of the season, though we did just create our Snow Bugs tag for creatures active in winter months.  According to BugGuide:  “adults often seen on snow, or resting on concrete bridges over streams.”  We suspect you are not in an industrial part of Michigan because Stonefly larvae are aquatic and they are generally only found in moving water like streams that are not polluted.

Cool, we are in the country, and have a large creek flowing through our property.  Thanks!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Bridger Mountains, Montana
January 24, 2017 4:00 pm
This bug was found outside of Bozeman, Montana, in the Gallatin National Forest. A nordic skier was skiing down an unplowed road and saw the bug walking on top of the snow. Nearby tree species include Douglas-fir, Engelmann spruce, lodgepole pine, and subalpine fir.
Signature: Johanna Nosal

Snow Sedge

Dear Johanna,
This is a Caddisfly, an insect in the order Trichoptera that is generally found near a source of fresh, clean water because their larvae are aquatic nymphs sometimes called Caseworms because they build protective covers from sticks, stones or shells.  It is our understanding that Caddisflies found in the snow are known as Snow Sedges.  We found this reference to a Snow Sedge on BugGuide, however the information page for the genus on BugGuide does not indicate Snow Sedge is a common name.  TroutNet does identify Snow Sedges and has this to report:  “These caddisflies may be important to the winter angler because they are one of the only insects around.”  Your posting has inspired us to create a “Snow Bugs” tag because we have numerous postings in our archive of insects in the snow, though it was not until now that we decided to organize them together into a dedicated data base.

Caddisfly in the Snow

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly Alaska
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
July 11, 2016 1:08 pm
My daughter and I found this butterfly floating through our backyard. I think they are attracted to all of our flowers and flowering trees and shrubs. I also think they like some of the water than gets sprayed all over the yard by my toddler. I love butterflies and usually only see the yellow swallowtails. I’ve never seen one like this before. (Taken in Anchorage ,Alaska May 2016)
Signature: MsRobin

Mourning Cloak

Mourning Cloak

Dear MsRobin,
This lovely butterfly is a Mourning Cloak, and we doubt it is attracted to the flowers in your yard.  Mourning Cloaks are more unusual in their dietary preferences.  They prefer rotting fruit and sap oozing from trees to nectar derived from blossoms.  Mourning Cloaks are also among the most long lived butterflies because those that mature toward the end of summer will hibernate as adults.  They are known to fly about on sunny winter days while there is still snow on the ground to search for tree sap.  We would love to have you submit images of your Alaskan Swallowtails as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Alaska bug care
Website:
March 21, 2016 12:50 am
My family is a new fan of your website, team, and especially Mr. Marlos! After coming across a cocooned caterpillar question that was nearly identical to our experience (Kenai peninsula, AK) a 5 hour drive from Anchorage, AK where the similar story took place 2 years ago very near the same period of season the other discovery was made. I realized we have no understanding of how to care for this bug. I’m not convinced whether it made a cocoon in our Tupperware over night of if it simply has an interesting way of dying. However I, too, am not a fan of killing bugs. So I’m hoping you may have information on how to provide care for this bug until it either erupts from it’s possible cocooned state. Or shows an undeniable death. Please feel free to contact us in any way!! We absolutely adore what you are doing with this site!! Sincerely,
Sheeara & Marshall Woodward
(Mom & 8 year old Son)
Soldotna, Ak 99669
(Just in case you want to google map is and see where this little guy came from 😉 or.. hint hint hint… Allow us to be honored by purchasing a signed copy of The Curious World of Bugs.
Signature: Sheeara Woodward

Dear Sheeara & Marshall,
After conversing with you yesterday, we were compelled to go back through our old emails to search for your request.  As you noted, Alaskan submissions to our site are relatively uncommon.  We are happy to learn that you were eventually treated to the emergence of the adult “red moth” and since you have images, we would love to include them in our posting, and hopefully provide you with a species identification.  Please attach your images to this response.  We would be honored to sign a copy of The Curious World of Bugs if you send a copy our way.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper identification
Location: Pearsoll Peak, Kalmiopsis Wilderness, OR
March 21, 2016 10:05 am
Hi, I took photos of this grasshopper thawing in a snowbank at 4,000 feet elevation on 3/17/16. Located at Pearsoll Peak, Kalmiopsis Wilderness, SW Oregon. Its armor is camouflaged to the landscape of the area as there are a lot of sage plants & serpentine/chrome ore outcroppings of that color. Thanks!
Signature: Will

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Dear Will,
We haven’t the time to research the identity of your Grasshopper at this time, but we are posting the images.  Perhaps our readership can assist.  We will also contact Eric Eaton to get his opinion.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Eric Eaton Responds
Daniel:
That is a nymph (juvenile, immature, “baby”) of a band-winged grasshopper, subfamily Oedipodinae in the Acrididae family.  I cannot make a more specific ID.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black beetle walking on the snow
Location: Wilmington, MA
February 10, 2016 1:54 pm
Wondering what kind of bug this is. We are in Massachusetts, north of Boston. It is February 10, ~3:30pm, ~35 degrees F, cloudy, very light snow falling intermittently.
Signature: Kim Rose

Ground Beetle, we believe

Ground Beetle, we believe

Dear Kim,
There is not enough detail to be certain, but we believe this is a Ground Beetle in the family Carabidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination