Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect attached to caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Macon, Ga
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 07:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was curious what this insect is?
How you want your letter signed:  Evan S. Thomas

Giant Strong Nosed Stink Bug nymph eats Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Evan,
Though most Stink Bugs feed on plants, those in the subfamily Asopinae, the Predatory Stink Bugs, prey on other insects and arthropods.  We quickly identified this Strong Nosed Stink Bug nymph,
Alcaeorrhynchus grandis, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  The prey is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orange bug I’ve never seen
Geographic location of the bug:  Lee county, Kentucky
Date: 06/17/2019
Time: 11:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never seen this bug before and couldn’t find it online anywhere.  Just curious, really.
How you want your letter signed:  C. Abner

Passionflower Flea Beetle stalked by Jumping Spider

Dear C. Abner,
We are amused at your image of a Passionflower Flea Beetle being stalked by a Jumping Spider.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae and adults freq. found on Passionflower (
Passiflora).”

Haha!!  Yeah, the spider wasn’t there when I went to take the picture.  He jumped out last second and did a ‘photobomb’!  And then went back to his hiding spot under the rail!
Thank you so much for the info!  You’re welcome to use my photos if you’d like.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Super Close ups of Robber Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Ellijay, GA
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 08:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My son excitedly for this guy and we Scored some great shots of this guy June 10, 2019.  He didn’t seem to mind that I was interrupting his dinner. Would love to know the species.
Enjoy!
How you want your letter signed:  Melissa

Beelike Robber Fly eats Japanese Beetle

Dear Melissa,
Your son’s images are wonderful and an excellent addition to our Food Chain tag.  This is a Beelike Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, and it is feeding on an invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle, the scourge of many gardeners.  Because of the yellow hairs on the abdomen and legs, and because of your location, we believe this is Laphria macquarti based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Seems to prefer small beetles, but would eat other insects, even other robber flies” which further supports our tentative identification.

Beelike Robber Fly eats Japanese Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider wasp and prey
Geographic location of the bug:  Charleston, Illinois
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 01:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw you were looking for a image of this spider and its prey. Just a cell phone picture but shows key features.
How you want your letter signed:  Christopher S

Spider Wasp and Wolf Spider Prey

Dear Christopher,
Thanks so much for submitting your awesome image of a Spider Wasp,
Entypus unifasciatus, and its Wolf Spider prey.  The Wolf Spider will not be eaten by the Spider Wasp.  She feeds on nectar from flowers, and the paralyzed Wolf Spider will provide fresh food for a larval Spider Wasp which will eat its paralyzed meal alive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  spider on black swallowtail
Geographic location of the bug:  Auburn, California
Date: 04/17/2019
Time: 01:08 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought this was a cool image of a spider incapacitating a black swallowtail. This was along a trail, near the flowers the butterfly was feeding on. Maybe a crab spider? Enjoy!
How you want your letter signed:  k. cassidy

Crab Spider eats Pipevine Swallowtail

Dear k. cassidy,
This is an awesome image.  We agree that this is a Crab Spider.  Crab Spiders do not build webs to snare prey.  Many species, especially pastel colored, pink, yellow or white Crab Spiders, are camouflaged in blossoms where they wait to ambush pollinating prey like bees and butterflies.  Your Swallowtail is actually a Pipevine Swallowtail.  Did you witness the Crab Spider capture the Pipevine Swallowtail?  If not, was the Swallowtail still alive when you encountered this awesome Food Chain illustration, though interestingly, this is not the first time we have received documentation of a Crab Spider eating a Pipevine Swallowtail.

yes, love the pipevine swallowtails this time of year (here they like the lilac and brodiaea best). I did not see it in the capturing phase, but this butterfly was still alive though incapacitated. Seemingly big prey, but the spider had him for sure! This is in the Auburn State Recreation Area along the American River in Northern California.
Thanks for the ink to the other crab spider catching a pipevine! I didn’t see that when I first searched.
Enjoy and share the image!
thanks,
kerrie
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Carpenter bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bluff Durban South Africa
Date: 02/20/2019
Time: 06:08 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a carpenter bug? 2nd time submitting first  gave me an error just incase you get twice
How you want your letter signed:  Charlene Boock

Carpenter Bee Robber Fly eats Wasp

Dear Charlene,
Your Food Chain image is magnificent.  Thanks for taking the time to ensure it was properly submitted.  It does appear to be a Carpenter Bee Robber Fly and the prey appears to be a Paper Wasp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination