Currently viewing the tag: "Goldenrod Meadow"
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Subject: paper wasp and goldenrod
Location: Troy, VA
September 23, 2016 12:28 pm
Hi Daniel,
I thought you might like this for your goldenroad meadow. I believe the wasp is some kind of paper wasp. The goldenrod by my house is mostly attracting wasps. I haven’t seen much else on it so far
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Paper Wasp

Paper Wasp

Dear Grace,
Thanks for contributing to our Goldenrod Meadow tag.  We agree that this is a Paper Wasp in the genus
Polistes, possibly Polistes annularis which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Arrow spider and goldenrod
Location: Troy, VA
September 18, 2016 12:22 pm
Hi Daniel,
I’m trying hard not to inudate you with photos, but I thought you might like this image of an arrow spider by some goldenrod. While the spider is not using the goldenrod as direct source of food, it is nicely camouflaged by the goldenrod and seems to be using it as a way to hunt insects that do feed on the goldenrod. The yellow of the spider and the yellow of the goldenrod are remarkably similar. Also, it’s such a cool little spider.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

Dear Grace,
One couldn’t help but to disagree more with your belief that this Arrowshaped Micrathena “is not using the goldenrod as a direct source of food” because though it is not eating the goldenrod, it is eating the insects that are attracted to the goldenrod.  While Arrowhead Micrathenas would survive without the goldenrod, we believe that they and other orbweavers as well as carnivorous insects including preying mantids thrive in a goldenrod meadow.  This is a marvelous addition to our Goldenrod Meadow tag and we agree heartily that the coloration of the Arrowshaped Micrathena is perfect with the goldenrod.  Here is a nice BugGuide image of an Arrowhead Micrathena.  We forgot that we had a 10 Most Beautiful Spiders tag, and we are adding your Arrowhead Micrathena to that tag.

Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

Arrowhead Micrathena

Arrowshaped Micrathena

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WAFFLE BUG
Location: Courtice, Ontario Canada
September 9, 2016 5:40 pm
I found this unusual bug on a leaf near the golden rod plants.
Really different than anything I’ve seen before. It was eating the leaf. there were light tan colored ones and all white ones. they look like waffles. Hope you have an idea what they are.
Signature: Terri Martin

Chrysanthemum Lace Bug

Chrysanthemum Lace Bug

Dear Terri,
Thanks to providing us with the host plant Goldenrod, we feel quite confident your Lace Bug is a Chrysanthemum Lace Bug,
Corythucha marmorata, because according to BugGuide:  “hosts: several species of Asteraceae; reported from Solidago, Aster, Ambrosia, Helianthus, Rudbeckia, Echinops.”  Solidago is the genus for Goldenrod.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery wasp
Location: Troy, VA
September 5, 2016 1:01 pm
I spotted this lovely wasp (I’m assuming it’s a wasp, but maybe it’s not) on goldenrod flowers by the side of a pond. It has a slight bluish sheen that doesn’t really show in the photos. I have done some searching but can’t really figure out what this is. Any help would be appreciated.
thanks again
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Potter Wasp

Potter Wasp

Dear Grace,
We identified your Potter Wasp as
Zethus spinipes thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Black, thorax has yellow marks. Narrow yellow band on abdominal segment 3. Wings brown to violet. Bizarre stalked abdomen typical of genus.”  We are very excited to have a posting to add to our new tag:  Goldenrod Meadow.

Potter Wasp

Potter Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle orgy on goldenrod!
Location: Schenectady, NY
August 27, 2016 11:46 am
Hello WhatsThatBug,
I thought you’d enjoy this shot of no less than four pairs of mating beetles on the same goldenrod plant! There were actually at least two other pairs that I didn’t get in the shot, so clearly this plant is the place for looooove. I think they are Goldenrod Soldier Beetles.
I spotted them at a local park that has a perfect pond for dragonflies. This stand of goldenrod grows alongside a tiny stream that runs through the grass in an open area, and as you can imagine it is a very popular spot for all kinds of insects, including a huge variety of bees and wasps. I’ll need to go back with extra batteries in my camera to see what else I can photograph!
Signature: Susan B.

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Dear Susan,
Your lurid images of mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles,
Chauliognathus pensylvanicus, are a wonderful addition to our Bug Love tag.  Many years ago we created a Milkweed Meadow tag because there is such a diverse group of insects, including the Monarch Butterfly, that depend upon milkweed for survival, and there are many other insects that are attracted to the nectar rich blossoms.  At that time, we had planned a companion plant community tag called the Goldenrod Meadow because similar to milkweed, goldenrod is also associated with a very diverse insect community.  We are taking the opportunity to launch our Goldenrod Meadow tag with your wonderful submission, and now we will have to go back through our archives to tag appropriate postings from the past.  When you return to the goldenrod patch with extra batteries, please send us any images that you feel will be of interest to our readership. 

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

Mating Goldenrod Soldier Beetles

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

”in-line branch” bug pod – don’t know how to describe
Location: Lancaster, Pennsylvania
November 20, 2011 3:09 pm
Any idea what sort of insect grows inside these ”pods” on these shrub branches? When I cut them open there is a 1/4 inch ”grub” in the center.
They make great toy spinning tops.
Thank you for your time and your help!
Signature: cfunck

Goldenrod Galls

Dear cfunck,
This is a sight our editorial staff is quite familiar with having grown up in eastern Ohio.  Interestingly, this is the first submission we have received of Goldenrod Galls despite having this online column for more than 12 years.  These Galls
are formed by the Goldenrod Gall Fly, Eurosta solidaginis.  You may read more about this insect on BugGuidewhere it is stated:  “Larvae form round galls on the stem of certain goldenrods, Solidago. They feed there, then pupate in early spring. Adults emerge April-May and mate near goldenrod.”  Galls are growths on plants that are often caused by insects including flies, wasps and moths, and sometimes by mites.  Galls are abnormal growths that generally do not harm the plant, and though they are usually produced by insects and other arthropods, they can also be cause by other sources.

Goldenrod Gall

Daniel,
Thank you so much for this information!
Kind regards,
Chris Funck

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination