Currently viewing the tag: "Invasive Exotics"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gerald
Geographic location of the bug:  Duxbury, Massachusetts
Date: 01/10/2019
Time: 12:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Mr. Bugman,
My friends and I have enjoyed our chemistry class while watching our friend Gerald, a dead bug, who passed away a week ago. I am truly hurt that he was killed, but he brings us good luck to every class. He was very near and dear to my heart, and I would love to know what bug he is. R.I.P. Gerald <3
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks!

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

We are sorry for the loss of your good luck mascot, but alas, Gerald is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, an invasive, exotic species that was first reported from Pennsylvania at the end of the 20th Century and has now spread across much of the North American continent.  Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs frequently enter homes to hibernate.  Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs pose a significant threat to agriculture, and according to BugGuide:  “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures” and “in the US, reported to damage apples, pears, peaches, cherries, corn, tomatoes, peppers, soybean, ornamentals…”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Found four of these in my house
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern westchester.  South salem new york
Date: 12/22/2018
Time: 03:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found one dead on A sweater in my drawer, another on the steps and two more. They are hard shelled. Please see if you can identify.
How you want your letter signed:  Roberts

Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

Dear Roberts,
While your image is quite blurry, we are confident this is a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, an Invasive Exotic species from Asia that is now established across North America.  Invasive Exotic species often proliferate as they have no natural enemies.  They are also Household Pests since they seek shelter indoors to escape our cold winters.  Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs pose a significant threat to agriculture since, according to BugGuide, they are “Highly polyphagous, reported on ~300 plant spp. in its native range; feeds mostly on fruit, but also on leaves, stems, petioles, flowers, and seeds. Damage typically confined to fruiting structures.”  Indoors they are a nuisance, but they will not damage your home nor its furnishings.

Thank you so much!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black striped beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  North San Diego County, CA
Date: 11/05/2018
Time: 03:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy was sitting on a stucco wall, then moved to the pavement. Any idea what he/she is?  He/she was about an inch long.
How you want your letter signed:  Sarah L

Diaprepes Root Weevil

Dear Sarah,
Thanks for resending your images.  We are currently undergoing some technical difficulties.  This is a Diaprepes Root Weevil and according to BugGuide:  “Native to the Caribbean, adventive and established in so. US: so. & central FL (1964), so. TX (Cameron & Hidalgo Cos 2000, Corpus Christi 2005, Houston 2009;), so. CA (2005), LA (2008); further north in greenhouses.”  BugGuide also notes:  “highly polyphagous; larvae feed on roots, adults on foliage of citrus trees (esp. oranges in TX) and almost 300 other plant species” and “Major pest of citrus crops.”

Thanks so much, Daniel! I’d never seen anything looking like that before here in Southern California. (And I’m a native!) I guess I’ll kill any others I find since I do have citrus trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Gry and red bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Southeastern Pennsylvania
Date: 09/30/2018
Time: 08:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Very interested in what type of bug/beetle this is. My son is an environmental scientist and has never seen this one before.
How you want your letter signed:  Baffled Abba

Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Baffled Abba,
This is an invasive Spotted Lanternfly,
Lycorma delicatula, a recently introduced Asian species that according to BugGuide: “Native to China, India, Japan and Vietnam; invasive in Korea and in our area. Currently (2018) known from 6 counties in PA; also found in DE, NY, VA.”  According to Delaware News:  “The spotted lanternfly – a destructive, invasive plant hopper – has been confirmed in New Castle County. Delaware is the second state to have found the insect which was first detected in the United States in 2014, in Berks County, PA. The spotted lanternfly has now spread to 13 Pennsylvania counties.  This insect is a potential threat to several important agricultural crops including grapes, apples, peaches, and lumber.”  According to RecordOnLine:  “The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets confirmed that the spotted lanternfly, an invasive insect, was found for the first time in New York State on Nov. 29, 2017.” According to the Northern Virginia Daily:  “A professor specializing in the study of insects confirmed a few days ago the reported sighting of a spotted lanternfly at a business in Winchester.  The professor, Douglas Pfeiffer of Virginia Tech, had visited other parts of Virginia in search of the lanternfly, but this was the first time he has been able to verify its presence.  The spotted lanternfly, which feeds on the sap of vines and trees, first came to the United States from China in 2014. Since then, the insects have been found mostly in Pennsylvania. But Pfeiffer said that it has been expanding where it lives since arriving.”  According to BugGuide:  According to BugGuide:  “SIGHTING REPORTS WANTED: Experts are working to delimit the current population and find new infestations of this species. Please report sightings on the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture website.  earliest NA record: PA 2014.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help with Bug ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Vila Velha, Brazil
Your letter to the bugman:  I am six years old and living in Brazil for a year.  I rescued this interesting bug from a swimming pool and want to know what it is.  My dad is helping me type this message.  Thank you for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  From Nadia F.

Darkling Beetle

Dear Nadia,
This is a Darkling Beetle in the family Tenebrionidae.  Because of your kind act of rescuing this Darkling Beetle from a swimming pool, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug (moth?) identification
Geographic location of the bug:  SE Pennsylvania
Date: 08/27/2018
Time: 11:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have never seen this bug before in our yard and I would appreciate if you can identify it.
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Andrei N.

Spotted Lanternfly

Dear Andrei,
This is an invasive Spotted Lanternfly,
Lycorma delicatula, a species introduced to Pennsylvania from Asia several years ago.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to China, India, Japan and Vietnam; invasive in Korea and in our area. Currently (2018) known from 6 counties in PA; also found in DE, NY, VA” and “SIGHTING REPORTS WANTED: Experts are working to delimit the current population and find new infestations of this species. Please report sightings on the Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture website.  earliest NA record: PA 2014.”  This is a winged adult.  Nymphs are wingless and may have bright red coloration.  You should report your sighting to help prevent the Spotted Lanternfly from spreading further in North America.  

Spotted Lanternfly

Hello Daniel,
Thank you. I will alert the PA Dept. of Agriculture.
Andrei

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination