Currently viewing the tag: "Bug Humanitarian Award"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What magical creature is this?
Location: Middle of Austria
March 24, 2017 5:18 am
Hi Daniel! I found this beautiful moth today on the tiles of an underground passageway at the local train station (middle of Austria). The temperature was in the 40s, so the moth was pretty sluggish. I rescued it from being stepped on and spent a good 5-10 minutes communing with it before I put it on a tree. What really impressed me was the range of colors, and the fact that the “eyes” look like they were done with silver cloisonne. Can you tell me what this magical creature is?
Signature: N. Fritz

Female Emperor Moth

Dear N. Fritz,
A catchy subject line is always the best way to get our attention and to stand out from much of the chaff we receive, and your “magical creature” reference immediately caught our attention.  This is a female Emperor Moth in the genus
Saturnia.  It might be Saturnia pavonia, a species pictured on Moths of Europe where it states:  “Female Emperor moths possess an organ at the tip of their abdomen from which they disseminate pheromones to attract the day-flying males. A single freshly emerged female can attract as many as 70 males, which can detect the pheromones from distances of a kilometre or more away, using their strongly pectinated antennae as “radar” to home in on the female.  The females are heavily laden with eggs so are unable to fly very far, and after mating lay most of their eggs very near the spot where they emerge. After laying 100 or so eggs they have lightened their load sufficiently to enable them to fly, but unlike the males they fly by night. It takes them about 2-3 days to complete egg laying.  Neither sex has a proboscis, so the moths are unable to feed, and only live until their body fats are exhausted – i.e. about 4 or 5 days.”  The Saturniidae of the Western Palaearctic also has information on the Small Peacock Moth.  A similar looking larger species found in Europe is the Giant Peacock Moth, Saturnia pyri, which is pictured on Saturniidae of the Western Palaearctic where it states:  “Most adults emerge in the late morning, with females calling that same night, often from the base of trees up which they have climbed. Pairing takes place just before midnight and lasts for about 22 hours. After separation, the male flies off in search of another mate. If possible, the female climbs to the highest vantage point possible before launching herself clumsily towards the nearest shadow on the horizon which, often as not, is a tree. The reason for this strange behaviour is that most females carry too many eggs at first and are ‘bottom-heavy’. This stop-start process continues until about 30 eggs have been deposited, usually in chains of five to eight on the trees’ branches or trunk. The rest of the eggs are laid on the leaves and twigs of suitable hosts.”  We will try to get exact species confirmation from Bill Oehlke.  Meanwhile, since you rescued this magical creature from stomping feet in the station and put her on a tree where she may attract a mate, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Emperor Moth

Dear Daniel,
I’m honored to be a bug humanitarian! Somehow I intuitively knew to put this beauty on a tree. Thanks for posting the pix to What’s That Bug? and for enlightening me on the mating habits of emperor moths!
N. Fritz

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: anisota virgeniensis eggs
Location: winter park, fl
March 9, 2017 5:11 pm
I found a group of eggs outside on the floor which are from the Anisota virgeniensis family. what should I do with them? what do they feed on? how long do they take to hatch? I’m trying to figure out what tree to put them on, what leaves..
Signature: Natasha

Oakworm Eggs

Dear Natasha,
We are impressed that you were able to identify these eggs and puzzled why you did not know the answer to some of your questions once you had an identity.  Your eggs do indeed look like the eggs of a Pink-Striped Oakworm,
Anisota virginiensis, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of oak.”  We suspect the eggs will likely hatch when new growth is sprouting on the oaks.

I had put them on an oak tree, but I wanted to make sure I was doing the right thing because I would’ve been upset if I didn’t. I tend to overthink things and I like to be re-assured of an answer. Thank you for your response.

We are tagging your posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: House Centipedes
Location: Pennsylvania
December 10, 2016 6:34 am
I am a great fan of your site, especially since there seems to be no shortage of interesting photos of unidentified invertebrates from around the world. Among these, there is truly a wealth of Scutigeromorpha pictures on this site, and what saddens me is that most of them are smashed into oblivion.
I’ve always liked centipedes. The local library had a sizable centipede population, and I would discreetly capture and release said centipedes, which are largely gone now due to construction. When I visited my cousins nearby, I noticed they had a house centipede infestation in their backyard, in a leaf pile. Most of these were smaller than a penny and pale gray. My cousins said they rarely saw them inside. Then, my uncle returned with a load of bricks in his car, and among them were a juvenile five-lined skink and the largest house centipede I’ve ever seen. Both escaped uncaught. But then, the next day, I saw a young house centipede dangling in a spiderweb with all of its left legs gone. I rescued the poor ‘pede and as my cousins watched, fed it some spiders. Soon, after, another, smaller house centipede was found. After delivering a “no-kill” lecture to my cousins, I took the ‘pedes home as pets. Soon after their capture and subsequent feeding, both centipedes molted. What was truly amazing was the first centipede regrew all of its missing legs! Two molts later, both ‘pedes are doing fine in separate containers with substrate and bark. I would like to know if these Scutigeromorphae are different species; one is tan and the other is very dark. Also, how large does the average Scutigera coleoptrata get? What temperatures are required for the winter? Thanks for the answers and speedy reply that I know will come!
P.S. : Perhaps I will eventually email you guys a story about my encounters with praying mantids over the summer.
Signature: Lawn/Shrimp

House Centipede

House Centipede

Dear Lawn/Shrimp,
First we need to tell you how much we enjoyed your submission, and because of your attempts to relocate House Centipedes and to educate your relatives, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  We have read before that partial leg regeneration may be possible with young centipedes and spiders, and according to About Education:  “Should a centipede find itself in the grip of a bird or other predator, it can often escape by sacrificing a few legs. The bird is left with a beak full of legs, and the clever centipede makes a fast escape on those that remain. Since centipedes continue to molt as adults, they can usually repair the damage by simply regenerating legs. If you find a centipede with a few legs that are shorter than the others, it’s likely in the process of recovering from a predator attack.”  According to BugGuide, the House Centipede family Scutigeridae has only two genera, and one of them,
Dendrothereua, is found west of the Mississippi River based on BugGuide date.  The other genera contains only the species known commonly as the House Centipede according to BugGuide, so our best guess is that despite the differing coloration, both of your individuals are the common House Centipede,  Scutigera coleoptrata.  Based on BugGuide information:  “Indoors they are likely to be found at all times of the year provided they have warmth and available prey. In the north they will only be found outside during Summer.”  That leads us to speculate that you should not let temperatures get below 40 degrees Fahrenheit if they cannot shelter without freezing.  BugGuide lists the size as “body length to 3 cm (1.2 inches)” but that does not include the long legs.

House Centipede

House Centipede

House Centipede

House Centipede

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Bug
Location: Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
November 23, 2016 9:02 pm
Hi Bugman
I found this Big Bug in my bath tub this morning. My son is an avid wildlife enthusiast so we caught it so the other kids could see it before we release it. i would like to know what it is so we can give the kids info about it.
Signature: Candy

Longicorn: Acanthophorus confinis

Longicorn: Acanthophorus confinis

Dear Candy,
About a week and a half ago we posted an image of a Longicorn from Tanzania that we believe we correctly identified as
Acanthophorus (Tithoes) confinis.  Upon researching that posting, we found an individual offered for sale on Ebay for $450.00, leading us to speculate this must be a rare species.  Your individual is a male, as evidenced by the well developed mandibles.

Hi Daniel
I think that is exactly what it is.  After I caught it and took it to the school for the kids to look at I also posted a picture of it on Simply the Best Bulawayo Notice Board on Facebook and to my surprise about 4 other people said they had also seen them in their homes and yards recently. My specimen will not be gracing Ebay but will be released in the school ground where another one was released a week ago hopefully to go and breed.

Hi Candy,
We are thrilled to hear you will not be profiting from your discovery.  We are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big LA Jumping Spider?
Location: Venice, CA
November 2, 2016 11:36 am
Dear Bugman,
Once again, I call upon you to help me identify a little critter that has terrified my wife. This guy was big, bigger than a quarter, and its orange thorax and black and grayish stripped legs were very distinct and quite beautiful. I assume this is some type of Jumping Spider…maybe originally from Mexico, maybe a male looking for a mater? Any help identifying would be great. You’ll be happy to know that after a conversation with the spider it walked out on its own.
Signature: -Teacher Todd

Johnson's Jumper

Johnson’s Jumper

Dear Teacher Todd,
Our money is on this being Johnson’s Jumper,
Phidippus johnsoni, a species described on BugGuide as being:  “Mostly black with a red abdomen. The male’s abdomen is entirely red, whereas the female’s abdomen has a black mark down the center.”  This BugGuide image is a good match.  Because of your tolerance, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden Silk Spider respite
Location: Charleston, SC
October 18, 2016 5:21 pm
Thought you might enjoy this image. This gal had been residing beside the house for some time when we had an unexpected cold spell. She was pretty lethargic in the web and I thought she might fall prey to a blue jay or something. So, I brought her inside for a couple of days until it warmed back up. She seemed fine when I took her back out, she remade her web and, I think made an egg sack (her abdomen had diminished greatly in size one day not too long after). Here’s to hopes for the next generation.
Signature: Norm Shea

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear Norm,
Your kindness to this Golden Silk Spider definitely deserves the Bug Humanitarian Award.  We hope you have future generations in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination