Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help with Bug ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Vila Velha, Brazil
Your letter to the bugman:  I am six years old and living in Brazil for a year.  I rescued this interesting bug from a swimming pool and want to know what it is.  My dad is helping me type this message.  Thank you for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  From Nadia F.

Darkling Beetle

Dear Nadia,
This is a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae.  Because of your kind act of rescuing this Darkling Beetle from a swimming pool, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug (moth?) identification
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Pennsylvania
Date: 08/27/2018
Time: 11:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have never seen this bug before in our yard and I would appreciate if you can identify it.
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Andrei N.

Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Andrei,
This is an invasive Spotted Lanternfly,
Lycorma delicatula, a species introduced to Pennsylvania from Asia several years ago.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to China, India, Japan and Vietnam; invasive in Korea and in our area. Currently (2018) known from 6 counties in PA; also found in DE, NY, VA” and “SIGHTING REPORTS WANTED: Experts are working to delimit the current population and find new infestations of this species. Please report sightings on the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture website.  earliest NA record: PA 2014.”  This is a winged adult.  Nymphs are wingless and may have bright red coloration.  You should report your sighting to help prevent the Spotted Lanternfly from spreading further in North America.  

Spotted Lanternfly

Hello Daniel,
Thank you. I will alert the PA Dept. of Agriculture.
Andrei

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Little Stinkers
Geographic location of the bug:  Andover, NJ
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 03:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Daniel,
Just a share.  I found a little cluster of what I believe to be Marmolated Stink Bugs on a hibiscus plant and have been keeping an eye on them.  At first they move around together like a little battalion – very cute.  Today, however, they molted and started setting out on their own.  All were black except one that is white.  I thought that was odd, but read here that sometimes freshly molted nymphs of this species are white, so assume that is what it is.  I am attached a couple of photos showing both color variations as well as one of a nymph inspecting the exuvia, almost as if to say “I can’t believe I used to fit into that thing.”
Hope you are having a great, buggy weekend.
How you want your letter signed:  Deborah Bifulco

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug nymph

Hi Deborah,
Based on this BugGuide image, your nymphs are in the second instar phase, meaning they have molted once since hatching.  They change and get larger after each molt.

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug nymphs

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug nymphs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please identify this green bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Gun Flint Trail in Northern Minnesota
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 03:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was standing on a dock by a lake for just a few minutes and after I got back in the car I felt something crawling in my hair. I found this green bug. He crawled but I never saw him fly so I am not sure if he could or not. I took this picture of it before letting it go back outside.
How you want your letter signed:  Jayne Pietsch

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Dear Jayne,
As you can see from this BugGuide image, you encountered a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus formosus.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe (widespread there), adventive in NA, established in the northeast” and it feed on “primarily Yellow Birch.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Wales LL38 2PX
Date: 08/14/2018
Time: 04:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a huntsman? It was in my tissue box one morning .
How you want your letter signed:  L.morton

Harvestman: Dicranopalpus ramosus

Dear L.morton,
This is not a spider.  It is a Harvestman,
Dicranopalpus ramosus, in the order Opiliones, and it is an introduced species in the U.K.  According to NatureSpot:  “The species has spread across Europe from Morocco. As early as 1957, it was reported in Bournemouth in southern England, from where it spread. It reached Scotland in 2000.”  This might be a symptom of global warming.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ants in LA
Geographic location of the bug:  West Hollywood Hills above Sunset Plaza
Date: 08/08/2018
Time: 11:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  For 25 years, on the hotter days through summer, my home  was invaded by lines of ants (medium-sized black, perhaps Argentine) apparently seeking water. The past 2-3 years this has greatly diminished. This year, so far, despite (or perhaps because of) record heat, all I’ve seen are two tiny black ants.  Is this phenomenon widespread in LA?
How you want your letter signed:  Keith

No Argentine Ants

Hi Keith,
Our jealously has no bounds.  First, we are almost certain the Ants in question are Argentine Ants.  Have you moved to drought tolerant landscaping recently?  Argentine Ants cannot survive without water, and the reason they invade homes during the heat of summer is for both food and water.  Unlike you, we had two Argentine Ant invasions in our own offices just yesterday with 1000s of Ants swarming the cat food.  Our Mount Washington neighborhood is not as lucky as your West Hollywood digs this year, and in talking to our neighbors, they are also experiencing a higher incident of Ant home invasions this year.

Argentine Ants invading WTB? offices

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination