Currently viewing the tag: "Household Pests"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Can’t quite figure this one out…
Hello Mr. Bugman!
I love your site and you’ve done a great job cataloging and explaining to people what bugs they have been lucky enough to photograph or see. I searched and couldn’t find out about my bug. I suspect that it’s a bagworm but i’m not sure. I live in St. Petersburg, Florida in an older wood framed house. We have lived her for 2.5 years and i’ve never seen this insect until the past few weeks. I’ve seen probably a 8 or so. They are usually >crawling up a wall – inching their way up pulling this sandy very flat sack like thing behind them. In the photos I’ve attached, I placed in on my bathroom sink to get a better shot. He has some lint attached to >him from the baseboard. I didn’t measure this one but another one I just found is about 1/8″ and he was smaller than this one. I would appreciate any feedback if possible.
Thanks so much!
Mo Eppley

Hi Mo Eppley,
You have Case-Bearing Moth larvae. We have additional information on our clothesmoth page. The small larvae carry a noticeable case made of fine sand and debris. The case, which is about a quarter to half an inch long, is flattened on top and bottom, expanded at its center and tapered at both ends. They are often found on walls (both outside and inside) of houses and other structures. Larvae are said to feed primarily on insect remains, fur, flannel, and hair: they do not seem to be a clothes pest. We have gotten several letters from Florida regarding Case Bearing Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Featherlike bug
Recently, i noticed some tiny bugs on a clean towel that i picked up from our bedroom wardrobe. After that, i examined all the clothes in our bedroom closet and discovered quite a lot of these bugs, most of them on clothes made from wool or cotton. It was almost impossible to get rid of them because they were hardly seen, so we took all of our clothes to the laundry. Their size is from 2 mm up to 7 mm that is 1/12" up to 1/4" inches (so i guess that the guy on the photo must be their… king). Later on that day, i discovered their… kingdom. A knitted carpet of wool, carefully stored in the wardrobe closet but not inspected for a long time, was covered all over of these bugs, so much that you couldn’t make out the drawing on it. Can you please tell me, what’s that bug and what caused the presence of it? Finally, is there a way to prevent this situation to the future?
Thanks for your help.
Babis, Greece

Dear Babis,
There is a reason your insect was discovered in the carpet. It is the larval form of a Carpet Beetle, Family Dermestidae. By now you must realize that they will destroy a fine wool rug that is being stored. They will also infest wool clothing, get into suede and leather, ande they are responsible for horrific damage to museum collections.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beetle Infestation
Hello, I live in Saskatchewan, Canada and have found 40-50 beetles in my house in the past two weeks. They are everywhere … upstairs, downstairs, bathrooms, kitchen, bedrooms, etc, etc. They are approximately 1/4 inch (5-6 mm) in length and solid black. We’ve never seen them fly and believe that they don’t have wings. I’ve included pictures. I found one larva. It was redish-brown and appeared striped (very similar to that of a larder beetle). Can you help us identify them, tell us why they’re moving in, and how to get rid of them. Thank you so much for any help you can offer.
Renee.

Hi Renee,
You have one of the Grain Weevils. This is just one type of Pantry Beetle. Grain Weevils infest stored grain products. Weevils belong to the Family Curculionidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Egg-sack thing with worm
I live in Sherman Oaks, a suburb of Los Angeles. I’ve been noticing at least one of these egg-sack things appear in and around my house lately, usually attached to a wall a few feet up from the floor. They are medium brown in color, look and feel like small scrap of paper, and are about one centimeter long. Do you know what is hatching out of it? The little worm keeps poking in and out of a hole at both ends of its “home.”
Thank you, – Shel

Hi Shel,
You have Case-Bearing Moth larvae Phereoeca fallax. Here is some information issued by the County of Los Angeles Agricultural Commissioner/Weights and Measures Department: Entomology Laboratory Services: "Case-bearing Moth Larva (Phereoeca fallax) this is a common species in the Los Angeles basin, specially along coastal areas. The small larvae carry a noticeable case made of fine sand and debris. The case, which is about a quarter to half an inch long, is flattened on top and bottom, expanded at its center and tapered at both ends. They are often found on walls (both outside and inside) of houses and other structures. Larvae are said to feed primarily on insect remains, fur, flannel, and hair: they do not seem to be a clothes pest. Thorough vacuuming should help control their numbers. The adult moths are very small and are rarely seen."

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Pointed head bug
Dear bugman,
Perhaps you can identify this bug picture I sketched. I cannot find a close match anywhere to say that I am sure what it is. It is a 6 legged bug VERY tiny, about 1/10". I can tell you that not only did they show up in my kitchen, but there were literally millions in a bag of birdseed! There were so many that you could hear the bag rustling. Gross! I looked in the bag to see millions of these creatures with their pointed heads and antennae. I hope you could steer me as to what these bugs are.
Thanks!
Tom Bartman
Pottstown, PA

Hi Tom,
Weevils are one type of Pantry Beetle whose shape matches your description and drawing. Weevils are a type of beetle belonging to the family Curculionidae. Grain Weevils belong to the genus Sitophilus and have the head elongated into a snout.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I use World’s Best Cat Litter. It’s an organic product made from corn. I have bought bags before that contained these small, elongated, lighter brown, hard, beetle type bugs. They don’t seem to be able to fly. I think they might develop into some sort of tiny moth, because I have seen the little (tiny!) moths in the litter enclosure, but nowhere else. I have tried freezing the bag before I use it in the litter box, but sometimes this does not work. What are these bugs and how do I get rid of them? Are they harmful to my cat? Could they get into the rest of the house? Sorry I don’t have a picture.
Christa Moeller

Dear Christina,
Both meal moths and pantry beetles will infest stored corn. Neither will harm your cats, but they may invade stored grain products in your pantry.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination