Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unique wasp like flying insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Missouri (Stone Co)
Date: 09/16/2017
Time: 12:39 PM EDT
I saw this unique wasp in our front yard today, one I’d never seen before. I’ve traveled all over the world had have seen some very unique insects and animals but this one is new and I can’t find any pictures of another. It is all black, is multi segmented but the rear segment tuts up like a scorpion rather than the more traditional wasp in this area. It has a very identifiable looking stinger somewhat like a dragonfly and the wings move as a bees with the familiar buzzing sound. Any assistance in identifying it would be great as I’ve never seen one around here. I’ve attached three pictures to help. It was hard to get the pics as it didn’t much care for me getting to close. Thanks.
How you want your letter signed:  JLQD

Mating Thread-Waisted Wasps

Dear JLQD,
This is not a single Sphecid Wasp represented in your images.  It is a mating pair of Thread-Waisted Wasps in the family Sphecidae, and if you look closely, you can see that he has her by the scruff of her neck and that their abdomens, each individually connected to the body by a thin pedicel that gives this family the collective common name of Thread-Waisted Wasps, are conjoined for the transference of spermatozoa.  They look similar to the Blue Mud Wasp that is depicted on BugGuide.

Mating Thread-Waisted Wasps

Mating Thread-Waisted Wasps

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identity of Two Winged Bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Thailand
Date: 09/15/2017
Time: 01:36 AM EDT
Salutations! Can you possibly identify these fabulous bugs?
I can’t find anything on them. Some are exquisite, some terrifying, but all are utterly rivetting! Thank you very much. I’m sending a few others, too.
How you want your letter signed:  Suzanne Jamsrisai

Mating Tiger Moths

Dear Suzanne,
These mating Tiger Moths are excellent wasp mimics.  We found a FlickR posting that looks like your species and it is identified as
Amata sperbiusINaturalist has numerous Asian sightings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ant/beetle blue and black, has wings and babies attached to it .
Geographic location of the bug:  Fredericton, new Brunswick, canada
Date: 09/15/2017
Time: 07:36 PM EDT
They were all in a patch of grass in a circle ,eating leaves . They have wings but wereel not flying.
How you want your letter signed:  Dalton

Mating Oil Beetles

Dear Dalton,
These are flightless, mating Oil Beetles in the genus
Meloe.  The larger partner is the female Oil Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Mating Patagonian Grasshoppers
Geographic location of the bug:  Argentine Patagonia
Date: 09/11/2017
Time: 02:52 PM EDT
This happy couple were photographed at the Upsala Glacier in the far south of Argentine Patagonia in December. Any idea what species?
How you want your letter signed:  Martin

Mating Flightless Grasshoppers

Dear Martin,
Your image of mating flightless Grasshoppers is gorgeous, and it is shot from the perfect angle to illustrate the activity.  We found a matching image on TravelBlog, but it is only identified as a Giant Flightless Alpine Grasshopper.  We will have to post this as unidentified and get back to it later.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What am I?
Location: South Jersey (August 2017)
August 24, 2017 9:29 am
Found this lounging on my picnic table. Looks like it’s giving a piggyback ride to another.
Signature: Jennifer Pierce

Mating Wheel Bugs

Dear Jennifer,
These are mating Wheel Bugs, the largest predatory Assassin Bugs in North America.  The angle of your image does not highlight the coglike protrusion on the thorax of adult Wheel Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Coastal South Carolina, inland about 8 miles
August 17, 2017 6:58 pm
I have seen these around the outside of my home always during the hot summer months, and usually at night. It appears to carry offspring on its back. It has long antennas on the front. Please tell me what this bug is.
Signature: Kristi Baker

Mating Muskmares

Dear Kristi,
What you have mistaken for an offspring is actually a mate.  These are Striped Walkingsticks in the genus
Anisomorpha, sometimes called Muskmares because they are frequently found mating, and the larger female Muskmare is able to carry her diminutive mate on her back.  According to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination