Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Sphinx Moth ? Maybe ??
Geographic location of the bug:  Titusville Florida
Date: 05/05/2021
Time: 06:20 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Photos of a gorgeous moth I think might be a Sphinx Moth
Rescued from a bully in a fast food drive thru hahaha
I sent a previous comment telling the story:  “I spotted a sphinx moth in titusville florida today may 6 2021. It was on a drive thru sign under the florescent lights.  I was waiting my turn to pay and saw that the driver of the car in line behind me, he was saw it too and seemed to be trying to kill the moth by try by swinging a old paper at it, reaching out their car window…
So I said Hey! Don’t do that, it isn’t harming you! And then I drove back around and got it off the post and relocated it to a nearby tree.  I have pictures I can share if you wish.”
I just couldn’t let it be killed for no reason at all so I put it on a nearby tree
( It was approximately 530am so I think it can get itself hidden before the birds get woken up & and the birds go looking for bugs to eat )
How you want your letter signed:  Tee Holden

Rescued Streaked Sphinx

Dear Tee,
We love your story and we pasted together your comment and your submission so our readers have have the entire story of how you saved this Streaked Sphinx from a bully at a drive through.  Because of your heroism, we are awarding you the Bug Humanitarian Award for the first time in well over a year and a half.  May we just add that the color scheme on your images is awesome.  It has been even longer that we have tagged a posting as a Buggy Accessory, but the moth and your purple nail polish is a fetching combination. And just because we can, we are also displaying your posting on our scrolling feature bar.

Streaked Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Nice specimen
Geographic location of the bug:  Gatineau, quebec canada, september
Date: 10/25/2019
Time: 09:06 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this specimen in my pool when I noticed a lot of splashing. Seems it drops from my tree because of wind. Had a little mouth and big eyes.
How you want your letter signed:  Pat

Cicada Rescued from Pool

Dear Pat,
We were going to comment that this is a very late season sighting of a Cicada, and we realized you shot the image in September.  We do not recognize your Cicada.  It is quite dark in color, but we suspect it is one of the Annual Cicadas in the genus
Neotibicen which is well represented on BugGuide.  Because of your kindness in preventing this individual from drowning, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Cicada

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Polyphemus
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 10/06/2019
Time: 01:56 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this almost becoming prey to a bird when I came outside. Luckily I scared the bird off but the moth was struggling to get up. I put the dog inside and came back out to find it waddling up the tree to safety. Can you tell if it’s a female, pregnant, or going to be ok? Is there anything I can do?
How you want your letter signed:  Concerned neighbor

Female Polyphemus Moth

Dear Concerned neighborh,
This is indeed a Polyphemus Moth and she is a female moth.  Since all Giant Silkmoths, including the Polyphemus, do not feed as adults, they only have a few days to mate and produce a new generation, so virtually all female Polyphemus Moths are “pregnant”.  You should let nature takes its course, but your kind actions in rescuing this individual from a bird has earned you the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Green Lynx Spider
Geographic location of the bug:  Mt. Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Date: 09/23/2019
Time: 04:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
Harvest season is here and I noticed this very swollen Green Lynx Spider on the second generation descendant of a seed that came from a Woodhead bud purchased at Cornerstone Collective about three years ago.  I harvested the plant on Saturday, but on Friday I noticed the Green Lynx Spider was much thinner and she was now guarding an egg sac.  Needless to say, I did not need the buds on half of the bifurcated stem, so I tied an orange tag on the stem that reads “Spider Nursery” and I will let her live out her days guarding her eggs before I harvest the remaining buds so she will have habitat around her.
How you want your letter signed: Constant Gardener

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Constant Gardener,
We always enjoy your submissions, but because of your self sacrificing impulse regarding the survival of your Green Lynx Spider’s brood, we are bequeathing you with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Green Lynx Spider with Egg Sac

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Praying mantis (patreon)
Geographic location of the bug:  Lewis Center OH
Date: 09/12/2019
Time: 10:29 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve never seen such a pale colored mantis.  I supposed it molted recently?  It looks opalescent, so beautiful!  I found it trapped in the vestibule of the Tim Hortons.
How you want your letter signed:  Jennifer Huffman

Female Carolina Mantis

Dear Jennifer,
This is an adult female Carolina Mantis.  Though she has wings, she is not capable of flight.  Only the adult males can fly.  Carolina Mantids can be either brown or green, and sometimes a combination.  Though this individual is light, the color does not seem unusually light to us.  Because of your kindness prompting you to release this Carolina Mantis from the vestibule where you found her trapped, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What an honor!  I’d like to take this opportunity to thank my husband, who patiently waits for me to inspect and photograph bugs everywhere we go.

Sorry one follow up question … on your site it seems to be spelled “preying” mantis, but I had always understood the word as “praying” mantis?

Hi again Jennifer.  We know that Praying Mantis is the more common spelling, but we prefer Preying Mantis.  Here is an explanation we gave a reader 13 years ago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Fuzzy Buzzy Bee
Geographic location of the bug:  23454 – Va Beach, VA
Date: 08/18/2019
Time: 05:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve noticed a new pollinator in our gardens this summer but don’t recognize the species.  I’m estimating 20-25MM in length, fairly robust, but not “chunky” like a bumble bee.  I saved one in our pool and grabbed a couple closeups of their uniquely colored eyes.  He/she flew away safely  :-]
How you want your letter signed:  W/ appreciation

Thank you for the response.  I see many similarities, however the size, shape, and coloring of the eyes do not correspond.  Head scratcher.  :-]

Eastern Carpenter Bee

Hello again,
Because you wrote back, we took a look at all your images and we believe you have submitted images of two different species.  We still believe the individual on the flowers is a Bumble Bee, but the one you saved from the pool appears to be an Eastern Carpenter Bee.  Check out the similarity in the eyes with this individual posted to BugGuide of
Xylocopa virginicaMale.  As you can see from this BugGuide image, the Eastern Carpenter Bee has a dark colored abdomen, which is why we feel certain you have submitted two different species.  Since you rescued this individual, we are tagging the posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Eastern Carpenter Bee

I’m sorry for creating confusion!  …but am grateful for your extra effort :-]
Thanks guys!!
R/ M Coughlin

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination