Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tiny and Friendly… Wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Greensboro, North Carolina U.S.A.
Date: 10/06/2017
Time: 01:19 PM EDT
I found this small, winged insect in my bathroom sink this morning. At first I thought he was dead, but when I put my finger in front of him he crawled onto my fingernail. I took him outside where he cleaned himself off, investigated my hand, and eventually flew away. To give you an idea of his size, that’s my pinky finger that he’s perched on. I’ve tried to identify him for the past hour with no luck. He seems to have the body shape of some of the spider wasps I’ve found on the Internet, but his size and coloring doesn’t match. Any help putting a name to my new “friend” would be wonderfully appreciated!
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you so much, Corey

Ichneumon

Dear Corey,
This is a Parasitoid Ichneumon Wasp and it looks like
Sphelodon phoxopteridis which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “hosts include various leafrollers (Tortricidae).” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Just rescued this from my dogs…
Geographic location of the bug:  Girard KS
Date: 09/26/2017
Time: 05:04 PM EDT
Just found my dogs trying to eat this little thing, so I rescued it. It’s approx 1.5″ long & about an inch wide. Looks like a tiny & very colourful dragonfly. Any idea what it is?
How you want your letter signed:  Chris K.

Scorpionfly

Dear Chris,
Because of your kindness to this Scorpionfly, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Deformed Luna Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  High Springs, Fl.
Date: 09/21/2017
Time: 07:05 PM EDT
I’m still not sure what I was seeing here but it looks to me like a Luna moth that didn’t enclose completely. It was crawling but obviously couldn’t fly. It kept falling over weeds and flipping onto It’s back so I put it on my oak tree and it energetically crawled far up the trunk.
How you want your letter signed:  Elizabeth C.

Newly Eclosed Male Luna Moth

Dear Elizabeth,
This is a newly eclosed male Luna Moth, but we do not believe it is deformed.  Metamorphosis is a process that takes time.  After the adult Luna Moth emerges from the cocoon, it might take several hours for the wings to expand fully and harden.  We suspect your individual eventually flew away to mate.  Because of your kindness, you may have helped this guy survive, so we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this guy?
Location: northern California
September 10, 2017 10:25 am
I would very much like this little guy identified! I found him caught in some old spider web and rescued him. He seems quite thankful 🙂 I initially thought he was a stick or stilt bug, but I’m not positive.
Signature: (is this for my name?) Rayne

Assassin Bug Nymph

Dear Rayne,
This is an Assassin Bug and we believe it is in the genus
Zelus, a group of insects that is often a subject of an inquiry to our site when a person has received a painful bite through careless handling or an accidental encounter.  Though not considered dangerous, the bite is reported to be quite painful.  You are lucky your kind deed did not result in a bite, but at any rate, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: South Korean insect
Location: Yongin, South Korea
August 11, 2017 9:26 am
Location: Yongin, South Korea (near Seoul).
Date: 11th of August 2017
Weather: Hot and humid (about 30 degrees Celsius)
I found this insect lying on its back on the outside of my hotel. The hotel is in urban area but there are small parks with ponds nearby.
When I turned it around it did not fly away but tried to climb the marble outer wall of the hotel. It lost grip (again ?) and fell back to the helpless position in which I spotted it the first time.
I held out my finger. It grabbed them and I set it into a small bush.
It did not move, just held on. Had no visible damage but seemed stunned or poisoned.
Did not try to fly a single time.
After 10 minutes it was still there. When I checked after one hour it was gone.
Hope it survived
Signature: Hertha

Cicada

Dear Hertha,
The green veined, black wings on this Cicada are beautiful.  We are attempting to identify the species for you. We are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian award.

Cicada

Dear Daniel,
thank you for the quick answer and your efforts to find out the species.
Hertha

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lucky Nighttime find an Imperial!
Location: Near St. Louis, MO
August 9, 2017 11:09 pm
I found this beautiful female Imperial Moth. Absolutely stunning! She was having a hard time flying and was battering herself against a corner. I quickly scooped her up (got a few quick photos) and released her into our wooded area out back. I was even lucky enough to observe her warming up her wings! My question is…what is the large spot on the top of her head? It appeared to have less hair than the rest of her body.
Signature: Fayla

Female Imperial Moth

Dear Fayla,
The tattered wings on your female Imperial Moth indicates she has probably neared the end of her very short life.  The hairlike scales on her thorax have worn away which is revealing the exoskeleton, and that is the “spot” you noticed.  Because of your kindness, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination