Currently viewing the tag: "Aquatic Bugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Frozen Like Han Solo
Geographic location of the bug:  a pond in northern IL
Date: 12/10/2018
Time: 11:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi.  We were hiking in the woods and saw a few of these trapped in the ice of two different shallow ponds near our home.  Each specimen was about 2 to 2.5 inches long.  I thought it must be a larvae of a pond insect, but I haven’t been able to find any that are supposed to be that big.  Any ideas?
How you want your letter signed:  Mary

Horse Fly Larva

Dear Mary,
This looks to us like the larva of a Horse Fly.  There is a matching image on Quora where it states:  “Most horse flies are associated with water, and the carnivorous larvae can be found therein.”

Thank you! and Yuck!
I appreciate your help.  I always attempt to do my own identifying, but whenever I am stuck, you always come through.
My curiosity thanks you.
Mary
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  very large bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, Mexico
Date: 09/10/2018
Time: 10:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My wife found this 9-10 cm big bug in an arroyo 2 days ago and we wanted to know what it is because my brother-in-law claims that it is very poisonous. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Michael Patrick

Toe-Biter

Dear Michael,
This is a Giant Water Bug in the family Belostomatidae and there are similar looking individuals found all over the world.  Commonly called Toe-Biters in North America because of the painful bite they are able to inflict on bathers and waders in freshwater bodies of water, Giant Water Bugs are not considered poisonous, however, they do inject saliva that can cause a reaction in some people.  According to Research Gate:  “These insects have toxic saliva capable of provoking intense pain and paralysis in vertebrates. Victims experienced intense, excruciating pain and 1 manifested hypoesthesia in the forearm. Bites by Belostomatidae are often reported by clinicians working in areas where these insects live, but there are no detailed case reports in the medical literature. ”  According to Pest Wiki:  “Water bugs are referred to as Toe biters because they do bite.Water bugs are harmless to humans.They don’t seek for people to go and bite them up.Water bugs bite is considered to be most harmful and painful.They bite on rare occasions when we get scared, or they get terrified. Usually, there are initial symptoms, but rarely they may cause life-threatening allergic reactions.”

Wow that was a very complete and useful description! Thank you so much.
I will recommend your website to everyone!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  odd creature found in Thailand
Geographic location of the bug:  Bangkok suburbs, Thailand
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 12:45 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This thing was in a swimming pool. Didn’t look to be struggling. I took it out and it sat on the side of the pool. I took some photos and a few minutes later I couldn’t find it. As you can see it has 4 legs, no wings, two large eyes and quite a long tail.
How you want your letter signed:  Alex Slater

Water Scorpion

Dear Alex,
This is a predatory Water Scorpion, and the common name is a reference to its painful bite.  Water Scorpions are also capable of flying.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this thing??
Geographic location of the bug:  Around the centralia missouri area
Date: 08/18/2018
Time: 09:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy pulled into my work and this bug was in the back of his truck back in July.  He said he had been working out in the woods but never said where. If you could find out what this is, I’d be very interested in know. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  The Eagle Stop Karaoke Girl

Toe-Biter

Dear Eagle Stop Karaoke Girl,
This is a Giant Water Bug or Toe-Biter in the family Belostomatidae, and based on this BugGuide image, it might be the Eastern Toe-Biter,
Benacus griseus.

So it was supposed to say centralia not entralia XD Thank you so much!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Wilmington, NC
Date: 08/08/2018
Time: 01:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this in my ditch after a bunch of rainfall. We have had standing water for 2 weeks.  It has 6 legs near its head.
How you want your letter signed:  Wendy Pendill

Water Tiger

Dear Wendy,
This looks to us like a Water Tiger, the larva of a Giant Water Scavenger Beetle, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae often predatory.”   Here is a nice BugGuide posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bugs swarming at night
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Iowa
Date: 08/08/2018
Time: 08:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi bug man, we live on a farm in central Iowa. The following bug has been swarming our lights at night and leaving heaping piles of dead bugs on the ground in the morning. What are these things?!
How you want your letter signed:  Becky H

Plague of Water Boatmen

Goodness Gracious Becky.
You have a plague of biblical proportions on your hands.  Even after cropping your image to a vertical, there appears to be hundreds of thousands of Water Boatmen present.  These are Water Boatmen in the family Corixidae, and your individuals look like the one in this BugGuide image from the genus
Trichocorixa.  Your submission is definite proof of the BugGuide claim:  “Adults fly to lights, sometimes in great numbers.”  Water Boatmen are aquatic True Bugs and according to BugGuide:  “Common in ponds. Also found in birdbaths. A few species live in streams, and others are found in brackish pools along the seashore above the high tidemark.”  Their food is listed as: “Algae, detritus, other aquatic organisms (mosquito larvae, brine shrimp).”  If this is the first time you have ever experienced this situation, we can only conclude that for some reason, conditions are ripe for a population explosion.  Perhaps fertilizer runoff to a nearby pond is causing an algae bloom, providing a food source for millions of Water Boatmen.  Since they can also fly, if a pond dries out, the Water Boatmen can migrate to another aquatic habitat.

Water Boatmen

Thank you for the information!  I told my husband they looked like the water bugs in our 1.4 acre pond that is right by our house!  We also live 1/4 mile from whitebreast creek.  I’m going to attach a video from this morning… biblical proportions is right!

Thanks again,
Becky
IMG_7044

Water Boatman

Thanks Becky,
We don’t load many videos to our site, but yours is quite amazing and tells the story way better than the still image.  Glad we could assist in the ID.  Hopefully this situation will not last very much longer.

Awesome, thank you so much!
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination