Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider Wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Omaha, Nebraska
Date: 08/29/2018
Time: 03:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought this was one bug when I saw it out the corner of my eye. Nope! It was a wasp carrying a big spider.
How you want your letter signed: Alissa Apel
anapeladay.com

Spider Wasp with Prey

Dear Alissa,
Your images of a female Spider Wasp with her prey are awesome.  The Spider wasp is
 Entypus unifasciatus and the prey is likely a large Wolf Spider.

Spider Wasp with Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cincinnati,  ohio
Date: 08/28/2018
Time: 09:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! We found this guy munching on some caterpillars on our kale plant.  Any idea what kind of big this is?
How you want your letter signed:  Ginja ninja

Predatory Stink Bug Nymph eats Caterpillar

Dear Ginja ninja,
The predator is a Stink Bug nymph and we have identified it as an immature Spined Soldier Bug, a member of the genus
Podisus, thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “preys on a wide variety of other arthropods, especially larval forms of Lepidoptera and Coleoptera. known to eat Mexican bean beetles, European corn borers, diamondback moths, corn earworms, beet armyworms, fall armyworms, cabbage loopers, imported cabbageworms, Colorado potato beetles, and velvetbean caterpillars.”  We will attempt to identify your Moth Caterpillar as well, but we are surmising that since it was found on kale, it is most likely an undesirable species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar Found on a tomato plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Bridgeview, IL
Date: 08/25/2018
Time: 10:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Are those eggs on it’s back?  Do i need to worry?
How you want your letter signed:  Steve Guptill

Parasitized Tobacco Hornworm

Dear Steve,
Your caterpillar is a Tobacco Hornworm, and what you have mistaken for eggs are the pupae of a parasitic Braconid Wasp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider Wasp: Entypus unifasciatus
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Date: 08/22/2018
Time: 06:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Encountered this Spider wasp attempting to haul off his bounty today…wolf spider. A rather large wolf spider at that.
Respect for anything that takes care of these nasty spiders for me.
How you want your letter signed:  Stefanie

Spider Wasp with Wolf Spider Prey

Dear Stefanie,
Only female Spider Wasps hunt for prey to feed the brood.  We agree your wasp is
Entypus unifasciatus, and according to BugGuide:  “Females dig a burrow that ends in a terminal chamber off of the side of a mammal burrow or large crack in the ground. The serrations on the hind tibiae are used to aid the movement of soil out of the burrow entrance. The position in which the egg is laid is unknown. Larvae feed on one large spider and, as in all Pompilids that have one generation per year, overwinter as pupae.”

Correction:  January 23, 2018
In reference to the August 22, 2018 photo of Entypus unifasciatus from Oklahoma City, OK by “Stephanie,” the host spider is Syspira sp. (Prowling spider)(Miturgidae). Of 414 host records for this species of wasp, this is the first host record (1/414, 0.02%) for this family of spider. We do, however, have the same genus and family host record for the congener Entypus aratus from Mexico. We should like to acknowledge “What’s That Bug” and Stephanie for this extremely rare and highly unusual host record. Does Stephanie have a last name to accompany this record in our forthcoming publication on spider wasps? Thank you. Keep up the good work.

Retraction of Correction:  March 4, 2019
When I first saw the image I thought it was a lycosid (wolf spider).  I sent it to an arachnologist at the CAS and he identified the spider as Genus Syspira, Family Miturgidae.  Since then I have consulted two other arachnologists, one from SDSU in CA, and they both informed me that the genus Syspira does not occur in Oklahoma.  They checked hundreds of museum records for this genus through a third arachnologist at Colorado State University and the genus does not occur in SE CO nor in N Texas.  They think the spider is in the genus Hogna (Lycosidae) but cannot be certain because, unfortunately, they cannot see the eye arrangement from the side view photograph.  I’ve sent your higher resolution out for additional study but, since the genus Syspira does not occur in Oklahoma, this is probably a moot exercise.  Thank you for your effort in aiding this identification dilemma.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  East Berlin PA
Date: 08/20/2018
Time: 04:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you help identify the bug in the attached picture? It looked like it was eating the other bug, and its long body reminded me of a dragonfly.  I really have no idea what it is.  Your help is very much appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Cindy Treger

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats prey

Dear Cindy,
The predator in your image is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus Promachus, and we believe it is a Red Footed Cannibalfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black killer wasp
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Illinois
Date: 08/16/2018
Time: 04:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  These two were battling it out, but the wasp won in the end. I thought it may have been a cicada killer, but this one was all black, maybe a little Blueish.
How you want your letter signed:  Karin

Great Black Wasp and Katydid Prey

Dear Karin,
We are thrilled to be able to post your wonderful images of a female Great Black Wasp and her Katydid prey.  The wasp has stung and paralyzed the Katydid and she it trying to get it back to her underground burrow.  She is probably climbing the table to give her some height so she can take off and glide toward her nest.  According to BugGuide:  “Provision nests (in burrow in soft earth) with Katydids or grasshoppers. ”  Also commonly called Katydid Hunters, these solitary wasp are not aggressive toward humans.

Great Black Wasp and Katydid prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination