Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible Dynastes in Christiansburg, Virginia
Location: Christiansburg, Virginia
June 23, 2017 5:44 am
Dear Sir,
We saved this specimen from certain death by car tire and are wondering if you can identify him. I thought it might be a male Dynastes tityus but the yellow coloring does not seem to match that species.
Signature: John Burke

Male Eastern Hercules Beetle

Dear John,
You are correct that this is a male Eastern Hercules Beetle, and it is our first reported sighting of the season.  Because of your kindness, we are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Birdbath victim?
Location: Memphis, TN
June 12, 2017 3:44 am
I’m a long-time reader and fan. I’m sorry the photos aren’t any better, but can you tell me what this lovely critter is? I saw it crawling around my birdbath before sunup this morning (June 12). When it got lighter and I went out to see if it was still there, the poor thing was *in* the birdbath. I fished it out, took photos, and then put the bug in a sort of hidden place on the ground so it can revive before a bird eats it (assuming it didn’t drown).
Thanks so much for your website. It’s a constant source of wonder to me.
Signature: Laurel

Mydas Fly

Subject: Birdbath victim part 2
Location: Memphis, TN
June 12, 2017 4:00 am
Is it mydas clavatus?
I’m happy to report that I just went out to check on this little critter, and it is alive! It has dried out enough to pull its wings in. So I don’t see the orange spot now, but I do see pretty iridescent wings covering it.
Signature: Laurel

Dear Laurel,
We apologize for the delay in responding.  We were away from the office for nearly two weeks and we are attempting to respond to as much unanswered mail as possible (an impossible task) and posting the best letters.  This Mydas Fly is indeed
Mydas clavatus, and your intervention in its life warrants tagging this submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found!
Location: Charlotte NC
May 28, 2017 8:08 am
Found this guy outside my front door! We moved him to a better area with some plants!
Signature: MW

Giant Stag Beetle

Dear MW,
This magnificent male Giant Stag Beetle or Elk Stag Beetle has some really impressive mandibles.  Stag Beetles pose no threat to humans and the males use their impressive mandibles to battle one another with the dominant male impressing the female so that he can pass on his genes.  According to BugGuide:  “There is some conservation concern about this species. The related
Lucanus cervus, of Europe, is threatened.  considered by Arkansas to be a “Species of Greatest Conservation Need” (SGCN).”  If you had on a porch light, that might have attracted this guy to your front door.  Because of your kindness in relocating this gorgeous Giant Stag Beetle to a location where he would be safe, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Giant Stag Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: San Diego, CA
April 28, 2017 8:47 am
Hello,
I found this little guy in my bath tub. released it outside. What kind of a bug is it?
Found April 28, 2017, San Diego, CA
Enjoy your day,
:0)
Signature: Enjoy your day, :0)

House Centipede

This is a predatory House Centipede, and because you captured and released it, allowing it to enjoy its day, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  Too often, House Centipedes found indoors wind up tagged as Unnecessary Carnage.  Thanks for your kindness to the lower beasts and to your good wishes regarding our day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible trapdoor spider?
Location: Eastern Kentucky
April 11, 2017 2:29 pm
I was pulling up clumps of ornamental grass from a raised bed and noticed a white “sack” that came up on the roots of one clump. There was a tear on one side of the sack and I could see a large, dark, shiny spider inside. While I was trying to figure out what to do about it, I noticed tiny spiders crawling out of the sack. (The second image shows them.) I’m assuming they were her babies. I left her there with the youngsters while I finished cleaning the raised bed. When I came back, she had crawled out of the nest and was walking across the deck. I encouraged her to move where she wouldn’t be stepped on and put the clump of grass and nest beside her. I went back later, but she was nowhere to be seen. I’ve checked the images here on whatsthatbug and I think she’s a trapdoor spider.
Signature: Kentucky Gin

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

Dear Kentucky Gin,
We agree that this is a Trapdoor Spider, probably a female Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider in the genus
Ummidia based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Dig tunnel in ground and seal with a silk-hinged lid. They hide under this lid and make forays out when prey is sensed, presumably by vibration. Males are often found wandering in late spring, presumably looking for mates.”  Because of your gentle kindness in relocating this little lady, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider with Spiderlings

Cork-Lid Trapdoor Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What magical creature is this?
Location: Middle of Austria
March 24, 2017 5:18 am
Hi Daniel! I found this beautiful moth today on the tiles of an underground passageway at the local train station (middle of Austria). The temperature was in the 40s, so the moth was pretty sluggish. I rescued it from being stepped on and spent a good 5-10 minutes communing with it before I put it on a tree. What really impressed me was the range of colors, and the fact that the “eyes” look like they were done with silver cloisonne. Can you tell me what this magical creature is?
Signature: N. Fritz

Female Emperor Moth

Dear N. Fritz,
A catchy subject line is always the best way to get our attention and to stand out from much of the chaff we receive, and your “magical creature” reference immediately caught our attention.  This is a female Emperor Moth in the genus
Saturnia.  It might be Saturnia pavonia, a species pictured on Moths of Europe where it states:  “Female Emperor moths possess an organ at the tip of their abdomen from which they disseminate pheromones to attract the day-flying males. A single freshly emerged female can attract as many as 70 males, which can detect the pheromones from distances of a kilometre or more away, using their strongly pectinated antennae as “radar” to home in on the female.  The females are heavily laden with eggs so are unable to fly very far, and after mating lay most of their eggs very near the spot where they emerge. After laying 100 or so eggs they have lightened their load sufficiently to enable them to fly, but unlike the males they fly by night. It takes them about 2-3 days to complete egg laying.  Neither sex has a proboscis, so the moths are unable to feed, and only live until their body fats are exhausted – i.e. about 4 or 5 days.”  The Saturniidae of the Western Palaearctic also has information on the Small Peacock Moth.  A similar looking larger species found in Europe is the Giant Peacock Moth, Saturnia pyri, which is pictured on Saturniidae of the Western Palaearctic where it states:  “Most adults emerge in the late morning, with females calling that same night, often from the base of trees up which they have climbed. Pairing takes place just before midnight and lasts for about 22 hours. After separation, the male flies off in search of another mate. If possible, the female climbs to the highest vantage point possible before launching herself clumsily towards the nearest shadow on the horizon which, often as not, is a tree. The reason for this strange behaviour is that most females carry too many eggs at first and are ‘bottom-heavy’. This stop-start process continues until about 30 eggs have been deposited, usually in chains of five to eight on the trees’ branches or trunk. The rest of the eggs are laid on the leaves and twigs of suitable hosts.”  We will try to get exact species confirmation from Bill Oehlke.  Meanwhile, since you rescued this magical creature from stomping feet in the station and put her on a tree where she may attract a mate, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Emperor Moth

Dear Daniel,
I’m honored to be a bug humanitarian! Somehow I intuitively knew to put this beauty on a tree. Thanks for posting the pix to What’s That Bug? and for enlightening me on the mating habits of emperor moths!
N. Fritz

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination