Currently viewing the tag: "food chain"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: millipede assassin bug
Location: Dordrecht, Eastern Cape, South Africa
January 7, 2017 11:16 pm
Bugman
Here are my images, but I am unable to load three at a time so I am going to try and send them one by one.
Enjoy!
Signature: Lollie Venter

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
When you submitted a comment to a posting in our archives of Millipede Assassin Bugs preying on a Millipede, we did not imagine that your images were going to be as spectacular as they turned out to be.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.  According to Beetles in the Bush, the Millipede Assassin Bugs
:  “Ectrichodia crux belongs to the subfamily Ectrichodiinae, noted for their aposematic coloration – often red or yellow and black or metallic blue, and as specialist predators of Diplopoda (Heteropteran Systematics Lab @ UCR).  Species in this subfamily are most commonly found in leaf litter, hiding during the day under stones or amongst debris and leaving their shelters at night in search of millipedes (Scholtz and Holm 1985). They are ambush predators that slowly approach their prey before quickly grabbing the millipede and piercing the body with their proboscis, or “beak.”  Saliva containing paralytic toxins and cytolytic enzymes is injected into the body of the millipede to subdue the prey and initiate digestion of the body contents, which are then imbibed by the gregariously feeding assassin bugs.”

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Dear Lollie,
Thanks for sending us additional images.  We now have six of your images posted to our site.

Daniel,
The video is still in production.  Will send it as soon as it has been done.
Regards
Lollie

Millipede Assassin Bugs prey on Millipede

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bug with Prey

Millipede Assassin Bugs with Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian wasp
Location: Hornsby NSW
December 3, 2016 1:03 am
My wife captured this shot in our front garden. I wonder if the wasp removed the huntsman spiders legs for transport purposes?
Signature: Australian wasp

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

We get several very dramatic submissions from Australia each year of Spider Wasps in the family Pompilidae with Huntsman Spider prey.  The female Spider Wasps stings and paralyzes the Huntsman Spider and then drags it back to her burrow where she lays an egg on the paralyzed Spider.  When the egg hatches, the wasp larva feeds on the living but paralyzed Spider.  It appears that your Spider Wasp has removed the legs of the Huntsman Spider by biting them off in order to make transportation easier.  Based on images posted to the Brisbane Insect site, we believe your Spider Wasp is in the genus Fabriogenia.

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

Spider Wasp and Huntsman Prey

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: California valley
November 11, 2016 11:58 am
Working in California Valley and have seen a few of these insects slowly crawling around. There are flies everywhere, tons of them, but just today caught a slow mover munching on one of the flies, hence becoming a welcome addition to my home. They’ve been doing well too as they’ve left a pile of leftover carcasses at the base of their attack.
Just wondering what it is.
Thanks,
Signature: Chris

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Leafhopper Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Dear Chris,
The predator is an Assassin Bug in the genus
Zelus, and the prey appears to be a Flesh Fly.  We believe the Assassin is a Leafhopper Assassin Bug, Zelus renardii, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Generalist predator (despite its common name suggesting host specificity).”  Zelus Assassin Bugs seem to bite humans more readily than most other Assassin Bugs, with the exception of blood-sucking Kissing Bugs, and though their bite is not considered dangerous to humans, it may leave the bite site tender and swollen.  They should be handled with caution to avoid bites.

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Thank you..  They do keep the flies at bay

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ascalapha (Probrably)
Location: South of Brazil
November 7, 2016 7:38 am
Every year, these caterpillars came and use to stay in different species of trees. The most commum tree is the Prunus selowii. They use to stay in a big group , normally .8 m to 1,0 abovo the ground. They are very predate by hemiptera insesct, as you can see in the picture.
Totally inofensive, I means, they don´t provoque any irritation in the skin when manipulate.
Signature: Wilsonpni

Possibly Morpho Caterpillars

Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars

Dear Wilsonpni,
Though your caterpillars resemble the caterpillar of a Black Witch,
Ascalapha odorata, based on this BugGuide image, we do not believe that is a correct identification.  We are pretty certain Black Witch Caterpillars do not feed in such aggregations.  Though the color is different, your caterpillars remind us of Morpho Caterpillars from our archives.  We will contact Keith Wolfe to get his opinion.  The image of the Predatory Stink Bug nymph feeding on a Caterpillar is a nice addition to our Food Chain tag.

Olá Daniel,
Nope, sorry, these are moth caterpillars, those of Morpho appearing distinctly different.
Abraços,
Keith

Aggregation of possibly Morpho Caterpillars

Aggregation of probably Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars

Update:  November 8, 2016
Thanks to a comment from contributor Cesar Crash of Insetologia, we now believe these are Giant Silkmoth Caterpillars from the genus
Arsenura.

Predatory Stink Bug preys on Caterpillar

Predatory Stink Bug preys on Caterpillar

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need to know…
Location: Stoddard, New Hampshire
October 14, 2016 6:03 am
one of these little guys was walking on my pup yesterday… and today…. he is on my kitchen table… catching a couple of “straggler” flies that have got in threw a broken screen… (thank god, because i hate flies)…. WHAT IS IT? I was thinking a baby praying mantis…??? but the head? and has no front little arms like a mantis…he had a hold of that fly though………. one thing for sure….. he made me smile…. he’s adorable. his little feet!!!
Signature: Patty Marotta

Assassin Bug nymph eats Fly

Assassin Bug nymph eats Fly

Dear Patty,
This is an Assassin Bug nymph in the genus
Zelus.  Though they are not aggressive towards humans, they can deliver a painful bite if carelessly handled.  Their mouths are adapted to piercing the exoskeleton and sucking the fluids from prey.  You can try capturing this Assassin Bug nymph in an overturned glass and transporting it back outside.  We will be post-dating your submission to go live to our site while we are away from the office at the end of the week.

thank you so much for the info. I’d kinda like to put him in an insect habitat….. seems everything i’ve been reading… they live 1-2 years in captivity… do you know if that is correct?
I have a couple of lady bugs in with him (DUG) right now… but he doesn’t seem interested. I’m thinking they might be too big for him? No?… i gave him a small spider yesterday… and he skawfed it RIGHT UP!!!! will he eat small crickets and meal worms?

Since Assassin Bugs are predators, we would expect them to eat any insects that move.  Perhaps the Lady Bugs are foul tasting.

thank you…. I bought him(DUG) a new home today….. complete with baby crickets and tiny meal worms…….. hope to see him eating soon! How long do you think he’ll live in the right conditions? He fascinates me… and made his appearance in my life at a very chaotic time, definitely something to keep my mind occupied…
Thanks again.

Perhaps a year in captivity.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Banded Garden Spider?
Location: Hialeah, Florida
September 8, 2016 7:43 am
I *think* this is a female Banded Garden Spider. I first saw it on August 14 and at first thought it was a tree snail due to the appearance of the back. The body was more than an inch long, and it stayed in its web in the same place for weeks, catching bees. I was rather hoping there would be a lot of baby spiders later, but a few weeks later there were 2 days of torrential rain during which time I didn’t look for her & when I did look, she was gone, leaving an intact web and no clue as to her disappearance. The third photo was one of a lucky series- I was taking a picture of her holding a webbed up bee when another bee landed in the web. She was on that second bee so fast I had to scramble to get pics! (I’ll send 3 more of the series in another query.)Spider webbing up caught bee. I chose these out of the series because one shows the bee clearly, and the other two do a fair job of showing the spinnerets in action.
Signature: Curious in Florida

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Dear Curious in Florida,
Thanks for sending in your wonderful images of a Banded Garden Spider or Banded Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata.  They are an excellent addition to our archives.

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

Banded Garden Spider Snares Honey Bee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination