Currently viewing the tag: "bug love"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  This had just appeared in our garden 2 weeks ago
Geographic location of the bug:  Wangaratta, north east Victoria
Date: 10/19/2019
Time: 09:36 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thank you for your site. This bug appeared about 2 weeks ago and has the number has quickly increased since then.
How you want your letter signed:  Michael

Mating Red Banded Seed Eating Bugs

Dear Michael,
We were having trouble identifying your Seed Bugs from the family Lygaeidae, but we did locate a posting in our archives of a Red Banded Seed Eating Bug,
Melanerythrus mactans, from almost ten years ago.  Here is a FlickR image.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia, its range is over most of the continent.

Mating Red Banded Seed Eating Bugs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Paramours of the arachnid persuasion
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbia, South Carolina, USA
Date: 10/16/2019
Time: 11:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, Bugman! I wanted to share this photo I took of (what I’m pretty certain are) Golden Silk Orbweavers. This lovely lady and her paramour have made their rather extensive home just outside my bathroom window. Her web is about 4 or 5 feet at its widest, plus the attaching guylines. Her body is about 3″ long and her legs make her even larger. He, on the other hand, barely makes it to 2″ with his legs. Her silk is a gorgeous yellow and looks quite fine in the sun.
How you want your letter signed:  Lissa Sprenne

Pair of Golden Silk Spiders

Dear Lissa,
Thanks so much for submitting your excellent images of a pair of Golden Silk Spiders,
Nephila clavipes.  Your images nicely illustrate the beautiful golden color of the web.  The female Golden Silk Spider is approximately 50 times larger than her diminutive mate.

Pair of Golden Silk Spiders

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s that moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  Marin County, Ca
Date: 08/13/2019
Time: 09:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman, Woman or Bugster,  Can you tell me what these gorgeous creatures emerging are?  They’re on my redwood siding, and there’s a second wee house not yet ready to disgorge its person/s.
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you so much!

Mating Lappet Moths

These appear to be mating Lappet Moths in the genus Tolype, with the remains of a cocoon.  We suspect the cocoon originally housed the female in the pair, and the male sensed her pheromones once she emerged.  Based on images posted to the Natural History of Orange County, we suspect the species is Tolype distincta.  Thanks for also including a good image of the cocoon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetles Matting
Geographic location of the bug:peter Laugheed Park, Alberta, Canada
Date: 08/11/2019
Time: 12:48 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found these bettles matting on Foxtail Barley along lake shore. Currious as to what they are.
How you want your letter signed:  Larry Halverson

Mating Red Turnip Beetles

Dear Larry,
Because we quickly recognized these as Leaf Beetles in the family Chrysomelidae, we were able to identify them as mating Red Turnip Beetles,
Entomoscelis americana, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “occasional pest of canola, rapeseed and mustard in the northern Great Plains; may also damage other crucifer crops (turnips, cabbage). Larvae and adults feed on plants at night.”

Mating Red Turnip Beetles

Thanks for your quick responce. Very interesting – Will let my son-in-law (a canola farmer) know about these as he saw them too although his farm is hunders of miles away
larry
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Help needed to ID orange winged flying critter
Geographic location of the bug:  Atlantic Beach FL
Date: 07/30/2019
Time: 08:51 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My husband spotted this amorous couple on his early morning beach walk.Thanks to you who admire and respect all God’s creatures, great and small!
How you want your letter signed:  Lyvisky, Florida

Mating Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moths

Dear Lyvisky, Florida,
These are mating Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moths,
Empyreuma affinis, and they are harmless Tiger Moths that benefit from protective mimicry as they are easily mistaken for stinging wasps by predators.

Thank you, Daniel!! They do indeed resemble wasps. I’m always happy to meet new species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What type of fly is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Brantford, Ontario
Date: 07/26/2019
Time: 11:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Bugman,
I am hoping that you can help me identify this fly. I was leaning toward a type of syrphid fly but could not find a match online. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Dan

Signal Fly (left) and Red Milkweed Beetle

Dear Dan,
The image of the Fly with the Red Milkweed Beetle is an easier image for identifying purposes as it clearly shows the wing pattern on this Signal Fly in the genus
Rivellia which we determined thanks to images posted to BugGuide where it states the habitat is “on foliage, feces.”  We tried to determine if there is a relationship between Signal Flies and milkweed, and we located this BugGuide image and this BugGuide image and on The Pathless Wood we found an image and this information:  ” I did come across this interesting fly in my search, however, and later determined it is some sort of Signal Fly, a member of the Genus Rivellia. These flies are often difficult to identify from photographs alone; they are quite small, and identification depends on the presence or absence of tiny hairs called setae on the dorsal thorax, as well as the colour pattern of the wings and legs. They get their name from their patterned wings, which they tend to wave around as if signalling other individuals. I didn’t see this behaviour as this individual rested on an unopened milkweed blossom, so I was immediately taken with the unique pattern of its otherwise clear wings.”   So, for some reason, Signal Flies are attracted to milkweed, but we are not certain why.  Are there soybean fields nearby?  Your individual reminds us quite a bit of the Soybean Nodule Fly, Rivellia quadrifasciata, which is also pictured on BugGuide.

Mating Signal Flies

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for this information. There was a soybean field right next to this patch of milkweed so I think it may be safe to say Rivellia quadrifasciata is a match. I’ve seen other flies exhibit this behaviour of waving their wings around. Now I know where to start when trying to identify them.
Thanks again!
Dan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination