Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Crab/flower spider
I was so excited today, when I went out to admire my roses, and found a cool white spider with pink lightning bolts down it’s side! I’d seen spiders of a similar shape, but not with this neat-o, new-wave color palate, and never in the middle of their lunch. I grabbed my camera snapped a couple pics, and immediately came back inside to google white and pink spider. Your site came up, and I started looking through it. That was 3 hours ago. What a great site you have!! Well – now I know what my spider is, as well as so many other critters I’ve seen about my house, here in Seattle, WA. I noticed you don’t have too many entries from this part of the country, though, and I’ve seen some interesting creatures that I couldn’t find on your site. Now that I know you’re here, I’ll keep my camera handier, so that when I do see new fascinating friends, I can get your help in naming them for me. Thanks for your wonderful site!!
Michelle

Hi Michelle,
I’m so happy our site was both helpful and entertaining.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

No questions, just thought you might enjoy this picture
Elizabeth Norman

Thanks for the image of the feeding Argiope Elizabeth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Cicada Killer
My wife and I enjoy your site. We live in Baton Rouge, LA and our garden has a diverse range of hymenopterans. This past summer we had a large emergence of cicadas and my wife took this photo of a cicada killer on our patio door. The size of these wasps is truly impressive. We also have velvet ants that hang out near one of our pecan trees (photo attached).
Regards – Mark & Malinda

Hi Mark and Malinda,
We are always happy to get good quality images of interesting subjects to add to our website. Yours is the only photo we have ever received of the Cicada Killer with its prey. Thank you so much.
Daniel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Any idea what this is, I live on Vancouver Island, Canada, and have seen a number of these insects attacking and killing wasps and bees. Any info would be appreciated.
Thanks
Stuart Clarke

Hi Stuart,
You have a totally awesome photograph of a Robber Fly, Family Asilidae. There is one genus, Laphria, known as Bee Hunters. Your fly belongs to that genus. Adults feed on Honey Bees, though your photo shows a Yellow Jacket being devoured. A species in California and Oregon is Sacken’s Bee Hunter, Laphria sackeni. Also, the larvae of robber flies are pretty much now assumed to be parasitic on beetle grubs. According to our Audubon Field Guide: “Sacken’s Bee Hunter flies rapidly and suddenly descends on an unsuspecting bee. It seizes its victim on the thorax so the bee cannot use its stinger.” You might want to submit your photo to the new field guide we advertise at the top of our homepage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

You bet it is.
(09/10/2004) Hello from Houston Tx
We caught this cool pic of what I believe to be a Green Lynx munching on a leaf footed bug (we have a bunch of leaf footed bugs on our young pecan tree) We live in a suburb of Houston (Katy Tx).
We moved into our home about a year ago and we have been trying to make our large backyard into a sort of wildlife haven for our 4 children to enjoy and learn . We planted Butterfly weed, morning Glory Passion flower, and all sorts of other flowers and foilage. The Butterfly , Hummingbird, and Tree frog response has been fantastic! The unexpected insect population has been even more fascinating! I never cared for "Bugs", but over the summer I have developed a big interest! Seeing creatures that I have never seen before.
A couple of weeks ago we found a Assassin bug on one of our vines. Iwas researching on the internet trying to Identify this creature to see if it was harmful to our vegetable garden, when I stumbled upon your site. Since then I have been a daily WHAT’S THAT BUG visitor, and my wife has used it for reference in the classroom! (She is an Environmental Science Teacher at the High School level) Needless to say , I credit your extremely Cool site for sparking this interest in me (at the ripe old age of 37), and my wife is thankful for anything that keeps me off the golf course!
Thanks
Tony Fossee

Hi Tony,
We get many letters that make us feel good about our humble site, but yours is one of the best. I am so happy to hear we are helpful and have had a positive influence. Yes, your spider is a Green Lynx, Puecetia viridans. It is our favorite spider. I once saw one leap about a foot to capture a butterfly, which it missed, but I was still impressed. If you are a recent visitor to our site, you should know that we usually go offline about mid month due to heavy traffic.
On a side note, we were just approached to do a limited edition What’s That Bug? calendar, and we would love to include your letter and photo. Most of our favorite letters are so old we cannot even contact the senders, but I wanted you to have a heads up. Thanks again for the warm letter and have a nice day
Daniel

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Orb in the Basement
Since Finding your site spiders have become more intriguing to me. This little guy seems to have a walking person on its belly. Any ideas as to what it might be?
Thanks
Shawn
Battle Creek, MI

Hi Shawn,
I’m very happy you find our site interesting. Sorry I can’t be more exact with your spider. It seems to be one of the Comb-Footed Spiders, Family Theridiidae. The Black Widow is in this family, but your critter isn’t one of the few dangerous spiders we have stateside. Your spider appears to be a very competant hunter, considering the ground beetle and millipede it has caught.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination