Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this?
Location: Preston county West virginia
June 30, 2017 5:29 pm
I found this while cleaning my pool. Could you please tell me what it is. The pool was drained to clean leaves at the bottom left from the fall.
Signature: not in my pool

Aquatic Beetle Larva

The best we can do is identify this as the aquatic larva of a Water Beetle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange prehistoric water dweller
Location: Little grass valley reservoir california
July 2, 2017 7:21 pm
This bug was caught chasing my husband as we swam in a lake. It has what looks like feathers along it’s back side and pinchers.
Signature: However

Mayfly Nymph

This is the aquatic nymph or naiad of a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera.  Anglers often devote major portions of websites to insects used as bait, so we found nice images that match yours posted to Fly Fishing God and Trout Nut as well as on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “most nymphs develop in streams and rivers that are well-oxygenated and relatively free of pollution; some species develop in lakes or ponds, usually in shallow water where the oxygen content is highest.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crazy bug
Location: North LOUISIANA
May 30, 2017 1:52 pm
What is this?!
Signature: Amansa

Toe-Biter

Dear Amansa,
This is a Giant Water Bug, sometimes called a Toe-Biter or Electric Light Bug.  It is an aquatic predator that is capable of flying and is frequently attracted to lights.  It should be handled with caution as it is capable of giving a painful bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: NE Pennsylvania l
May 24, 2017 5:26 pm
Is this a giant waterbug? The bug pictured is almost 3in in length.
Regards,
Signature: Mike

Toe-Biter

Dear Mike,
This is indeed a Giant Water Bug, commonly called a Toe-Biter.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Army Green Beetle
Location: Terlingua Ranch, West Texas
May 5, 2017 2:37 pm
We found this guy on top of our water catchment barrel in West Texas, next to Big Bend National Park. He was big enough to fit in a teaspoon, which I used to get him out. He sprang off the spoon with those powerful back legs. He didn’t attempt to fly, but it looks as if it has wings of some sort under that hard exterior. I am certainly curious about this one. We see so many unique insects out there, but this one is a mystery. I love his little eyes….
Yes, I did take this photo and you can use it if you would like.
Thank you for any info you could give.
Signature: Jo

Giant Diving Beetle

Dear Jo,
This is a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the genus Dytiscus, and it is an aquatic species that can also fly from one watery environment to another, so finding it on the water catchment barrel makes perfect sense.  At first we thought it must be the Giant Green Water Beetle,
Dytiscus marginicollis, but that species is only reported from the far west, and according to BugGuide:  “posterior yellow band of pronotum broad especially in the middle” and your individual is lacking that band.  Based on this BugGuide image, we now suspect it might be Dytiscus carolinus, though other images of the species show strong grooves in the elytra.  It is described on BugGuide as being “Abdominal sterna colouration reddish to black and elytra with no yellow subapical transverse fascia.”  But for the coloration, that description does fit.  This FlickR image also resembles your individual.  So though we cannot commit to a species, we are confident that this is a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the genus Dytiscus.  Perhaps mardikavana who frequently writes in with identifications might be able to provide a species identification, however we have a previous comment from mardikavana that states:  “I can’t definitely ID it because when you are dealing with dytiscus sp. you need to see the underside as well. “

Correction:  May 14, 2017
Thanks to a comment from Zach Bruder, we learned this is a Giant Diving Beetle,
Cybister fimbriolatus, and according to BugGuide:  “Similar to Dytiscus, but metatarsal claws different. Elytra and pronotum smooth in male. Dilated male protarsus differs in details from that of Dytiscus. Female Cybister has fine furrows on pronotum.”  Here is a BugGuide image of a greenish individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: blood worms
Location: Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 1, 2017 9:18 pm
Though it might make us unpopular with the neighbors, we keep standing water in the yard for wildlife, and we skim with a net daily to feed Mosquito Larvae to the Angelfish, and Boris is still thriving alone in his tank since killing Medea Luna several years ago.  This week the Mosquito Larvae have been replaced by Blood Worms, the larvae of non-biting Midges, and Boris has been greedily eating everyone put in the tank.

Blood Worms

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination