Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Mel Frank sent us this romantic couple of native Mantids in the genus Stagmomantis from his archives for your viewing pleasure.  We had been hearing about these images for some time and we are happy we are finally getting to post some Bug Love on a Woody Plant.  We are not sure if they are California Mantids or Bordered Mantids as both species are found in Southern California.

Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 09/16/2016
Time: Dusk
How you want your letter signed:  Mel Frank

Mating Mantids

Mating Mantids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Stick bug love?
Geographic location of the bug:  Gulfshores, Alabama
Date: 08/12/2018
Time: 01:22 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just sharing some bug loving.
How you want your letter signed:  Lower Alabama Bug guy

Mating Muskmares

Dear Lower Alabama Bug guy,
These are Two-Striped Walkingsticks in the genus
Anisomorpha, commonly called Muskmares because the much smaller male rides the larger female during mating, as your image illustrates, and because, according to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating Wedge shaped beetles
Geographic location of the bug:  Andover, NJ
Date: 08/06/2018
Time: 04:24 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was elated today when I found a male and female M.  limbata on my mint.  The male was intent on mating with the female and, initially, she rebuffed him.  Finally, she allowed him to mount her several times – I guess his fancy head-gear finally won her over.  Now, let’s see if I can catch her parasitizing a bee…
How you want your letter signed:  Deborah Bifulco

Mating Wedge Shaped Beetles

Wow Deborah,
In the words of mom “You have the patience of a saint” and your patience paid off in getting this amazing documentation of mating Wedge Shaped Beetles,
Macrosiagon limbata. You submitted the image of the male two days ago and requested an identification, and then you followed that with the image of the female yesterday, and now, bingo. 

Mating Wedge Shaped Beetles

We believe we have taken the images out of order for our posting because we wanted to open with (please forgive the pornography reference) the money shot to better appeal to our Facebook followers.  Thanks again for all of your amazing contributions to our archives over the years.  We would also encourage you to post these images to BugGuide which has a much greater reach than our own humble website, because despite six pages of images, they have no shots documenting the mating activity.  According to BugGuide:  “They go through hypermetamorphosis. The female deposits eggs on flowers frequented by bees. The first instar is a planidum, an active larva capable of climbing on a bee or bumble bee (their hosts). They are transported to the bee nest where they behave as parasitoids. The following instars don’t have legs and feed on the bee larvae and stored pollen and nectar.”

Pair of Wedge Shaped Beetles

Thanks!  I was pretty excited to be able to watch and photograph this – made the humid 90 F day seem suddenly bearable.  I’m quite interested in their reproductive cycle and wonder if I will be able to see the larval stage?  I’ve definitely got to do some digging to get more information on these fascinating little beetles.  It doesn’t seem like there is a lot of information about them.
Thanks for the suggestion on submitting the photos to bugguide – I will definitely do that.
And thanks for being as excited as I was to see this!
Deborah Bifulco

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Orgy on my Lemon Haze plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/05/2018
Time: 8:05 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Shortly after writing that the predators are controlling my little Grasshoppers, I witnessed this lurid behavior.  When I tried to get a better camera angle, they flew off.  There was a mating pair of Grasshoppers and a second male was watching from the sidelines.  Was he a voyeur or was he waiting his turn?
How you want your letter signed:  Constant Gardener

Mating Gray Bird Grasshoppers

Dear Constant Gardener,
We really don’t believe insects engage in voyeuristic behavior, nor do we believe Grasshoppers take turns.  We suspect this mature female Gray Bird Grasshopper,
Schistocerca nitens, released pheromones that attracted both males and either the one who arrived first or the more aggressive male got the prize.  We would have loved to have seen an image of the pair flying off in flagrante delicto.  We hope your crop is not decimated by Locusts because according to BugGuide:  “Apparently overwintering primarily as eggs, hatching over an extended season from spring to late summer (perhaps hatching is related to rainfall events?), and maturing from late spring till late summer or early autumn. Some adults overwinter, and perhaps nymphs too (?). It is possible that southward there are two broods, but this is not clear. In tropical regions south of the U.S., and perhaps in southernmost Texas and coastal California, all stages can be found at most any time of year.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Misumena vatia romance
Geographic location of the bug:  SW Virginia, USA
Date: 08/03/2018
Time: 03:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, this lovely yellow crab spider has been hanging out on a metal picnic table all week. I’ve visited and photographed her over several days. Yesterday, she had what I at first took for a baby but now think is a suitor! He’s just a fraction of her size and his coloration is considerably different. I am not sure how he found her, as there are no flowers or yellow colored items close by. You can just see her hiding under the leaf in the 3rd photo. I did not see them interact. What do you think? Also, what are the indentations that make her abdomen look upholstered? Thanks! Love your site!
How you want your letter signed:  Crab spider fan

Crab Spider

Dear Crab spider fan,
Though we cannot recall reading about pheromones and Spiders, there must be some means by which a male spider is able to locate a mate.  Your images, though they do not document any actual mating activity, are still a wonderful addition to our Bug Love page.

Pair of Crab Spiders

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fallsburg, Ohio
Date: 07/30/2018
Time: 08:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A friend asked for my help in identifying this insect. I’m not sure what it is and I’m curious as well because I saw one last week in Pataskala, Ohio. Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  However

Mating Mydas Flies

These mating Mydas Flies are identified as Mydas tibialis on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination