Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Need a a bug identified
Geographic location of the bug:  Unoted States
Date: 02/10/2018
Time: 07:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I purchased a motorhome and it is infested with these bugs,  can you please help?
How you want your letter signed:  Michelle

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Michelle,
The invasive Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, a species native to Asia, has naturalized throughout much of North America in the last decade.  Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs often seek shelter indoors to hibernate when weather begins to cool.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico – Semi desertic weather
Date: 02/09/2018
Time: 12:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I found this dead bug inside my house, to me, looks like a cockroach or related but I am no expert at all, can you identify? Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Victor

Harlequin Cockroach

Dear Victor,
This is a Cockroach, and it does not look to us like a species that infests homes.  We found a matching image on Angelfire on a page devoted to Cockroaches kept as pets where it is identified as a Harlequin Cockroach,
Neostylopyga rhombifolia, and the following information is provided:  “The Harlequin roach is certainly among the neatest looking of the pet roaches and is a very quick moving medium sized species. Nymphs start out life as a plain tan color but slowly molt to become very incredible looking adults. Harlequin roaches easily scale smooth surfaces and like most other glass climbers can be controlled by petroleum jelly. This is an egg laying species and fertility is sometimes a problem. Cultures either boom or bust so it is easy to rear a lot of specimens and easy for the culture to wipe out.”  The site also notes it is found in “Asia, Mexico, AZ (U.S.A.)” but the country of origin is not indicated.  BugGuide has no images, but does state “Circumtropical, of Asian origin.”  GotRoaches states:  “The Harlequin Roach (Neostylopyga Rhombifolia) originated in Indo-Malaysia, found is the northern part of Australia is now well established in various parts of the Western Hemisphere, including Mexico where it also migrated northward, near the Arizona border, few adults were also found in South California.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Rhysida longipes
Geographic location of the bug:  Miami, Florida
Date: 01/29/2018
Time: 01:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  When visiting relatives in Florida last year, I helped my uncle move old boards out of an unused sandbox. Underneath one board there was a pile of large, greenish centipedes that scattered as they were uncovered. As an invertebrate enthusiast, I am always on the lookout for new species of arthropod to observe, capture,  and/or breed, so I had a container handy and was able to capture a 3-4″ specimen that was slower than the rest. There weren’t any containers large enough to house it in safely so I had to use this yellow bucket until I found an appropriate one.
I had hoped to find other centipede species in Florida such as S. viridis or S. longipes, but this one was clearly neither of those. After a bit of research I learned that R. longipes is an adventive species originally native to Africa and Asia that has now colonized Florida and Mexico as well.  I thought I’d send this in so people could properly identify common giant centipedes, as many pictures of R. longipes from Florida are mistakenly identified as Scolopendra and Hemiscolopendra on other sites.
As for the specimen I caught, she is now comfortably living in captivity and has regrown some of the lost antennomeres since these photos were taken.
How you want your letter signed:  lawnshrimp

African Longtail Centipede with Cockroach prey

Dear lawnshrimp,
Thanks for sending your images of the introduced African Longtail Centipede, a name we located on FlickR where it states:  “Though this exotic species has been found on occasion in Florida, all but one incidence was of solitary animals and it has never been considered an established part of the Florida fauna. Late in 2014, while on a scientific collecting trip to south Florida, we came across a large population of this species, which included juveniles through adults, on one of the main Keys. The animals had never been recorded from this area. Later that same evening, we located a large adult just outside of the Everglades National Park, representing an additional locality for this taxon. We wrote up a brief communication for this new, established member of the south Florida ecosystem for the Florida Entomologist which is currently in review.”  We also found your images posted to Arachnoboards.  Whenever we learn of an introduced species into an ecosystem, we are concerned that native species might be displaced due to larger or more aggresive introductions.

African Longtail Centipede with Cockroach prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Elm Seed bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Osooyos, BC Canada
Date: 01/22/2018
Time: 05:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi There
Just hoping to get conformation on this beetle.
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Hannah Rowe

Elm Seed Bugs

Dear Hannah,
We agree that these are invasive Elm Seed Bugs,
Arocatus melanocephalus.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to, and widespread in S. & C. Europe, established and spreading in w. NA (BC-OR-ID-UT)” and “Invades homes during summer, may stay through the winter.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Inside a European Paper Wasp nest
Geographic location of the bug:  Tonasket, WA
Date: 01/22/2018
Time: 11:00 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I think I can only send one picture at a time.  There’s 3.
At the end of the hatching season, these1/2 dozen or so had a hole chewed in the top of their egg cell. None of the earlier eggs had this done to them. Don’t know if it was the baby or their mates that did it. About 2 weeks later the wasp emerged the same way as all the rest, by chewing the cap off from the inside and flipping it back like a Pez dispenser. They were next to my garden, and I had absolutely no bugs. Not good ones or bad ones. They are also very calm. I took tons of pictures and the only time they got excited was when the wind blew my hair into their nest. They didn’t chase me very far… lol. I know they eat the good as well as the bad, but that’s just nature. My moral dilemma here, is I know they are an invasive species. Any thoughts on whether or not they should be destroyed?
How you want your letter signed:  Cathy

European Paper Wasp Nest

European Paper Wasp Nest (10 days later)

This is on 8-15-17, and I’m sending it because it looks like it has moved in there. I’m really  close, 3 or 4 inches and on macro. Sorry it’s still blurred. None of the wasps cared I was there. It hatched a couple of days later.

European Paper Wasp Nest (11 days later)

Dear Cathy,
Thanks for sending in your images of the activity in a European Paper Wasp Nest.  According to BugGuide:  “First reported in North America in 1978 near Boston, MA” and “Replacing native wasps in some areas.”  According to Colorado State University Extension:  “The European paper wasp has already largely replaced the native species in much of the region. Some reasons for the competitive advantage to P. dominulus over our native paper wasps include:

  • Earlier establishment of colonies in the spring, which allows it a competitive advantage in collection of early season prey. Early nest establishment also avoids some bird predation, and allows the production of early season workers to hunt for prey and protect developing larvae.
  • The habit of using protected nesting sites provides protection from predation. The European paper wasp utilizes small holes and voids to make nests, which are sites the native species does not exploit to the same extent.
  • The native paper wasps prey on caterpillars, while the European paper wasp capture a variety of insects from several orders. The varied diet of our new invader gives it a distinct advantage over the native species.
  • European paper wasps reuse nests that have been abandoned for various reasons, while our native species do not reuse nests. European paper wasps have an advantage in being able to establish colonies more quickly than the native paper wasps.

We empathize with your dilemma.  At the end of the day, there are species that adapt to co-existing with humans and species that do not.  Species that adapt to living near humans often out compete native species.  We always lament the loss of native species after the introduction of invasive species. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  oahu,Hi
Date: 01/19/2018
Time: 01:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just would like to know what it is.
How you want your letter signed: Sam

Big Legged Bug

Dear Sam,
This is a Big Legged Bug or Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae.  Many insects in Hawaii are not native, and it is very likely that this is an introduced species.  Except for being darker, it really resembles the Sweet Potato Bug,
Physomerus grossipes, pictured on Graham’s Island where it states it:  “is a fairly recent introduction to Hawaii, most likely sneaking in on an imported plant. It’s from the family Coreidae, otherwise known as leaf footed bugs. It feeds by sucking juices out of various plants, including sweet potatoes. I found this one wandering across a window screen, some distance from anything edible.”  The images on Encyclopedia of Life also look very similar, but the images on the highly entertaining posting No Thighmaster Needed by This Bug on Hawaii Horticulture appear to be a different species in the family.

Big Legged Bug

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination