Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Pollen Thief
Geographic location of the bug:  Spartanburg SC
Date: 03/23/2020
Time: 08:40 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Good Morning,
Spring has sprung here in the Carolinas. I was watching the bees on a holly bush when I saw two bees, one much smaller than the other. The smaller bee got on the back of the larger bee, shook him like crazy and stole the pollen from his legs! Is this common in the bee world?
How you want your letter signed:  Mike Healy

Mating Eastern Carpenter Bees

Dear Mike,
This looks to us like a pair of mating Eastern Carpenter Bees,
Xylocopa virginica, and the male, who is on top, has a white face.  We do not think pollen thievery was on his mind.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults take nectar from many flowers, often biting into base of flower to “rob” it without pollinating (but seen to pollinate Passiflora incarnata quite effectively–pollen is deposited on thorax).”

Dear Daniel,
Thank you so much for the ID on my bees. Little did I know that I was interrupting an intimate moment! My son was morning the grass and the larger females were everywhere that there was a flower of any kind. Do three Carpenter bees sting? My son was terrified by then but they really didn’t seem to care about me, walking right up to them. I do remember from my childhood in CT, that there was a best of Carpenters in the garage and they would dive bomb us.
The picture that I took was that of the bees in a Holly bush. There were hundreds of them.
Thanks again for the education. I love What’s that bug!
Mike Healy

Hi Mike,
Male Carpenter Bees are incapable of stinging, and females are not aggressive and rarely sting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  This had just appeared in our garden 2 weeks ago
Geographic location of the bug:  Wangaratta, north east Victoria
Date: 10/19/2019
Time: 09:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thank you for your site. This bug appeared about 2 weeks ago and has the number has quickly increased since then.
How you want your letter signed:  Michael

Mating Red Banded Seed Eating Bugs

Dear Michael,
We were having trouble identifying your Seed Bugs from the family Lygaeidae, but we did locate a posting in our archives of a Red Banded Seed Eating Bug,
Melanerythrus mactans, from almost ten years ago.  Here is a FlickR image.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia, its range is over most of the continent.

Mating Red Banded Seed Eating Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Paramours of the arachnid persuasion
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbia, South Carolina, USA
Date: 10/16/2019
Time: 11:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, Bugman! I wanted to share this photo I took of (what I’m pretty certain are) Golden Silk Orbweavers. This lovely lady and her paramour have made their rather extensive home just outside my bathroom window. Her web is about 4 or 5 feet at its widest, plus the attaching guylines. Her body is about 3″ long and her legs make her even larger. He, on the other hand, barely makes it to 2″ with his legs. Her silk is a gorgeous yellow and looks quite fine in the sun.
How you want your letter signed:  Lissa Sprenne

Pair of Golden Silk Spiders

Dear Lissa,
Thanks so much for submitting your excellent images of a pair of Golden Silk Spiders,
Nephila clavipes.  Your images nicely illustrate the beautiful golden color of the web.  The female Golden Silk Spider is approximately 50 times larger than her diminutive mate.

Pair of Golden Silk Spiders

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Marin County, Ca
Date: 08/13/2019
Time: 09:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman, Woman or Bugster,  Can you tell me what these gorgeous creatures emerging are?  They’re on my redwood siding, and there’s a second wee house not yet ready to disgorge its person/s.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you so much!

Mating Lappet Moths

These appear to be mating Lappet Moths in the genus Tolype, with the remains of a cocoon.  We suspect the cocoon originally housed the female in the pair, and the male sensed her pheromones once she emerged.  Based on images posted to the Natural History of Orange County, we suspect the species is Tolype distincta.  Thanks for also including a good image of the cocoon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetles Matting
Geographic location of the bug:peter Laugheed Park, Alberta, Canada
Date: 08/11/2019
Time: 12:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found these bettles matting on Foxtail Barley along lake shore. Currious as to what they are.
How you want your letter signed:  Larry Halverson

Mating Red Turnip Beetles

Dear Larry,
Because we quickly recognized these as Leaf Beetles in the family Chrysomelidae, we were able to identify them as mating Red Turnip Beetles,
Entomoscelis americana, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “occasional pest of canola, rapeseed and mustard in the northern Great Plains; may also damage other crucifer crops (turnips, cabbage). Larvae and adults feed on plants at night.”

Mating Red Turnip Beetles

Thanks for your quick responce. Very interesting – Will let my son-in-law (a canola farmer) know about these as he saw them too although his farm is hunders of miles away
larry
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help needed to ID orange winged flying critter
Geographic location of the bug:  Atlantic Beach FL
Date: 07/30/2019
Time: 08:51 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My husband spotted this amorous couple on his early morning beach walk.Thanks to you who admire and respect all God’s creatures, great and small!
How you want your letter signed:  Lyvisky, Florida

Mating Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moths

Dear Lyvisky, Florida,
These are mating Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moths,
Empyreuma affinis, and they are harmless Tiger Moths that benefit from protective mimicry as they are easily mistaken for stinging wasps by predators.

Thank you, Daniel!! They do indeed resemble wasps. I’m always happy to meet new species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination