Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Ontario, Canada
Date: 07/19/2021
Time: 08:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bugman. These bugs seems to love my raspberry’s, they also love loving on the leaves(as you can see). Do you know what they are?
How you want your letter signed:  Sincerely, Andrew

Japanese Beetles Mating and Eating Raspberries

Dear Andrew,
Let us introduce you to the Japanese Beetle, a species loathed by American gardeners, especially those who grow roses, for over 100 years.  According to BugGuide:  “earliest record in our area: NJ 1916.”

Subject:  Stick Bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Gulf Coast Texas
Date: 06/28/2021
Time: 03:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this huge (fat) stick Bug looking insect on my front door late at night. It had a baby on it’s back as well. First time seeing this type of bug here.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks for any info.

Mating Muskmares

That ain’t no baby on her back.  The larger insect is a Female Two-Striped Walkingstick in the genus Anisomorpha and the smaller insect is her diminutive mate.  Two-Striped Walkingsticks are often observed mating, which has led to the common name Muskmare. According to BugGuide:  “Members of this genus can deliver a chemical spray to the eyes that can cause corneal damage” so you should exercise caution when closely observing them.

Subject:  Oak Eggar?
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 06/30/2021
Time: 07:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman :  This loving couple was found in Charlotte, NC. They look like oak eggar moths, but those live in the UK. Are they oak eggars or something else?
How you want your letter signed:  Jeremy in Charlotte

Mating Pink Striped Oakworm Moths

Dear Jeremy,
The European Oak Eggar is in the family Lasiocampidae and according to UK Moths:  “The Oak Eggar, despite its name, does not feed on Oak, but is so-called because the shape of its cocoon is acorn-like. ”  You have an image of mating Pink Striped Oakworm Moths,
Anisota virginiensis, which are pictured on BugGuide.  If our archives are any indication, sightings of mating Pink Striped Oakworm Moths are not uncommon.

 

Subject :  Copulating and Singing Brood 10 Cicadas
Geographic location of the bug:  Gaithersburg, Maryland
Date: 06/14/2021
Time: 07:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these two Cicadas lying in the middle of the road and decided to get them out of harms way and get a closer look.  This is screen shot from a video.  The disengaged and flew off about 15 minutes later.  Then without harming another cicada, I made a video of him singing and this is a screen shot from that video with a closeup of the organ used to do it. It is the gray triangular area.  This cicada flew off as soon as I released its wings.
How you want your letter signed:  NancyA

Mating Brood X Periodical Cicadas

Dear NancyA,
Thank you so much for sending in your excellent Brood X Periodical Cicada images.  Even in Los Angeles, our local news seems to have daily reports on the Brood X emergence.

Periodical Cicada

Subject:  Blue Milkweed Beetles
Geographic location of the bug: Westridge-Canyonback Wilderness Park, California
Date: 06/04/2021
Time: 9:25 AM PDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Readers,
Daniel was out hiking near the Getty Museam in a Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy park when he pointed out the Narrow-Leaf Milkweed that was just beginning to bloom to his hiking partners Naeemah and Sharon.  Some plants had numerous Blue Milkweed Beetles feeding on the leaves.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are obligate root feeders, and adults eat the leaves of larval host plants. Females are highly polyandrous, males engage in extended periods of post-copulatory mate guarding.”

Blue Milkweed Beetle

Milkweed is a very popular plant with many pollinating insects including butterflies, bees and wasps. so many years ago we created a Milkweed Meadow tag for the complex ecosystem that is associated with milkweed.

Blue Milkweed Beetle and Honey Bee

Update:  June 19, 2021  Mating Blue Milkweed Beetles
This weekend while hiking at the same location with Sharon and Melanie, Daniel spotted a solitary pair of mating Blue Milkweed Beetles.  He managed to get one image before the presumably male Blue Milkweed Beetle dropped to the ground.  Daniel felt somewhat guilty that his voyeurism led to coitus interruptus.

Mating Blue Milkweed Beetles

 

Subject:  Are these moths? And if so, what kind?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
Date: 06/01/2021
Time: 12:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi!
I found these two moths (possibly) today while I was photographing Dragonflies along the wet lands of Lake Tana in Ethiopia. Since I have never seen one like these, I am very curious to know what they are.
Thank you for your assistance.
How you want your letter signed:  Asrat (Bahirdar Photography)

Mating Tiger Moths

Dear Asrat,
These are mating Tiger Moths in the subfamily Arctiinae, and we found a matching image on Africa Wild that is identified as the Maid Alice Moth,
Amata alicia.  The indicated range on African Moths includes Ethiopia.