Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Nursery Web or Fishing Spider? (plus, they’re just cool pictures!)
I live in the lowcountry of South Carolina and found this spider on my back patio a couple of weeks ago. The toad is a baby one, maybe about 1″ – 1 1/4″ long. I took so many pictures, this guy (gal?) must have gotten sick of my camera’s paparazzo flashblub because he took off across the lawn, taking the toad with him. I haven’t seen him since. I understand that, assuming this is the type of spider I think it is, that the bite is not lethal or particularly dangerous, but what if they get into a house and bite a small pet? Or even a baby or toddler? Thanks so much!
Samantha

Hi Samantha,
Wow! What a wonderful photo. This is a Dolomedes Fishing Spider, and it appears to be feasting on a Tree Frog. All spiders have venom, and it is possible that a bite could affect a sensitive person in a negative way. It is a sure bet that it would cause discomfort like swelling and or itching.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

dining damselfly
In the second photo a damselfly dines on a lygus bug while a tiny scuttle fly (at the left) competes for the meal. By the way, I took these photos with the 6x lens of a linen tester mounted in front of a camera not designed for close-up photography.
Ronald

Hi Ronald,
Your Damselfly foodchain image is great. Sorry we cannot identify the species (possibly a Violet Dancer, Argia vivida). We have real problems identifying dragonflies and damselflies. Perhaps someone will write in and identify it.

Update: Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 2:48 AM
Good morning,
The shape of the black marking and overall looj makes it a species of the Enallagma (Bluets)genus.
Renaud, Switzerland

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi– just found your gorgeous site. You can bet I’ll be a frequent visitor! We found this fine, fat, fellow at the far eastern point of the country this weekend, in Pembroke, Maine. I was just admiring this photo, when I noticed the little white blobs on the caterpillar’s skin. Are these wasp larvae? Will he die before he can turn into a moth? Also — I guess he’s a cecropia moth.
Meg in Maine

Hi Meg,
This is a Cecropia Moth, and it does appear as though it is parasitized, probably by a Brachonid Wasp species. If that is the case, sadly, the caterpillar will die before reaching adulthood. The wasp pupa are smaller than we are used to seeing on Sphingidae Caterpillars, so it might be another species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi– just found your gorgeous site. You can bet I’ll be a frequent visitor! We found this fine, fat, fellow at the far eastern point of the country this weekend, in Pembroke, Maine. I was just admiring this photo, when I noticed the little white blobs on the caterpillar’s skin. Are these wasp larvae? Will he die before he can turn into a moth? Also — I guess he’s a cecropia moth.
Meg in Maine

Hi Meg,
This is a Cecropia Moth, and it does appear as though it is parasitized, probably by a Brachonid Wasp species. If that is the case, sadly, the caterpillar will die before reaching adulthood. The wasp pupa are smaller than we are used to seeing on Sphingidae Caterpillars, so it might be another species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Spearhead Gumleaf Katydid
Hi!
Living in The Great Smoky Mountains, I never know what will happen next. I had just put out some birdseed when the Katydid flew in over my right shoulder and started dining. Its head bobbed up and down as it chowed down! The very next morning, as the sun was just about to make an appearance, I saw something stuck in the hummingbird feeder. Yes, a Katydid, and it was so “into” the sugar water that I was able to get as close as I pleased without even being noticed. The following day, on my way down the front steps, I found the orb weaving spider dining on a Katydid! Was it the same reckless one, or three different ones? Rhetorical question… Thanx again for listening,
R.G. Marion

Hi again R.G.
This looks like an Angular Winged Katydid to us.  The spider is an Orbweaver.

Update: (07/03/2008) Katydid IDs from Piotr Naskrecki
Hi,
I have been looking at the page with unidentified katydids (Katydids 2), and thought I could help with some ID’s. From top to bottom they are: Microcentrum sp.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello Bug People!
My daughter and I were quite surprised when this large insect buzzing around our deck returned with a yellow jacket for lunch. I was able to capture the Kodak moment, and with your website, identified the insect as a Robber Fly. What a brave guy — out catching bees (how DO they do that?!) and not a bit fazed by a camera in its face… Blessings,
Cindy

Hi Cindy,
Judging by the prominent beard and the large size, this must be a Giant Robber Fly in the genus Protacanthus. Thanks for getting up close and personal.

Update:  August 14, 2011
In doing some site maintenance, we realized we never properly identified this Red Footed Cannibalfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination