Subject:  Pink Glowworm Sighting
Geographic location of the bug:  Julian, CA 93036
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 12:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  First time seeing this bug. June 11, 2019 at 4,200 altitude
How you want your letter signed:  Dianna Hess

Pink Glowworm

Dear Dianna,
Thanks so much for sending in your awesome images of a Pink Glowworm,
Microphotus angustus, both illuminated and illuminating.  The Pink Glowworm is actually a Firefly.

Pink Glowworm Glowing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What am I?
Geographic location of the bug:  Andover Township, NJ
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 06:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Daniel,
Hoping you can id this interesting little insect.  It looks to me like some type of planthopper maybe, although I’ve never seen one in my garden before today.  Length approximately 1/2 inch and it wasn’t moving much.  I plucked the flower it was on to get some better shots, expecting that it might fly, but it just stayed in place.  Hope these shots are enough to identify it.
How you want your letter signed:  Deborah E Bifulco

Speckled Sharpshooter

Hi Deborah,
You are correct that this is a Planthopper, more specifically, a Sharpshooter.  Planthoppers are insects that feed by sucking fluids from plants, and some species are known to spread viruses to plants, so they are generally not too welcome in the garden.  We quickly identified your Speckled Sharpshooter,
Paraulacizes irrorata, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide food plants include:  “Asteraceae: Cirsium altissimum (tall thistle), Cirsium sp., Conyza canadensis (horseweed), Lactuca serriola (prickly lettuce), Silphium integrifolium (wholeleaf rosinweed); Poaceae: Elymus virginicus (Virginia wild rye), Sorghum sp. (cultivated sorghum).”

Speckled Sharpshooter

Thank you for the quick id!  I never mind having planthoppers in my garden, so he/she is welcome to hang out.

Subject:  Some kind of wasp?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Palm Springs, CA
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 08:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I’m wondering if this is some kind of Wasp? Perhaps a bee ?‍♀️ I found it inside my house. But haven’t been able to identify what it is. Seems like the butt is skinnier than most wasps & it’s about an inch long. Moves very quick too. Definetly has a stinger. Also I did free it from the bag after I took pics. (The second photo is of its under body)
How you want your letter signed:  Alyssa

Thynnid Wasp

Dear Alyssa,
This appears to be what in the past we have classified as a Tiphiid Wasp in the genus
Myzimun, but there has apparently been some reclassification of the genus.  Now the genus Myzimun is classified in the family Thynnidae according to BugGuide.  This is a male Wasp and male Wasps are not able to sting.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are parasitoids of white grubs (scarab larvae), especially Phyllophaga and other Scarabaeidae, and to a lesser extent Cicindelinae. Adults take nectar, mostly from Asteraceae and Apiaceae” and “Used in turfgrass pest management.”  Because of your submission, Daniel is going to have to do some reclassification in the archives and move many formerly identified Tiphiid Wasps into a new family category Thynnid Wasps.

Thynnid Wasp

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Super Close ups of Robber Fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Ellijay, GA
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 08:23 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My son excitedly for this guy and we Scored some great shots of this guy June 10, 2019.  He didn’t seem to mind that I was interrupting his dinner. Would love to know the species.
Enjoy!
How you want your letter signed:  Melissa

Beelike Robber Fly eats Japanese Beetle

Dear Melissa,
Your son’s images are wonderful and an excellent addition to our Food Chain tag.  This is a Beelike Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, and it is feeding on an invasive, exotic Japanese Beetle, the scourge of many gardeners.  Because of the yellow hairs on the abdomen and legs, and because of your location, we believe this is Laphria macquarti based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Seems to prefer small beetles, but would eat other insects, even other robber flies” which further supports our tentative identification.

Beelike Robber Fly eats Japanese Beetle

Subject:  Beetle identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwest Arkansas
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 06:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this drawing in my skin after feeling a sting.
I think it came from the yard or garden. It’s very small. Maybe 2mm. Smaller or similar size as an ant.
How you want your letter signed:  Allergic to everything

Thrips, possibly

Dear Allergic to everything,
Because of its small size and general shape, we believe this might be a Thrips.  Here is an image from BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Thrips can often be found on flowers, they are especially visible on light colored flowers like daisies. Be aware that though they are very tiny, they can give a slightly painful bite.”

Subject:  Blue legs?
Geographic location of the bug:  Chattanooga TN Riverwalk Park
Date: 06/11/2019
Time: 09:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Looks super cool and walks kinda like a praying mantis caught the pic while it was eating lunch. Making sure it’s not dangerous as it is by a playground
How you want your letter signed:  Rosh

Wheel Bug Nymph

Dear Rosh,
This is a Wheel Bug nymph, and like many Assassin Bugs, it might bite if carelessly handled, but unlike some Assassin Bugs, namely the Kissing Bugs, the bite of a Wheel Bug, though painful, is not considered dangerous.