Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  ID assistance – striped beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Florida
Date: 11/16/2017
Time: 04:10 PM EDT
Hi, I found this today near some leaf damage on a variety of holly – Ilex attenuata “Eagleston”
Never seen one before. Any idea? Thank you!
Nov. 16, 2017 – Central FL
How you want your letter signed:  Frank

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Frank,
This is an introduced Diaprepes Root Weevil,
Diaprepes abbreviatus, and according to BugGuide it is:  “color highly variable (from gray to yellow to orange to black)” and “highly polyphagous; larvae feed on roots, adults on foliage of citrus trees (esp. oranges in TX) and almost 300 other plant species.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Brown Marmorated Stinkbug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Puget Sound, WA State
Date: 11/01/2017
Time: 08:07 PM EDT
Hello! Thanks for maintaining this cool and informative site! I saw what I think is a Brown Marmorated Stinkbug at my home in a suburb South of Seattle. It’s the second one this year, and I saw one last year as well. Can you possibly confirm? And if it is a Halyomorpha halys, should I report it to my state agricultural authority? I know they are known in Eastern Washington, but I’m not sure about the Puget Sound area. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Jason

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Jason,
This is indeed an invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug.  The species has spread so far, so quickly in North America (see BugGuide data map) that it has begun posing a serious threat to some agricultural crops and many ornamental plants and fruits and vegetables in home gardens.  Contacting your state agricultural authority at this time is probably not necessary.  We know the species is most likely here to stay.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified bug on sheet hanging on clothesline
Geographic location of the bug:  Kailua Kona, Hawaii
Date: 10/26/2017
Time: 02:55 AM EDT
Please can anyone id this bug? Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Kathy Shivel

Albizia Longhorned Beetle

Dear Kathy,
This is a Longicorn or Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and our money is on it being an introduced species.  We quickly located this image of the
Coptops aedificator on the Worldwide Cerambycidae Photo Gallery where its range is listed as:  “Arabia, Africa, S. Helena, S. Thomé, Cabo Verde, Madagascar, Comores, Seychelles, Mauritius, Ceylon, India, Andaman. Introduced in China (Taiwan) and Hawaii.”  Previously we have  identified the Albizia Longhorned Beetle in Hawaii.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Huge wasp out at night! What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Northeastern Pennsylvania
Date: 10/23/2017
Time: 10:50 PM EDT
Hello, For the last two months or so we have been seeing one or two of these massive wasps out at night, hanging around our porch light. Once or twice one has come at me when I am in the back yard with the flashlight. They are at least 1.5 inches long.
I can’t figure out what it is because all of my searches yield people insisting they are giant Asian hornets, which they obviously are not. Can you ID this? Do you know why it is active at night? (My guess is they are hunting the bugs around our porch light, but is that normal?) Are they aggressive?
How you want your letter signed:  Laura Recene

European Hornet

Dear Laura,
This is an introduced European Hornet, and your report is not the first we have received of them being attracted to lights at night.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults come to lights.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Type of bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Los Angeles
Date: 10/18/2017
Time: 06:04 PM EDT
Found this bug on the main stem of my woody plant. What is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Abel Z.

African Painted Bug

Dear Abel,
This is
Bagrada hilaris, the African Painted Bug, a recently introduced, invasive Stink Bug that is normally found on plants in the cabbage family, including wild mustard.  Daniel first found African Painted Bugs in his own vegetable garden in 2009, a year after they were first reported as an Invasive Species.  According to BugGuide:  “2008 – CA – earliest NA record: Los Angeles Co., CA 2008” and “hosts on members of the mustard, nightshade, mallow, legume, sunflower and grain families, causes substantial damage to cruciferous crops such as broccoli, cabbage, mustards, and cauliflower, as well as infests a wide range of other crops and weeds species (Palumbo and Natwick 2010). It has become a serious agricultural pest in the sw US.”  It seems the hemp family Cannabaceae can be added to the list of plant families affected by this “serious agricultural pest.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unidentified flying bug
Geographic location of the bug:  San Mateo, CA
Date: 10/16/2017
Time: 01:37 PM EDT
I found this bug sitting on the ceiling of our livingroom… I cupped I and brought it outside. After I took pictures, it crawled quickly out of the cup and flew away. It looked very similar to a lady bug. Is it similar? Can you tell what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Kelley

Eucalyptus Leaf Beetle

Dear Kelley,
This looks to us like a Eucalyptus Leaf Beetle,
Chrysophtharta m-fuscum, a species we learned to identify when we found some munching on the eucalyptus tree around the corner from our Mount Washington offices.  According to the Center for Invasive Species Research:  “Eucalyptus leaf beetle is a new pest of ornamental eucalyptus and was introduced from Australia into southern California around 2003. It is not controlled by native parasites or predators. In Australia it is commonly known as one of the eucalyptus tortoise beetle species.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination