Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Cabot, Pa
Date: 06/17/2018
Time: 09:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Seen these two “mating”?
No one in the northern part of Pennsylvania seems to know what these their bugs are?
How you want your letter signed:  Marianne Barnhart

Mating Golden Backed Snipe Flies

Dear Marianne,
Many of the images of Golden Backed Snipe Flies submitted to our site come from Pennsylvania and Ohio, and many of the images we receive of Golden Backed Snipe Flies are of mating pairs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  weevils in the rainforest
Geographic location of the bug:  Rio Celeste de Upala near Rincon de la Vieja, Guanacaste,CR
Date: 06/12/2018
Time: 10:16 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Please help me to identify these weevils, they were very interesting in texture and I can’t find them in INBIO,http://coleoptera-neotropical.org/paginas/2_PAISES/C-Rica/Curculionoidea/Curculionidae-CRica.html, or anything else
thank you in advance
How you want your letter signed:  Weevils from Rio Celeste de Upala

Mating Weevils

Like you, we have not had any luck determining a species identity for these mating Weevils.  We did locate an image at the very bottom of the Homestead Brooklyn blog page devoted to Tapanti National Park that is unidentified and another similar looking individual from Selva Verde, Costa Rica that is unidentified on Alamy.  The Costa Rica Research page of the Microbiology at Occidental College site also has a similar looking unidentified Weevil on it.  Finally, we located your image on Jungle Dragon.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck than we have had.

Mating Weevils

Thank you for your help!
It is always very tricky to identify CR insects.  There are no books and no good web sites, only those meant for biological warfare identify ‘plagas’ or pests..
With best wishes
Annette

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Black and white bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern England
Date: 06/10/2018
Time: 03:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was seen in a garden center and it looks like it’s mating
How you want your letter signed:  Rick Powell

Mating Figwort Weevils

Dear Rick,
These are mating Figwort Weevils,
Cionus scrophulariae, which we identified on Bug Blog and the verified its identity on UK Beetle Recording.  According to Nature Spot:  “Fairly frequent and widespread in Britain with fewer records from the north” and the habitat is “Around the foodplants Figwort and Mullein.”

Mating Figwort Weevils

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Leopard moth mating
Geographic location of the bug:  Philadelphia
Date: 06/06/2018
Time: 10:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bug man. I was startled to see what I thought was an extra large moth then realized it appears they are mating.
How you want your letter signed:  Christine

Giant Leopard Moths Mating

Dear Christine,
Your images of Giant Leopard Moths mating are really beautiful.

Giant Leopard Moths Mating

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hot wasp lovin’
Geographic location of the bug:  Rio Grande Nature Center, Albuquerque NM
Date: 05/18/2018
Time: 04:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello!  We were in the nature center and came upon dozens of these wasps.   The smaller ones, which we assumed are males, were flying maybe an inch or so above the ground and clearly searching for something.  The larger one, which we assumed was a female, suddenly emerged from underground and the smaller ones went crazy.
She kept trying to get away but couldn’t fly because her wings weren’t dry.  I believe I caught the actual act of mating in one of the photos.  Are these scarab hunters?   It’s the closest we could come in identifying them, but there wasn’t an exact match in the field guide.
How you want your letter signed:  Mike

A pair of Scarab Hunter Wasps

Dear Mike,
Your images are awesome, and your written commentary is a marvelous observation.  We agree that these are Scarab Hunter Wasps in the family Scoliidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Our best guess is perhaps
Crioscolia alcione (see female here on BugGuide and male here on BugGuide) or possibly Trielis octomaculata which is also pictured on BugGuide.  Members of this family exhibit sexual dimorphism, and males are smaller and often with markings different from those of the females.  Based on your observations, the males sensed the pheromones of the female that was about to emerge, and they waited for her to dig to the surface. 

Mating Activity among Scarab Hunter Wasps

Thank you!  That certainly looks like them.  There were dozens and dozens of the males searching everywhere.  They were quite friendly and just zipped around us with mild interest.

Male Wasps are physically incapable of stinging. 

Mating Scarab Hunter Wasps

Oh yeah, right?  The stinger is a modified ovipositor.
The sheer number of searching males was the most impressive thing.  There were easily 4-5 per square foot.
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Cecropia Moths A-mating?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fayetteville, Georgia
Date: 05/05/2018
Time: 07:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there! My mom and I spotted this fuzzy lady hanging out on our front doorway around noon on May 5, 2018. She stayed there all day long, and when I checked again a little after seven, I discovered she had company.
Thanks to your website, I think they’re Cecropia Moths? I’m just a little unsure because the male is so much smaller and darker than the female.
How you want your letter signed:  Lauren C.

Female Promethea Moth

Dear Lauren,
Though they resemble Cecropia Moths, your mating pair are actually Promethea Moths,
Callosamia promethea, which are pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Females come to lights but males do not” though we suspect an exception is that a male will be attracted to a female who was attracted to a light.  BugGuide also indicates an alternate name is Spicebush Silkmoth and states:  “larvae feed on leaves of apple, ash, basswood, birch, cherry, lilac, maple, sassafras, sipcebush [sic], sweetgum, tulip-tree; also recorded on buttonbush, magnolia, and other trees adults do not feed.”

Mating Promethea Moths

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination