Currently viewing the tag: "bug of the month"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Bug of the Month
Since we just returned from our holiday, we need to select a Bug of the Moth.  Rain Beetles in Southern California have been experiencing some nice December rainfalls, so they seem a likely candidate to be featured this month.

Subject: Pleocoma octopagina
Location: Wrightwood , Burn Area Dirt Road Turnouts, San Bernardino County, California, USA
January 1, 2017 9:39 am
This December 22, 23,and 24, 2016 ,I drove down from Lake Tahoe south to the Wrightwood Burn area roads just north of San Bernardino in Southern California and back thru rain and snow storms . Meeting up with Mr.Garin Woo for the first morning , we set out our Home made Black lights and Mercury Vapor lite in high hopes of getting some hard to get Pleocoma octopagina Robertson 1970 male Rain Beetles . They have the most Antennae laminae segments or fans of the Male Pleocoma which is 8 . And we were not disappointed !! The rain flights started at 5 am and were intermittent until 6 am and then became steady until 7am and ended. Some were seen still flying around in the growing morning sun lite. We received a very nice series of Flying Large Newly Hatched Male Pleocoma octopagina . Precise Lengths of males were 22 mm to 36 mm with metal calipers . They come out in limited numbers and were quite Large and robust this year . I stayed out a couple more mornings solo . This was even in a completely and totally Burned out ( this August 2016 ) area …..” Truly Toasted “. There is strong evidence to me that the majority of this area’s Bush’s ( highly resistant somewhat to fire ) are still alive under ground and can provide food for the Pleocoma grubs . I have have photo evidence that in adjacent past fires we have clear regrowth coming out of Completely burned terrain / Bushs . The laminae are extremely Thick and robust with their prominent ” 8 fan segments ” . They are very large and strong flyers for Pleocoma males and they came in to Garin’s Mercury Vapor lite the strongest . I spent some time looking for females to no avail .On the way home in the Snow Storm I had to have it in four wheel drive from Bishop all the way home to Tahoe at 20 to 45 MPH ! Cheers ! Gene St. Denis Sierra Nevada Research
Signature: Gene St. Denis

Rain Beetle

Rain Beetle

Dear Gene,
Our editorial staff was away for the recent southern California rains, but we are thrilled that you were able to continue to supply us with Rain Beetle sighting information.

Rain Beetle

Rain Beetle

Rain Beetle Habitat

Rain Beetle Habitat

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Brisbane
November 30, 2016 3:46 am
Huge moth dog was trying to get. Was wondering what it is?
Signature: Shaun

Giant Wood Moth we believe

Giant Wood Moth we believe

Dear Shaun,
We believe this is a Giant Wood Moth in the family Cossidae, possibly Endoxyla macleayi which is pictured on Butterfly House, though there are other similar looking species in the same genus.  We would not rule out that it might be a Ghost Moth in the family Hepialidae, a very similar looking family that is well represented on Butterfly House, and we should also point out that other members of the family Cossidae are represented on Butterfly House.  We have difficulty distinguishing between the two families.  Caterpillars of Wood Moths are known as Witchety Grubs.  Because of your timely submission, we have selected this posting as our Bug of the Month for December 2016.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Costa Rican tarantula – grey and black with red eyes
Location: Costa Rica
October 30, 2016 7:00 pm
Hi,
My husband and I live in Costa Rica, We have a large black tarantula that lives in a hole outside our front door. (2nd attached photo ) We’ve named her Harriet. 🙂 But we came across a very strange looking tarantula the other day – it is grey and black with red eyes (1st attached photo) I could not find anything online that looked similar so figured I would run it by you guys! Let me know what you think – thanks! We also found a 3rd tarantula at our house I also attached a photo of. It is hard to identify them online.
Signature: Kari Pinkerton Silcox

Huntsman Spider from Costa Rica

Huntsman Spider from Costa Rica

Dear Kari,
After opening three of your four email submissions, we feel confident stating that we expect you to thwart our ability to identify exotic species online before long.  This positively gorgeous spider is not a Tarantula, but rather a Huntsman Spider or Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.  They are easily confused with Tarantulas.  They are large, and they hunt nocturnally without building a web, and some tropical species are rumored to be quite venomous.  The first hint we had, other than starting with a known family and a location, was an image identified as “A huntsman spider, formerly
Olios now being reclassified” on Minibeast Wildlife on a page devoted to the attraction that “The spider fauna on the Osa Peninsula is rich and diverse.”  We found this image of a Huntsman posted to SpiderzRule/BadgeHuntsman page that is described as:  “About 3 to 3 1/2 inches across the legs. Found at night under a heliconia leaf along a rainforest stream at about 200 Meters elevation near Drake’s Bay, Costa Rica. No web seen.”  In this gorgeous WeHeartIt image, you can clearly see the eye pattern of the six eyes, and you can also discern that what you mistook for eyes are actually red ocelli or false eyes on the chelicerae.  Because of several reasons, beginning with the enthusiasm you have written to us with such lovely Costa Rican species, and because it is the First of the Month, we are tagging this submission as the Bug of The Month for November 2016.  Since we do not like to combine different taxonomical categories on our site, we will post your Tarantula images independently.  You are also making us want to start a Costa Rica tag. 

Huntsman Eye Pattern

Huntsman Eye Pattern

Thank you so much Daniel, I really appreciate your time. The interesting bugs in Costa Rica are mind blowing, we have endless photos of cool critters and I didn’t want to overwhelm your inbox too much with all my photos, although it was tempting, haha. But if you do a Costa Rica tag or section please let me know and I am happy to submit some more interesting insect photos!
I shared your Bug of the Month on my Costa Rica travel blog facebook page (Happy Coconuts Travel Blog), that is exciting to be featured. Thanks for doing what you do! 🙂
Here is a photo blog I published a while back on all the interesting creatures outside our door on the edge of the Osa Peninsula of Costa rica if you’re interested in checking out some more cool insect/bug/critter photos:
http://www.happycoconutstravelblog.com/blog/welcome-to-the-jungle
Pura Vida!
Kari Silcox
www.happycoconutstravelblog.com

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Caterpillar with Black Spikes
Location: Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Chinle, North Eastern AZ
September 30, 2016 11:09 am
Hello, I’m trying to identify this caterpillar (see photo) that we encountered at Canyon de Chelly. I have found some pictures of similar ones but nothing that looks exactly the same. Can you help?
Signature: Jeannette

Spiny Oakworm: Oslar's Oakworm

Spiny Oakworm: Oslar’s Oakworm

Dear Jeannette,
This is one of the Spiny Oakworms in the genus
Anisota, and because of your Arizona location, we are relatively certain it is Oslar’s Oakworm, Anisota oslari, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larva – last instars are brick red” and “Larvae are known to feed on oaks, including Mexican blue oak (Quercus oblongifolia), scrub oak (Q. turbinella), and Emory oak (Q. emoryi).”  There are several related species in the genus found in eastern North America as well, and we frequently get images of mating Oakworm Moths  and newly emerged Oakworm Moths submitted to our site.  Since it is the first of the month, we are tagging your submission as our Bug of the Month for October 2016.

Thanks so much – it’s a beautiful caterpillar and I was frustrated trying to find out what it was. Your site is great!
Jeannette

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant with enlarged head?
Location: Rochester, NY
August 30, 2016 10:18 am
Hi, I was studying in my dorm room in Rochester, NY when I noticed a little bug go scurrying by. At first I just thought it was ant carrying something black, but I quickly realized it was something far weirder. I was hoping you could identify it. Thanks.
Signature: Connor

Ant Mimic Jumping Spider

Ant Mimic Jumping Spider

Dear Connor,
Because we have gotten so many comments on the posting this summer, earlier in the week, we began featuring a five year old posting of an Ant Mimic Jumping Spider,
Myrmarachne formicaria, a species that was “Recently introduced from Europe” according to BugGuide where the range is listed as “Roughly Cleveland, OH to Buffalo, NY.”  BugGuide also notes:  “The first specimen records of M. formicaria from North America have all been from Ohio, USA: from Warren, Trumble County on 16 August 2001; the J.H. Barrow Field Station, Portage County on 15 September 2002; and at a residence near Peninsula, Summit County. Additional individuals have been observed by the third author in and around the J.H. Barrow Field Station and the Peninsula residence during the summers of 2003 and 2004. ”  Because of the timeliness of your submission, we have decided to make it the Bug of the Month for September 2016.  Readers who want to see a better image can use this BugGuide image for comparison.  If you have a sighting, please leave a comment with your location.  If you have your own image, you may submit it using the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.  We don’t know how this introduction will affect our native ecosystem, but it is possible that this Ant Mimic Jumping Spider may begin to displace native Jumping Spiders if it is a more efficient predator or if it preys upon our native species, and for that reason we are tagging it as an Invasive Exotic species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: borer ?
Location: Fredericksburg Va
July 30, 2016 7:29 pm
………….rainy times after hot dry spell
It was inside the house under a table lamp
A cloudy morning
Alive and still
One inch
Fredericksburg , Virginia
If it’s a borer of a tree of some sort…..we have MANY trees and many types>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
July 30th
If it”s a borer…it would be good to know its habitat!
Signature: susan warner

Ivory Marked Beetle

Ivory Marked Beetle

Dear Susan,
This is an Ivory Marked Beetle,
Eburia quadrigeminata, and according to BugGuide:  “hosts include a wide variety of hardwoods (oak, ash, hickory, locust, chestnut, maple, elm, beech, cherry); larvae bore in heartwood.”  According to MoBugs:  “Deciduous woodlands and the nearby area is their favored habitat, but they will often come to lights at night. Females deposit eggs on hardwood trees, usually in the cracks of bark. (Let me clarify here, they will only feed on dead or decaying trees, they will not harm healthy living trees…Thanks Ted for pointing out my oversight).When the larvae hatches it will eat its way into the heartwood of the tree. They feed on the wood pulp. Adults will readily come to fermented molasses bait. In large numbers these beetles could become serious pests to trees, and can cause significant damage. Because of their boring habit, and their capability of reaching the center of even the largest of trees it is not uncommon for these beetles to emerge as much as 10 to 40 years later in wood that was used to make furniture or hardwood flooring.”  We suspect this individual was probably attracted to light or had some other accidental reason for appearing in your home, but we would not rule out the possibility that it might have emerged from some finished wood product or firewood stored indoors.  Since today is the last day of July, and it is time for us to select a new Bug of the Month, we will be featuring your submission.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination