Currently viewing the tag: "Household Pests"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  clear and brown bug
Geographic location of the bug:  bed, hair
Date: 02/23/2018
Time: 10:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  it bit me a lot and they keep coming out of my hair
How you want your letter signed:  jenna thibault

Human Louse

Dear Jenna,
This is a Human Louse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Ohio
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this bug crawling on my leg.Im hoping this is not a bed bug.If u could please tell me I would greatly appreciate it.I have kids so I would like to know before they start to multiply.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Human Louse

This is a very detailed image of a Human Louse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug identification in buckwheat
Geographic location of the bug:  Seattle WA
Date: 02/12/2018
Time: 04:13 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I develop natural filled bed pillows and we recently came across a bugs in our pillows that are filled with buckwheat hulls. We are trying to get them identified to better know how to treat our problem. We normally order the buckwheat from a local supplier that imports it from Europe.  Any insight would help.
How you want your letter signed:  Best, Beatrice

Booklouse

Dear Beatrice,
You have Booklice.  The good news is that according to Bugwood Wiki:  “Within a home booklice are almost always found in damp areas that support the molds on which they feed. Bathrooms are common areas where they are encountered. Occasionally they may build in large numbers on grain products that have been stored poorly. The common name relates to their occasional association with books, papers and fabrics where they feed on the starchy materials (e.g., glues, fillers). Booklice are considered to be very minor household pests and the arid climate of Colorado suppresses the occurrence of many species. Booklice cannot bite humans.”  The bad news is that despite being somewhat benign, the presence of large numbers of Booklice in your pillows will probably be off-putting to some customers.  Furthermore, your damp Seattle climate is probably contributing to the Booklice reproducing and increasing their numbers.

Booklice

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Heraklion, Crete, Greece
Date: 02/12/2018
Time: 07:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I’ve been seeing those bugs around my bedroom for a few months, but haven’t yet managed to identify them through internet swatches searches.
The best I could do regarding taking a photo is the one attached (+ zoomed in / enhanced version), which I took from distance with my phone.
I would really appreciate your help. Thank you very much, in advance.
Best,
Vangelis
How you want your letter signed:  Anonymous

Immature Cockroach

Dear Vangelis,
This is an immature Cockroach.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  whats that bug
Geographic location of the bug:  greece athens area
Date: 01/28/2018
Time: 03:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi we found some of these bugs in our bathroom
Do you know what is it and if it is dangerous or needs treatment
Regards
How you want your letter signed:  VP

Barklouse

Dear VP,
This looks to us like a benign Barklouse in the order Psocodea.  In our opinion, treatment is not necessary, though when plentiful, Barklouse might be a nuisance.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What Bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Westchester, New York,  USA
Date: 01/28/2018
Time: 05:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi There,
I was hoping you could help identify this. My sister works in a historic house. These bugs were found living in the rolled up carpets in the house.  They did not seem to be eating the carpet. They were found last week and they are a little bigger than a deer tick.
How you want your letter signed:  AL

Shiny Spider Beetle

Dear Al,
This is a Spider Beetle in the genus
Mezium, probably the Shiny Spider Beetle which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, Spider Beetles feed on “dry stored products.”  Though they generally infest stored foods, they might also feed on organic fibers in carpets.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination