Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Praying mantis eats giant asain hornet
Location: In Asia.
February 11, 2017 4:06 pm
Last July me and my bros were playing video games and when we came outside to chill out a hornet flew in our home!. Then when we were
Trying to swat the wasp with our ps4 controller he flew in to this manties territory and he captured it with ease. So I took some photos.
Then at the end it was decapation.
Signature: Imb

Mantis eats Asian Hornet

Dear Imb,
We love your images of an Asian Mantis feeding on an Asian Hornet, however we do have a few questions we hope you are able to answer.  Asia is a huge continent.  Are you able to provide a city or country?  You indicated that the hornet flew into your home and that it flew into the mantid’s territory.  Was the mantis a pet?  Thanks for your contribution and your clarification of our questions.

Mantis Eats Asian Hornet

Mantis East Asian Hornet

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identify bug
Location: cuernavaca, morelos, mexico
February 2, 2017 10:42 pm
Hello bugman,
I am a biology teacher in Mexico and my kids found this bug. I am pretty sure it will turn into a butterfly or a moth, ad would like to identify it to make a case kid my students. Please help!
Thank you
Signature: Teacher Nadine

Parasitized Caterpillar

Dear Teacher Nadine,
We are not certain if this is a Brushfooted Butterfly Caterpillar in the family Nymphalidae or an early instar Giant Silkmoth Caterpillar in the family Saturniidae, but we can tell you for certain it will not turn into either a butterfly or a moth as it has been attacked by a Parasitic Wasp that laid eggs upon it.  The eggs hatched and the larval wasps feed on the internal organs, then emerged and pupated on the Caterpillar’s body.  The wasp pupae are the white rice-like objects visible in your images.  This caterpillar will die before reaching maturity.  We will attempt to get a more definitive caterpillar identification from Keith Wolfe.

Parasitized Caterpillar

Keith Wolfe Responds
Dear Teacher Nadine and Professor Bugman,
Yes, this is an unfortunate immature saturniid, POSSIBLY in the genus Hylesia (sorry, moth caterpillars are not my forte).
Best wishes,
Keith

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: millipede assassin bug
Location: Dordrecht, Eastern Cape, South Africa
January 7, 2017 11:16 pm
Bugman
Here are my images, but I am unable to load three at a time so I am going to try and send them one by one.
Enjoy!
Signature: Lollie Venter

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
When you submitted a comment to a posting in our archives of Millipede Assassin Bugs preying on a Millipede, we did not imagine that your images were going to be as spectacular as they turned out to be.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.  According to Beetles in the Bush, the Millipede Assassin Bugs
:  “Ectrichodia crux belongs to the subfamily Ectrichodiinae, noted for their aposematic coloration – often red or yellow and black or metallic blue, and as specialist predators of Diplopoda (Heteropteran Systematics Lab @ UCR).  Species in this subfamily are most commonly found in leaf litter, hiding during the day under stones or amongst debris and leaving their shelters at night in search of millipedes (Scholtz and Holm 1985). They are ambush predators that slowly approach their prey before quickly grabbing the millipede and piercing the body with their proboscis, or “beak.”  Saliva containing paralytic toxins and cytolytic enzymes is injected into the body of the millipede to subdue the prey and initiate digestion of the body contents, which are then imbibed by the gregariously feeding assassin bugs.”

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
Thanks for sending us additional images.  We now have six of your images posted to our site.

Daniel,
The video is still in production.  Will send it as soon as it has been done.
Regards
Lollie

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bug with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian wasp
Location: Hornsby NSW
December 3, 2016 1:03 am
My wife captured this shot in our front garden. I wonder if the wasp removed the huntsman spiders legs for transport purposes?
Signature: Australian wasp

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

We get several very dramatic submissions from Australia each year of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae with Huntsman Spider prey.  The female Spider Wasps stings and paralyzes the Huntsman Spider and then drags it back to her burrow where she lays an egg on the paralyzed Spider.  When the egg hatches, the wasp larva feeds on the living but paralyzed Spider.  It appears that your Spider Wasp has removed the legs of the Huntsman Spider by biting them off in order to make transportation easier.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe your Spider Wasp is in the genus Fabriogenia.

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: California valley
November 11, 2016 11:58 am
Working in California Valley and have seen a few of these insects slowly crawling around. There are flies everywhere, tons of them, but just today caught a slow mover munching on one of the flies, hence becoming a welcome addition to my home. They’ve been doing well too as they’ve left a pile of leftover carcasses at the base of their attack.
Just wondering what it is.
Thanks,
Signature: Chris

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Leafhopper Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Dear Chris,
The predator is an Assassin Bug in the genus
Zelus, and the prey appears to be a Flesh Fly.  We believe the Assassin is a Leafhopper Assassin Bug, Zelus renardii, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Generalist predator (despite its common name suggesting host specificity).”  Zelus Assassin Bugs seem to bite humans more readily than most other Assassin Bugs, with the exception of blood-sucking Kissing Bugs, and though their bite is not considered dangerous to humans, it may leave the bite site tender and swollen.  They should be handled with caution to avoid bites.

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Thank you..  They do keep the flies at bay

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ascalapha (Probrably)
Location: South of Brazil
November 7, 2016 7:38 am
Every year, these caterpillars came and use to stay in different species of trees. The most commum tree is the Prunus selowii. They use to stay in a big group , normally .8 m to 1,0 abovo the ground. They are very predate by hemiptera insesct, as you can see in the picture.
Totally inofensive, I means, they don´t provoque any irritation in the skin when manipulate.
Signature: Wilsonpni

Possibly Morpho Caterpillars

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars

Dear Wilsonpni,
Though your caterpillars resemble the caterpillar of a Black Witch,
Ascalapha odorata, based on this BugGuide image, we do not believe that is a correct identification.  We are pretty certain Black Witch Caterpillars do not feed in such aggregations.  Though the color is different, your caterpillars remind us of Morpho Caterpillars from our archives.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to get his opinion.  The image of the Predatory Stink Bug nymph feeding on a Caterpillar is a nice addition to our Food Chain tag.

Olá Daniel,
Nope, sorry, these are moth caterpillars, those of Morpho appearing distinctly different.
Abraços,
Keith

Aggregation of possibly Morpho Caterpillars

Aggregation of probably Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars

Update:  November 8, 2016
Thanks to a comment from contributor Cesar Crash of Insetologia, we now believe these are Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars from the genus
Arsenura.

Predatory Stink Bug preys on Caterpillar

Predatory Stink Bug preys on Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination