Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: House Centipedes
Location: Pennsylvania
December 10, 2016 6:34 am
I am a great fan of your site, especially since there seems to be no shortage of interesting photos of unidentified invertebrates from around the world. Among these, there is truly a wealth of Scutigeromorpha pictures on this site, and what saddens me is that most of them are smashed into oblivion.
I’ve always liked centipedes. The local library had a sizable centipede population, and I would discreetly capture and release said centipedes, which are largely gone now due to construction. When I visited my cousins nearby, I noticed they had a house centipede infestation in their backyard, in a leaf pile. Most of these were smaller than a penny and pale gray. My cousins said they rarely saw them inside. Then, my uncle returned with a load of bricks in his car, and among them were a juvenile five-lined skink and the largest house centipede I’ve ever seen. Both escaped uncaught. But then, the next day, I saw a young house centipede dangling in a spiderweb with all of its left legs gone. I rescued the poor ‘pede and as my cousins watched, fed it some spiders. Soon, after, another, smaller house centipede was found. After delivering a “no-kill” lecture to my cousins, I took the ‘pedes home as pets. Soon after their capture and subsequent feeding, both centipedes molted. What was truly amazing was the first centipede regrew all of its missing legs! Two molts later, both ‘pedes are doing fine in separate containers with substrate and bark. I would like to know if these Scutigeromorphae are different species; one is tan and the other is very dark. Also, how large does the average Scutigera coleoptrata get? What temperatures are required for the winter? Thanks for the answers and speedy reply that I know will come!
P.S. : Perhaps I will eventually email you guys a story about my encounters with praying mantids over the summer.
Signature: Lawn/Shrimp

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Lawn/Shrimp,
First we need to tell you how much we enjoyed your submission, and because of your attempts to relocate House Centipedes and to educate your relatives, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  We have read before that partial leg regeneration may be possible with young centipedes and spiders, and according to About Education:  “Should a centipede find itself in the grip of a bird or other predator, it can often escape by sacrificing a few legs. The bird is left with a beak full of legs, and the clever centipede makes a fast escape on those that remain. Since centipedes continue to molt as adults, they can usually repair the damage by simply regenerating legs. If you find a centipede with a few legs that are shorter than the others, it’s likely in the process of recovering from a predator attack.”  According to BugGuide, the House Centipede family Scutigeridae has only two genera, and one of them,
Dendrothereua, is found west of the Mississippi River based on BugGuide date.  The other genera contains only the species known commonly as the House Centipede according to BugGuide, so our best guess is that despite the differing coloration, both of your individuals are the common House Centipede,  Scutigera coleoptrata.  Based on BugGuide information:  “Indoors they are likely to be found at all times of the year provided they have warmth and available prey. In the north they will only be found outside during Summer.”  That leads us to speculate that you should not let temperatures get below 40 degrees Fahrenheit if they cannot shelter without freezing.  BugGuide lists the size as “body length to 3 cm (1.2 inches)” but that does not include the long legs.

House Centipede

House Centipede

House Centipede

House Centipede

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Bug
Location: Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
November 23, 2016 9:02 pm
Hi Bugman
I found this Big Bug in my bath tub this morning. My son is an avid wildlife enthusiast so we caught it so the other kids could see it before we release it. i would like to know what it is so we can give the kids info about it.
Signature: Candy

Longicorn: Acanthophorus confinis

Longicorn: Acanthophorus confinis

Dear Candy,
About a week and a half ago we posted an image of a Longicorn from Tanzania that we believe we correctly identified as
Acanthophorus (Tithoes) confinis.  Upon researching that posting, we found an individual offered for sale on Ebay for $450.00, leading us to speculate this must be a rare species.  Your individual is a male, as evidenced by the well developed mandibles.

Hi Daniel
I think that is exactly what it is.  After I caught it and took it to the school for the kids to look at I also posted a picture of it on Simply the Best Bulawayo Notice Board on Facebook and to my surprise about 4 other people said they had also seen them in their homes and yards recently. My specimen will not be gracing Ebay but will be released in the school ground where another one was released a week ago hopefully to go and breed.

Hi Candy,
We are thrilled to hear you will not be profiting from your discovery.  We are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big LA Jumping Spider?
Location: Venice, CA
November 2, 2016 11:36 am
Dear Bugman,
Once again, I call upon you to help me identify a little critter that has terrified my wife. This guy was big, bigger than a quarter, and its orange thorax and black and grayish stripped legs were very distinct and quite beautiful. I assume this is some type of Jumping Spider…maybe originally from Mexico, maybe a male looking for a mater? Any help identifying would be great. You’ll be happy to know that after a conversation with the spider it walked out on its own.
Signature: -Teacher Todd

Johnson's Jumper

Johnson’s Jumper

Dear Teacher Todd,
Our money is on this being Johnson’s Jumper,
Phidippus johnsoni, a species described on BugGuide as being:  “Mostly black with a red abdomen. The male’s abdomen is entirely red, whereas the female’s abdomen has a black mark down the center.”  This BugGuide image is a good match.  Because of your tolerance, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden Silk Spider respite
Location: Charleston, SC
October 18, 2016 5:21 pm
Thought you might enjoy this image. This gal had been residing beside the house for some time when we had an unexpected cold spell. She was pretty lethargic in the web and I thought she might fall prey to a blue jay or something. So, I brought her inside for a couple of days until it warmed back up. She seemed fine when I took her back out, she remade her web and, I think made an egg sack (her abdomen had diminished greatly in size one day not too long after). Here’s to hopes for the next generation.
Signature: Norm Shea

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear Norm,
Your kindness to this Golden Silk Spider definitely deserves the Bug Humanitarian Award.  We hope you have future generations in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug In Austin, Texas
Location: TX
October 17, 2016 7:15 pm
I found this bug in my gym bag on 10/13/16. I found the bug on the University of Texas at Austin campus. The bug has a long black body divided into two parts. Half of the bottom of the back is transparent. I captured the bug (because it got into my room) and released it outside. The attached photos are the bug in a plastic case.
Signature: TKR

Black Soldier Fly

Black Soldier Fly

Dear TKR,
Because of the transparent part of the body you observed, the Black Soldier Fly,
Hermetia illucens, is sometimes called a Window Fly.  It is described on BugGuide as being:  “Large soldier fly, all black with bright white tarsi. Underneath, first abdominal segment has clear areas. Wings have purplish sheen. Likely a wasp mimic, it buzzes loudly.”  This is a harmless species that does not sting nor bite.  Because of your catch and release handling of this sighting, we are tagging the posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.   

Black Soldier Fly

Black Soldier Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fat Weird Caterpillar
Location: Maryland
September 11, 2016 5:27 pm
Hey!
Apparently this fell on my cousin out of a tree (no worries she put it back and it was NOT harmed in anyway) and I’m not quite sure what it is, perhaps you may know? I’ve never seen one like it around here, but maybe it’s common? Let me know when you get the chance and thank you for all you do!
Signature: Rochelle

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Imperial Moth Caterpillar

Dear Rochelle,
This is the caterpillar of an Imperial Moth, and its size and color indicate that it is getting ready to transform into a pupa, which it does underground.  When that time approaches, the normally green caterpillar changes color and loses interest in eating leaves.  It falls or descends to the ground and find a suitable place to dig.  While your cousin had good intentions to place it back in the tree, this individual most likely immediately set upon getting back on the ground.  Because of your cousins kind intentions, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Hello Daniel!
Thank you so much for getting back to me, you literally made my day! I work at a bagel shop where we have a dry erase board where we put fun facts and trivia for people to look at while they eat and I’m going to make the caterpillar of the Imperial Moth the Animal of the day! Ill send you a picture when it’s done! Thank you again, you and your team are truly great people and its awesome to know that there are other bug friendly enthusiasts out there! Have a wonderful evening,
Rochelle

Female Imperial Moth

Female Imperial Moth

In honor of you and your peeps and for the magnificent creature that is the Imperial moth. I’m actually a decent artist but its hard to draw with dry erase markers.. Also I just saved an Imperial Moth from the hallway of my apartment a few weeks ago and I’m pretty mad at myself for not knowing what the pre-pupa form looked like… Either way, thank you again for the response and keep up the good work!
Rochelle

Imperial Moth Art

Imperial Moth Art  (click to enlarge)

Wow, thanks for the awesome update.

No problem! I’m honestly just thrilled that you took the time to write back and now that I know you have a book for sale… 😀

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination