Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Carting off a big prize
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Ohio
Date: 06/20/2019
Time: 01:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was gardening when I noticed a little spider being dragged through the grass.   I thought at first that an ant was bringing it home, but maybe not.  It was making all sorts of enthusiastic abdominal movements I assumed were pheromone deposits.   Definitely had wings and a more fly-like face.   Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Kitsa

Spider Wasp and Crab Spider

Dear Kitsa,
The predator in your images is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and the prey is a Crab Spider, probably a Flower Spider,
Misumena vatia.  The Spider Wasp will not be eating the Crab Spider.  Rather, the Spider Wasp will place the paralyzed Crab Spider in an underground burrow so that the larval Spider Wasp will have a fresh source of food.  The pattern on the wings of the Spider Wasp are rather distinctive, and it appears that it might be Dipogon calipterus which is pictured on BugGuide.

Spider Wasp and Crab Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider eating an ant?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fort Collins, CO
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 09:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this lovely spider on my Siberian iris this evening. I can’t tell but it looks like she’s eating an ant, maybe? I’d love to know the species of spider as I haven’t seen one like this. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Sheryl Highsmith

Western Lynx Spider eats Ant

Dear Sheryl,
The spiny legs and shape of the body reminded us of a Green Lynx Spider, and we quickly identified this Western Lynx Spider,
Oxyopes scalaris, thanks to images on BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect attached to caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Macon, Ga
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 07:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was curious what this insect is?
How you want your letter signed:  Evan S. Thomas

Giant Strong Nosed Stink Bug nymph eats Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Evan,
Though most Stink Bugs feed on plants, those in the subfamily Asopinae, the Predatory Stink Bugs, prey on other insects and arthropods.  We quickly identified this Strong Nosed Stink Bug nymph,
Alcaeorrhynchus grandis, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  The prey is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orange bug I’ve never seen
Geographic location of the bug:  Lee county, Kentucky
Date: 06/17/2019
Time: 11:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never seen this bug before and couldn’t find it online anywhere.  Just curious, really.
How you want your letter signed:  C. Abner

Passionflower Flea Beetle stalked by Jumping Spider

Dear C. Abner,
We are amused at your image of a Passionflower Flea Beetle being stalked by a Jumping Spider.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae and adults freq. found on Passionflower (
Passiflora).”

Haha!!  Yeah, the spider wasn’t there when I went to take the picture.  He jumped out last second and did a ‘photobomb’!  And then went back to his hiding spot under the rail!
Thank you so much for the info!  You’re welcome to use my photos if you’d like.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Super Close ups of Robber Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Ellijay, GA
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 08:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My son excitedly for this guy and we Scored some great shots of this guy June 10, 2019.  He didn’t seem to mind that I was interrupting his dinner. Would love to know the species.
Enjoy!
How you want your letter signed:  Melissa

Beelike Robber Fly eats Japanese Beetle

Dear Melissa,
Your son’s images are wonderful and an excellent addition to our Food Chain tag.  This is a Beelike Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, and it is feeding on an invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle, the scourge of many gardeners.  Because of the yellow hairs on the abdomen and legs, and because of your location, we believe this is Laphria macquarti based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Seems to prefer small beetles, but would eat other insects, even other robber flies” which further supports our tentative identification.

Beelike Robber Fly eats Japanese Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider wasp and prey
Geographic location of the bug:  Charleston, Illinois
Date: 05/15/2019
Time: 01:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw you were looking for a image of this spider and its prey. Just a cell phone picture but shows key features.
How you want your letter signed:  Christopher S

Spider Wasp and Wolf Spider Prey

Dear Christopher,
Thanks so much for submitting your awesome image of a Spider Wasp,
Entypus unifasciatus, and its Wolf Spider prey.  The Wolf Spider will not be eaten by the Spider Wasp.  She feeds on nectar from flowers, and the paralyzed Wolf Spider will provide fresh food for a larval Spider Wasp which will eat its paralyzed meal alive.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination