Currently viewing the tag: "Make My Day"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs in snow (not fleas)
Location: Southeast Michigan
February 5, 2017 5:46 pm
Hi, we have swarms of these bugs in the snow around our house. My kids and I have scoured the internet, but we can’t find any information to identify them. My kids were so excited to have of our pictures featured on your site years ago when they were little of a cicada killer. Please help us again!! Thank you!
Signature: Lundy family

Snowfly

Dear Lundy Family,
We are thrilled to post your image of a Snowfly or Small Winter Stonefly in the family Capniidae, the first of the season, though we did just create our Snow Bugs tag for creatures active in winter months.  According to BugGuide:  “adults often seen on snow, or resting on concrete bridges over streams.”  We suspect you are not in an industrial part of Michigan because Stonefly larvae are aquatic and they are generally only found in moving water like streams that are not polluted.

Cool, we are in the country, and have a large creek flowing through our property.  Thanks!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar South Africa
Location: Southern S.Africa west coast near Cape Town
December 13, 2015 1:36 pm
Hi…
Whilst jogging on the west coast of the southern cape in South Africa I found this giant caterpillar crawling across the road. Its colours were truly astounding to me. No idea what species – or even whether it is a moth or butterfly.
Any help would be amazing!
Giovanna
Signature: Giovanna

Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Dear Giovanna,
The dayglow red, green and blue colors on this Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar,
Nudaurelia cytherea, are quite impressive.  Though we don’t normally link to Wikipedia, that popular site states it is:  “commonly known as the … christmas caterpillar due to its festive colouration.”  Your images, including the close-up showing the prolegs, are quite beautiful and they really made our day.

Close-up of the prolegs of the Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Close-up of the prolegs of the Pine Emperor Moth Caterpillar

Wow… That is super cool! Thank you. I sent in another submission of a more mysterious creature – what may be a larval lady bug. Also from Cape Town. I would LOVE to know what you thought of that.
Thank you so very much. This is an amazing service!!!
Giovanna Fasanelli

We forgot to mention that your Christmas Caterpillars are reported to be edible.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mantids, cicadas, grasshoppers galore
Location: Texas Panhandle near Palo Duro Canyon
November 21, 2015 11:00 pm
Hey Bugman!
We had a ridiculously wet winter and spring this year in the Texas Panhandle, so there was basically a plague of bugs and amphibians through the summer and fall. The variety blew my mind! I was sorting through my photos and picked a few of my favorites to share with the WTB community. I feel fairly confident about the species of mantids, the Carolina, Chinese and European, but I have no idea about the grasshoppers or cicadas.
Signature: Brittani Hinders

Carolina Mantids, male in the middle.

Carolina Mantids, male in the middle.

Good Evening Brittani,
Your image of the trio of Mantids on your hand with that rock is just about the most stunning Buggy Accessory image we have ever received.  We promote friendly interactions between insects and people and we like the idea of live insects as occasional fashion accessories, but not in a commercial way.  This image really made the day of our editorial staff.
We actually believe all three individual in the image are of the same species,
Stagmomantis carolina, based on images we found posted to BugGuide where it states:  “Head and thorax almost as long as the body. Antennae about half as long as middle legs. Pale green to brownish grey, often inconspicuous on vegetation. Males usually brown, females green or brown. Wings do not extend to tip of abdomen, especially in female. (Females apparently flightless, or nearly so.) Abdomen of female strongly widened in middle. Tegmina (outer wings) are broad, reaching apical third of the abdomen, with a stigmatic (dark) black patch.”  This BugGuide identification trait “The facial shield (plate below antennal insertion and between the eyes) is relatively long and narrow in Stagmomantis, more squarish in Tenodera sinensis” is especially evident in the green individual in your image who resembles this BugGuide image.  The victimized male in that image and the one represented in this BugGuide image look like the slender individual perched on your middle finger.  Finally the third individual positioned on your pinkie looks like this brown female posted to BugGuide.
We really need to split your submission into three distinct postings, as we want to create numerous links to accommodate your sly tactic of increasing the number of image files that can be attached to the submission form.  Additionally, multiple insect orders or families in the same submission is out of harmony with our archiving aesthetic.  More later.

Thank you so much! Seeing my photos on WTB makes MY day, I’m really thrilled that you guys enjoyed the mantids. I’m also happy to be wrong. It hadn’t occurred to me that so much variety could come from one species, and that in itself is just as good as finding three different kinds. I’ve attached a few more shots for your amusement. They were quite good little models! Although, mantids are my favorite bugs, so my opinion might be a little biased.
As for the Spotted Bird grasshopper, I think you’re definitely right about them faking being toxic. Either that or my dogs, who spent all summer catching and chowing down on them, have iron stomachs. They weren’t the most prevalent hoppers out in the yard, but they certainly were the largest.
Looking forward to hearing about the cicadas! It was lovely hearing them sing from the tops of our locust trees. One of the loudest summers ever! They were still surprisingly difficult to spot despite how many there must have been.
Thanks again! You guys rock. I threw in a couple bonus photos of a jumping spider eating a black widow.
-Brittani

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wheelie
Location: West Tennessee
November 17, 2015 2:48 pm
Ahh at last. I moved to Western Tennessee over a year and a half ago. One thing I hoped to see was a wheel bug. This spring my boyfriend picked flowers from outside and put them on the plate with some eggs and served me breakfast in bed. He was surprised that I was more interested in the assassin bug nymph (I think it was a wheel bug) that was crawling on the flowers.
Today I found one. Our weather has been in the 70’s until this week and many of the bugs are still around. I found this guy or girl? walking on the side of our shop this morning. It was cool today so it was moving in slow motion. It’s sad that it won’t live much longer, but at least I got a nice picture. I also resisted the urge to pick it up as much as I wanted to since I hear than can have a nasty bite.
Signature: Jess

Wheel Bug

Wheel Bug

Dear Jess,
We never tire of posting great images of Wheel Bugs and your image is quite nice.  Your written account is quite charming as well.  It is so nice to read a thoughtfully composed submission.  We get so tired of posting terse, grammatically horrifying, demanding queries texted out on a cellular telephone, so your posting really made our day.  We need a Make My Day tag, though we can’t imagine our day being made every day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination