Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pennsylvania bug
Location: Northeastern Pennsylvania
January 15, 2017 9:33 pm
Washing dishes in my kitchen when this bug buzzed loudly across the room and dive bombed into the water. Water was hot so he didn’t make it. Never saw one before, abdomen has an odd concave shape. Black (or dark brown?) with yellow markings. What is this bug?
Signature: Debbie

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Debbie,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug is a species native to the Pacific Northwest that greatly expanded its range across North America beginning in the 1960s.  Western Conifer Seed Bugs often seek shelter indoors to hibernate when the weather cools, which is probably why you found it in your kitchen.

Thank you so much for your help!  I have been bombarded with “stink bugs” this year more than ever!!!  Asian lady bugs are everywhere as well. They are driving me crazy!!!!  So when this new looking bug landed in my sink, I thought, “Here we go again!”  Thank you for identifying it for me. I refer to your site often!  It’s a fantastic reference!!!
Btw….is there any kind of deterrent for any of the above mentioned bugs?  I do not want to spray to kill, I just wish I could discourage them out of our living space better. Our home is an 1815 farmhouse and we are trying to seal up as much as we can. Any advice would be helpful.
Again, thank you for the ID on the bug. I will continue to reference your very informative site!  Have a great day!
Debbie

Hi again Debbie,
Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs, Multi-Colored Asian Lady Beetles and Western Conifer Seed Bugs are all introduced species in your area, and they probably have no natural enemies, hence their ability to proliferate, and they are most likely here to stay.  Short of sealing your house better, we cannot provide any additional deterrents. 

Thanks very much!  Then we will continue to do that!!  Again, j appreciate your help and will continue to enjoy your site!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Name that bug!
Location: Vancouver WA
January 12, 2017 9:23 pm
This moth (?) evidently came in on the firewood. What kind of bug is this ? I could not find an image on the internet but I don’t know what search words to use.
Signature: Kurious Jo

Introduced Pine Sawfly

Dear Kurious Jo,
Based on this BugGuide image, we feel quite confident this is a male Introduced Pine Sawfly,
Diprion similis.  According to BugGuide:  “adventive from Europe; ne. US (ME-MN to NC-TN) + WA; in Canada, NF-MB & BC.”  We first reported the larvae in Washington in 2008.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual pink bug in Johannesburg South Africa
Location: South Africa, Johannesburg
January 4, 2017 1:24 pm
Hi, love your site thank you for the interesting and informative info you post. I live in the country side just outside Johannesburg, South Africa. It is mid summer here and my son noticed this very unusual bug on the wall in the house. At first we thought it was one bug which had a an upper pink portion with a black end disguised to look like a head too but when we out it in a bottle to take it outside we noticed that it was in fact two bugs and the pink bug was pushing a half digested black. If out its anterior end! Can’t find any info on this and was hoping you could tell is what this bug is?
Signature: Tracy

Newly Metamorphosed Stink Bug might be Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Tracy,
The albino-like coloration of this Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an indication that it just emerged from its cast off nymphal exoskeleton.  The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an invasive, exotic species originally from Asia that has spread across North America in a very short period of time.

Retraction:  January 19, 2017
Though this is a newly metamorphosed Stink Bug, we cannot state for certain that it is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.  Thanks to Curious Girl for pointing out to us that there are no known reports of Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs in South Africa.  The Invasive Species Compendium does not list sightings in South Africa.  We based our identification on the striped antennae which are distinctive in the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.  This may be a first reported sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug
Location: Gainesville, FL
December 13, 2016 9:34 am
I found this swarm of little bugs after trying to watery cactus. There’s was thousands of them! All over the cactus! I don’t know what they are. Can you help? They were livingin the soul and carrying either eggs or larvae when I disturbed them.
Signature: Trevor Forrest

Booklice

Booklice or Ghost Ants

Dear Trevor,
The behavior you describe, “carrying either eggs or larvae when I disturbed them”, implies they are social insects like Ants, but the image you provided appears more like Booklice in the genus
Liposcelis which is pictured on BugGuide.  Alas, two of your attached images are too blurry to ascertain any details, and the third image does not provide a large enough view to be certain.  According to BugGuide, Booklice are found:  “worldwide and across NA; many spp. are now nearly cosmopolitan or otherwise widely spread through agency of man, mostly with stored products(” and their habitat is “under bark, in ant nests, in homes” which makes sense based on your account.  Booklice are considered benign unless they are plentiful enough to present a nuisance, or if they infest stored food products.  Since you seem pretty certain they were transporting eggs and larvae, we suspect they are most likely Ghost Ants, Tapinoma melanocephalum, which are also pictured on BugGuide and according to BugGuide:  “native to the Old World tropics, adventive elsewhere; in our area, established in FL (expanding) and reached TX in mid-1990s (prob. through Galveston on a shipment of plants from FL); infestations reported in many areas as far north as MB, but in cooler areas the ant can only survive indoors (greenhouses, etc.)”  We would favor the Ghost Ant ID.  If you get better images, please submit them.  Because we will be away from the office during the holidays, we are postdating your submission to go live at the end of the month.

Booklice

Booklice or Ghost Ants

Thank you for the info. I’m not quite sure they are either. I tried to get better pictures,  but they were moving really fast and everything came out blurry. I looked now and they are all back from where they came in the soil of the cactus. They did leave behind a bunch tiny white balls on the surface though.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Rancho Cucamonga, CA
December 14, 2016 3:35 pm
Mr. Bugman;
These guys showed up a couple of weeks ago and number in the thousands.
Can you tell me what it is? Of course you can! You’re the Bugman!
Signature: Jimi Streets

African Cluster Bug

African Cluster Bug

Dear Jimi Streets,
Though we immediately recognized your insect as a Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae, we did not recognize the species, but that changed as soon as we located this image of an African Cluster Bug,
Agonoscelis puberula, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the range is “mostly sw US (BG data) native to e. & so. Africa, introduced and established in the New World (so. US, Mexico, West Indies) since ca. 1985” and “earliest record in our area: AZ 1990.”  Your submission represents a new species on our site unless this posting from just last month turns out to truly be an African Cluster Bug.  According to Texas Invasives:  “Agonoscelis puberula are usually found in large groups and are rarely found individually or in pairs. It is an important indication if one has been located because there are likely hundreds more nearby. An individual seed of horehound may contain a cluster of 30 adult African Cluster Bugs.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?
Location: Southern California, USA
December 7, 2016 10:56 pm
Hello, I live in Southern California, and these little critters have been sneaking into my house every once in a while. I think it is some type of beetle, but I’m just not sure, so I wanted to get a second opinion!
Signature: Bree

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Bree,
The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug is an Invasive Exotic species that was accidentally introduced to North America in 1998 when it was first found in Maryland.  It has since spread across North America.  In addition to being an agricultural pest that feeds on hundreds of different plant species, it is a nuisance when it enters homes to hibernate when the weather begins to cool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination