Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Rare spider?
Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
July 1, 2017 4:09 pm
Found this on my doorstep in Atanta, Georgia at night in the summer. (I moved it to a safer place where it was less likely to be noticed by a neighbor and killed).
Signature: Chris

Red Legged Purseweb Spider

Dear Chris,
We have not done any recent research on the Red Legged Purseweb Spider, but last we were aware, the species was considered endangered.  Your individual looks emaciated, and he might have benefited from a meal like a nice fat cricket.  We found this information on Animal Diversity Web:  “Red-legged purseweb spiders, although scarcely found in nature, are not listed on any conservation lists. (Reichling, et al., 2011).”  According to University of Kentucky Entomology:  “The Red-Legged Purseweb Spider (Sphodros rufipes, which may occur in Kentucky) has historically appeared on U.S. endangered species lists, but some scientists believe that it may not be a rare spider. ”  Because of your kind actions, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant flying monster
Location: Alberta, canada
June 29, 2017 8:41 pm
I rescued this from my kids pool, left it in the sunshine to dry out. My bug go to people have no idea. We live in northern alberta, Canada by the Athabasca river.
Signature: Susie Jack

Elm Sawfly

Dear Susie Jack,
This impressive creature is an Elm Sawfly, a non-stinging relative of Bees and Wasps.  Larvae of the Elm Sawfly look like caterpillars and they feed on leaves, and according to BugGuide:  “hosts include elm (
Ulmus), maple (Acer), birch (Betula), willow (Salix), and basswood (Tilia).”  Because of your rescue efforts, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible Dynastes in Christiansburg, Virginia
Location: Christiansburg, Virginia
June 23, 2017 5:44 am
Dear Sir,
We saved this specimen from certain death by car tire and are wondering if you can identify him. I thought it might be a male Dynastes tityus but the yellow coloring does not seem to match that species.
Signature: John Burke

Male Eastern Hercules Beetle

Dear John,
You are correct that this is a male Eastern Hercules Beetle, and it is our first reported sighting of the season.  Because of your kindness, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Birdbath victim?
Location: Memphis, TN
June 12, 2017 3:44 am
I’m a long-time reader and fan. I’m sorry the photos aren’t any better, but can you tell me what this lovely critter is? I saw it crawling around my birdbath before sunup this morning (June 12). When it got lighter and I went out to see if it was still there, the poor thing was *in* the birdbath. I fished it out, took photos, and then put the bug in a sort of hidden place on the ground so it can revive before a bird eats it (assuming it didn’t drown).
Thanks so much for your website. It’s a constant source of wonder to me.
Signature: Laurel

Mydas Fly

Subject: Birdbath victim part 2
Location: Memphis, TN
June 12, 2017 4:00 am
Is it mydas clavatus?
I’m happy to report that I just went out to check on this little critter, and it is alive! It has dried out enough to pull its wings in. So I don’t see the orange spot now, but I do see pretty iridescent wings covering it.
Signature: Laurel

Dear Laurel,
We apologize for the delay in responding.  We were away from the office for nearly two weeks and we are attempting to respond to as much unanswered mail as possible (an impossible task) and posting the best letters.  This Mydas Fly is indeed
Mydas clavatus, and your intervention in its life warrants tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found!
Location: Charlotte NC
May 28, 2017 8:08 am
Found this guy outside my front door! We moved him to a better area with some plants!
Signature: MW

Giant Stag Beetle

Dear MW,
This magnificent male Giant Stag Beetle or Elk Stag Beetle has some really impressive mandibles.  Stag Beetles pose no threat to humans and the males use their impressive mandibles to battle one another with the dominant male impressing the female so that he can pass on his genes.  According to BugGuide:  “There is some conservation concern about this species. The related
Lucanus cervus, of Europe, is threatened.  considered by Arkansas to be a “Species of Greatest Conservation Need” (SGCN).”  If you had on a porch light, that might have attracted this guy to your front door.  Because of your kindness in relocating this gorgeous Giant Stag Beetle to a location where he would be safe, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Giant Stag Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: San Diego, CA
April 28, 2017 8:47 am
Hello,
I found this little guy in my bath tub. released it outside. What kind of a bug is it?
Found April 28, 2017, San Diego, CA
Enjoy your day,
:0)
Signature: Enjoy your day, :0)

House Centipede

This is a predatory House Centipede, and because you captured and released it, allowing it to enjoy its day, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Too often, House Centipedes found indoors wind up tagged as Unnecessary Carnage.  Thanks for your kindness to the lower beasts and to your good wishes regarding our day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination