Currently viewing the tag: "Goldenrod Meadow"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mating pennyslvania leatherwings.
Hey bugman,
I thought I would share with you this image of a mating pair of pennsylvania leatherwings that I captured the other day near our house in Seymour, Tennessee, which is just south of Knoxville. I know you probably get a lot of these, but i thought that the angle on this photo was really cool. Anyway enjoy! I love the new layout of the site!
Michael Davis
Seymour, Tennessee

Pennsylvania Leatherwings Mating

Pennsylvania Leatherwings Mating

Hi Michael,
Thanks for the positive words about our new site format. Your mating Pennsylvania Leatherwings, AKA Goldenrod Soldier Beetles, is quite a nice addition to our archives

Update: 29 September 2008
It is time for us to select a Bug of the Month, and we almost chose the Locust Borer, but that was our Bug of the Month for October 2007. Pennsylvania Leatherwings, Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, are a good choice, because like the Locust Borer, they are associated with that common wildflower Goldenrod. When the Goldenrod blooms in the fall, there is an entire ecosystem that depends upon it for survival. We have fond memories of running through the fields in Ohio when the Goldenrod was in bloom, after school started but before the cold winter weather arrived. Preying Mantids were everywhere, as were a variety of Orb Weaving Spiders. The Monarch Butterflies were migrating, and the last Swallowtails and Fritillaries and Painted Ladies came to the blossoms for nectar. Wasps and Bees and the beetles that mimic them like the Locust Borer were everywhere on the flowers. Grasshoppers were hopping and flying about. The Pennsylvania Leatherwings were also quite common, but their smaller size kept them from being the dramatic stars in the drama of eat or be eaten that was happening around them..

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Wasp Moth?
Hello Bugman:
I live in the Williamsport, Pennsylvania area. Here are some photos of a bug I have taken in the past few days. He is seen feeding on the goldenrod amongst many other bees and wasps. It is a little over an inch long. I can’t tell if it is a bee, wasp, moth or some combination. Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks,
Alex

Hi Alex,
This beauty is a Feather Legged Fly, Trichopoda pennipes, one of the Tachinid Flies. According to BugGuide: “Adult female lays one to several eggs on a hemipteran host. The larvae hatch from the eggs and burrow directly into the bug’s body, though only one larva will survive within each host. The larva feeds on the host internally and eventually a large cream-colored maggot exits from body of the bug (which soon dies). The maggot pupates in a dark reddish-brown puparium in the soil and emerges as an adult about two weeks later. There are up to three generations a year depending on location, and larvae may overwinter in the bodies of overwintering hosts.” and “Often used as biological control of hemipteran pest species such as squash bugs, stink bugs, and plant bugs. May hover above squash plants in search of prey.” The black tipped abdomen is a signal that this is a female fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Locust Borer on goldenrod.
Hey bugman,
I think its really cool that the Locust borer is the new bug of the month for October. I have seen several this season and taken some pictures. This is the best one. Hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoy your website, which is a lot!
Mike D

Hi Mike,
Adult Locust Borers are active in the fall, and are commonly associated with goldenrod where they feed on nectar and pollen.
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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mystery Caterpillar and Bee-Like Insect
Hey Bugman,
I live in Rhode Island, and I’ve run across two odd insects recently. I was wondering if you could help me identify them.
The first was a bright-green and brownish-purple caterpillar with four little spikes on it. It was about an inch long. The second is a vaguely wasp-like insect (I’m not sure if this is Batesian or Mullerian mimicry, and I didn’t stick around to find out), and it was about an inch long as well. Thanks for your help,
Guillaume Riesen

Hi Guillaume,
Your caterpillar is a Saddleback Caterpillar and we have posted numerous images of this species. Your vaguely beelike insect is a Locust Borer, a Cerambycid Borer Beetle that is very common in the autumn and is often associated with goldenrod. Many beetles in this family are considered wasp mimics. We believe we are going to make it the Bug of the Month for October and will probably be using your photo on our homepage the entire month.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Red Banded Hairstreak?
Hey bugman,
thanks so much for posting my photo of the wheelbug. I have another one to share with you. I believe this is a red-banded hairstreak (correct me if im wrong). there were two of them nectaring on some goldenrod the other day and i took some pics. I think this was my favorite one. Enjoy and thanks again for a wonderful website.
Mike D.

Hi again Mike,
Your Red Banded Hairstreak photo is awesome. Thanks for adding to our archive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

A Locust Borer Beetle
Hi Daniel,
I couldn’t find this lovely beetle on your site, but s ome research led me to Megacyllene robiniae . It’s pretty similar t oMegacyllene caryae (which I did find on your site) ,but the yellow stripes seem more pronounced. Evidently this striking bug is pretty common this time of year, but this is the first time I’ve ever seen one. It was nearly an inch long and was hanging out on the goldenrod, along with a bunch of Pennsylvania leatherwings. It’s always so exciting to spot something new in the backyard, and I just wanted to share. Keep up the good work! Regards,
Christina
New Lenox, IL

Hi Christina,
We actually do have images on Locust Borers on some of our 15 pages devoted to beetles. This would have been an excellent choice for Bug of the Month for September, but we already picked the Bagworm since there were so many recent requests for identifications. Locust Borers are strikingly beautiful beetles that are commonly found on goldenrod where they feed on the pollen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination