Currently viewing the tag: "Goldenrod Meadow"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug on goldenrod
September 13, 2009
Photographed this guy/gal on a goldenrod plant along driveway–think it’s gorgeous and would like to know what I’m admiring. Also want to enter photo in competition and need ID to accompany it.
Sue C
Southern Maryland

Assassin Bug

Assassin Bug

Hi Sue,
There is an entire ecosystem that thrives when the goldenrod blooms, from the nectar and pollen seeking creature, to the predators that prey upon them.  This is an Assassin Bug in the genus Pselliopus, probably Pselliopus cinctus.  According to BugGuide it is often found where insects visit flowers.

Thanks so much for your reply.  I sort of thought it was an assassin bug based on what I could get from my insect guides.  Sue

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Borer?
September 12, 2009
Shortly after you identified my photos of the amorpha borer (or locust borer) I came across this one. It appears to be similar to the amorpha borer, but perhaps a different species. Can you identify it, please? Thanks!
Doug
near Omaha NE

Locust Borer

Locust Borer

Hi Doug,
This time your insect is a Locust Borer.  They appear in the autumn and they are often associated with goldenrod.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug Love
August 31, 2009
I thought you might like a photo of some margined leatherwing beetles in the mating act.
Doug
near Omaha NE

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Dear Doug,
Thanks for sending us your Bug Love image, but we don’t believe these are Margined Leatherwings.  That species, according to BugGuide, is “Very similar to C. pennsylvanicus, but pronotum has wide dark band, instead of an irregular dark spot. Elytra of C. marginatus often more extensively dark than pennsylvanicus. C. marginatus is also somewhat smaller and is active earlier in summer than C. pennsylvanicus.
In our opinion, your photo depicts mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles or Pennsylvania Leatherwings, Chauliognathus pensylvanicus.  Compare your image to the images posted on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Almost artful display
August 24, 2009
Me and my wife were on the way to the hospital to get some metal stitches pulled from me tummy from a hernia surgery, and seeing as we had the nikon tagging along with us in the backpack, decided to go by the fountain situated in front of BLDG 2 at the Bill Hefner VA Hospital in Salisbury, NC. We truly couldn’t have come at a better time as as soon as we arrived there was also a pair of grasshoppers prolonging the species as it were. I almost thought it necessary to recommend a hotel, LOL! I will be probably be adding another post here since I truly don’t know where this other insect I found falls into the category. Several Butterflies (Swallowtails and others) were showing off before us along with the random wood boring bee.
This insect is approximately 9/16″ to 5/8″ in length and was kinda slow in moving selectively extracting pollen, and almost playing dead when we got too close. It has some markings that almost look as if someone had attempted to paint small flowers on each side… Absolutely stunning when you can zoom in. Let me know what this litter bugger is, me and my wife are dying to know!!!
Amateur Photographer, Can you tell?
VA Hospital, Salisbury, NC Next to waterfall

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Dear Amateur Photographer,
This moth is known as an Ailanthus Webworm, but sadly, it only eats the leaves of the Ailanthus, or Tree of Heaven, and it doesn’t do much to remove this scourge from North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please ID this beetle found on Cape Cod
I found several beetles like this in a patch of flowers in a saltwater marsh on Cape Cod. There were lots of aggressive wasps around the flowers that chased off bees and other insects that approached (and me!), but these beetles were left alone. I have never seen this beetle before, and I’d like to know what it is. Also, is the black and yellow coloration a strategy to fool the wasps into accepting their presence?
East Sandwich, CApe Cod, MA
Tim Crowninshield

Locust Borer

Locust Borer

Hi Tim,
What a positively gorgeous photo of a Locust Borer.  These wasp mimic beetles are found in the late summer and early autumn, and they are frequently associated with goldenrod blossoms.  Their coloration helps them fool potential enemies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mating pennyslvania leatherwings.
Hey bugman,
I thought I would share with you this image of a mating pair of pennsylvania leatherwings that I captured the other day near our house in Seymour, Tennessee, which is just south of Knoxville. I know you probably get a lot of these, but i thought that the angle on this photo was really cool. Anyway enjoy! I love the new layout of the site!
Michael Davis
Seymour, Tennessee

Pennsylvania Leatherwings Mating

Pennsylvania Leatherwings Mating

Hi Michael,
Thanks for the positive words about our new site format. Your mating Pennsylvania Leatherwings, AKA Goldenrod Soldier Beetles, is quite a nice addition to our archives

Update: 29 September 2008
It is time for us to select a Bug of the Month, and we almost chose the Locust Borer, but that was our Bug of the Month for October 2007. Pennsylvania Leatherwings, Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, are a good choice, because like the Locust Borer, they are associated with that common wildflower Goldenrod. When the Goldenrod blooms in the fall, there is an entire ecosystem that depends upon it for survival. We have fond memories of running through the fields in Ohio when the Goldenrod was in bloom, after school started but before the cold winter weather arrived. Preying Mantids were everywhere, as were a variety of Orb Weaving Spiders. The Monarch Butterflies were migrating, and the last Swallowtails and Fritillaries and Painted Ladies came to the blossoms for nectar. Wasps and Bees and the beetles that mimic them like the Locust Borer were everywhere on the flowers. Grasshoppers were hopping and flying about. The Pennsylvania Leatherwings were also quite common, but their smaller size kept them from being the dramatic stars in the drama of eat or be eaten that was happening around them..

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination