Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"

Subject:  Freshwater bug
Geographic location of the bug:  East Kootenay, British Columbia
Date: 06/03/2019
Time: 10:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this insect floating in a freshwater lake in late May.
6 legs, approximately 2” long.
Found another smaller specimen the next day.
Suspect type of dragon fly larva but never seen one with these mouth appendages
How you want your letter signed:  David

Water Tiger

Dear David,
This is a Water Tiger, the predatory larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle.  It breathes air through a siphon at the tip of its abdomen which is why you found it floating.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

Water Tiger

Subject:  Water bugs
Geographic location of the bug:  Arkansas
Date: 05/25/2019
Time: 10:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was out cleaning the pool because it hasn’t been cleaned since we moved in and I saw some weird looking bugs. I’ve never seen anything like them and I tried googling it but nothing showed up so you’re my last hope. I’m also very sorry that the pictures aren’t well lit but it’s all I have.
How you want your letter signed:  Chloe

Dragonfly Naiads

Dear Chloe,
These are the aquatic larvae of Dragonflies, commonly called naiads.  They are aquatic predators that will help to naturally control populations of Mosquitoes. 

Subject:  Pool creature?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tennessee
Date: 05/12/2019
Time: 08:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My sister had me come look at her pool over these things eating the tadpole eggs in the filter.
How you want your letter signed:  Kitty

Water Tiger

Dear Kitty,
This is a Water Tiger, the predatory larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle.  These larvae breathe through a siphon at the tip of the abdomen that breaks the surface of the water.

Subject:  Weird worm like creature found in water
Geographic location of the bug:  Petersburg, Tennessee
Date: 04/29/2019
Time: 09:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was going outside catching tadpoles to grow and I can across this worm like thing. I scooped him up and put him in with the tadpoles. Maybe he wasn’t originally in the water and he fell in? But I didn’t want to take the chance. I’ve looked up tons of worm like creatures and even asked my parents to no avail. It would be appreciated greatly if you could help figure this mystery out. Thanks in advance.
How you want your letter signed:  Sierra

Horse Fly Larva

Dear Sierra,
We believe this is a Horse Fly larva.  According to Quora:  “
Most horse flies are associated with water, and the carnivorous larvae can be found therein. I have collected black horse fly larvae while searching through the muck and mud at pond edges. [T]Here’s a Colorado State University photo by Jennifer Bonnell of what is probably a black horse fly larva eating a small frog; they’ll also eat other insects, and, while I’ve never seen it, I’m sure they’ll eat any weakened or trapped minnows they might be able to.  Through the summer, the larvae grow in the water through 6–9 instars, and ultimately spend the winter in the the mud in their last instar. In spring, still in the muck and mire, they pupate and a few weeks later, the adults emerge.”  You might not want to keep this predatory Horse Fly larva with your tadpoles.

Subject:  Elongated bug in old pool water
Geographic location of the bug:  West central Alabama
Date: 04/26/2019
Time: 07:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve began seeing these segmented, elongated bugs for the first time this year (beginning about March, when weather got warm) in the foot of nasty pool water left in our above ground pool. They swim leisurely, but can also dart very quickly.
How you want your letter signed:  Amanda In Alabama

Water Tiger

Dear Amanda in Alabama,
This is a Water Tiger, the aquatic larva of a Predaceous Diving Beetle.  Water Tigers are efficient predators that eat small aquatic insects and invertebrates as well as small fish and tadpoles.  Here is an image from Insects of Alberta.

Water Tiger

Subject:  Unknown “insect” under water
Geographic location of the bug:  Madison county Kentucky USA
Date: 04/05/2019
Time: 01:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found these in a communications manhole. They seem to have 6 legs per side for a total of 12.
How you want your letter signed:  Ian

Isopods

Dear Ian,
These are sure puzzling creatures, and we cannot devote the time we would like to their identification at this moment.  We are posting your images and we hope to hear from our readers while we do additional research.  Are you able to provide any information on their size?

 

Isopods

Update:  We suspected these were Crustaceans.  We wrote to Eric Eaton who wrote back “Some kind of amphipod, not sure beyond that as they are not insects nor arachnids.”  In researching Freshwater Isopods, we found these image of a cave dwelling Isopod on Encyclopedia of Arkansas, and since there are numerous caves in Kentucky, we speculated that it would be easy for some cave species to survive in a sewer.