Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Beetle
Location: Northern edge of Pottstown, PA
July 16, 2017 9:47 am
Sort of a weevil shaped insect, bright red/orange and black with bright white spots on body and legs.
I’ve never seen one of these before, and can’t find one on the web searching several sites. Do you know what it is? Since I can’t find it in searches, wondering if it’s an introduced species. Found it on our deck post afternoon of July 15, 2017. My property has a small woods on two sides.
Signature: Olin Mittan

Immature Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Olin,
This is not a good sighting.  Years ago we identified this Asian creature as an immature White Cicada, and upon searching BugGuide records, we learned it is called a Spotted Lanternfly and “native to China, India, Japan and Vietnam; invasive in Korea and in our area (PA; confirmed in Berks Co. Sep 2014)” and “SIGHTING REPORTS WANTED: Experts are working to delimit the current population and find new infestations of this species. Please report sightings on the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture website.”

Immature Spotted Lanternfly

Thanks for the quick response.  It turns out that the spotted lanternfly is known to exist in my township, and I was simply unaware.  We are instructed simply to kill any we encounter, but I reported it none the less.
Had it now been for your site, and response, I would still be unaware of the threat.
Thanks again for your help.
Olin Mittan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on dill
Location: Southern Michigan
July 11, 2017 3:57 pm
I found these living on my dill plants, any ideas? They are pretty small, about as long as a grain of rice maybe and so far ive found 3. I live in southeastern michigan. And its summer here right now.
Signature: Thank you

Carrot Seed Caterpillar on Dill

We have not had any luck identifying your caterpillar.  The only caterpillars we can find associated with dill in Eastern North America is the Black Swallowtail Caterpillar, and your caterpillar is most definitely not a Black Swallowtail Caterpillar.  Your caterpillar does remind us of the Sophora Worm, but they feed on legumes and dill is not a legume.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize this caterpillar.

Ive talked to another girl I know and she said its called a purple carrot seed caterpillar/moth.  Ever heard of those?

The Carrot Seed Caterpillar pictured on BugGuide does appear correct.  According to BugGuide:  “The larvae feed on umbellifers, particularly wild carrot” and “‘Recently introduced into North America (first specimen reported from 2002) and now known from Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin’. * (information from – Moth Photographers Group). “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Northern lower michigan
July 12, 2017 5:07 pm
I planted a butterfly garden and today I found this little bugger tucked in between some leaves. Of coarse my concern is could he damage my milkweed or harm any eggs larvae or caterpillars? Is he ok or does he need to move it along?
Thank you,
Signature:  May Cross
Petoskey Michigan

Japanese Beetle

Dear May,
This is a Japanese Beetle, an Invasive Exotic species that is generally reviled among rose growers and other gardeners.  According to BugGuide:  “native to E. Asia, introduced in N. Amer. (NJ 1916, with nursery stock)” and “Larvae feed on roots of many plants. Adults feed on foliage, flowers and fruits of various plants. ”  While they damage and defoliate many landscaping plants including roses, rose of sharon, grapes and fruit trees, we doubt they will trouble your milkweed as it has a noxious sap that causes most insects to avoid feeding on the leaves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: about 20 of them apear dead each morning.
Location: Cuermavaca Morelos Mexico
July 3, 2017 12:05 pm
Hello , just wondering what this bug is.
Thanks for your help
Signature: Fernando

Lawn Shrimp

Dear Fernando,
These are terrestrial Amphipods commonly called Lawn Shrimp or Househoppers, and they are an invasive species introduced from Australia.  According to BugGuide:  “
These are rarely seen except when flooding or lack of moisture forces them to abandon their home in the soil in search for suitable conditions. At such times they often end up dieing on pavement or in homes and become a nuisance. Once they start appearing, there’s not much that can be done except to sweep them up- pesticides are pointless, bcause by then they’re already dying or dead.  The best solution is to keep the numbers down the rest of the year by keeping the soil from staying too moist- in California, especially, they’re a sign of overwatering. Physical barriers like weather-stripping can also help to keep them out of homes, but their bodies are flat and narrow, allowing them to slip through surprisingly narrow cracks.  Non-native; introduced probably from Australia along with blue-gum eucalyptus trees in the 1800s. First recorded in San Francisco, CA in 1967.

Daniel, thank you very much for the information , indeed they look like small shrimp!!!!
I greatly appreciate your time.
Regards.
Fernando

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Dangerous Spider – Sure looks like it to me
Location: West Los Angeles
July 10, 2017 5:39 pm
Hi Bugman,
As much as I love butterflies, I don’t get along with spiders. Can you please let me know if this one is dangerous?
These are the best pics Icould take, but if you enlarge them the spider is quite visible.
Thanks,
Signature: Jeff Bremer

Brown Widow and Egg Sac

Dear Jeff,
Both the Brown Widow Spider and her egg sac which are pictured in your image are quite recognizable.  According to BugGuide:  “The brown widow is highly variable in color. It may be almost white to almost black. Typically, it is a light to medium brown, with an orange-to-yellow hourglass marking on the underside of the abdomen; the coloration of the hourglass often is a good indication of this species. The leg segments are banded, with one half of each segment lighter in color than the other half. The back often has a row of white spots (rarely orange or light blue), and there are a few white stripes on each side. Darker individuals lack these markings and are difficult to distinguish from black widows. If an eggsac is present, this is the best identifying characteristic. Brown widow eggsacs are tan, spherical, and have many small tufts of silk sticking out from them. They resemble a ‘sandspur.’ The other widows make white, smooth eggsacs that tend to be pear-shaped. ” BugGuide also provides this information:  ” Widow Bites:  NOTE: It is recognized that this particular species of widow is most likely not medically significant (not an immediate medical concern to those who are bitten). The brown widow produces clinical effects similar to that of the black widow but the typical symptoms and signs being milder and tending to be restricted to the bite site and surrounding tissues. (Print Ref 1)  Brown widow spiders usually curl up into a ball, and drop to the ground as a primary defense. It is highly recommended that people leave this spider alone; observe, but don’t touch.  The brown widow is an extremely timid spider which has rarely been reported to bite.”  The Brown Widow is a non-native, introduced species that has gotten quite common in Southern California as well as the entire southern portion of the U.S.

Thanks Daniel,
It’s hard to know when to be worried and when not.
Jeff

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help me identify this bug
Location: SoCal
July 7, 2017 10:13 pm
We get about 100 of these on our patio at night. They fly around like they are on drugs.
Signature: Thank you very much, adrianne

Glassywinged Sharpshooter

Dear Adrianne,
This Leafhopper is a Glassywinged Sharpshooter,
Homalodisca vitripennis, and according to BugGuide the range is  “se. US (TX-FL-NC-AR) & Mexico(1), introduced in sw. US (CA-AZ)” making it an invasive species in Southern California.  BugGuide also remarks:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, southeastern US. This species was accidentally introduced into so. California in the early 1990s, probably with ornamental or agricultural stock. There, it has become a serious threat to viticulture.(2The biggest problem is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.”

Glassywinged Sharpshooter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination