Subject:  Photos of Desert Spider Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Albuquerque New Mexico
Date: 06/13/2019
Time: 10:58 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just wanted to share these good images of the Desert Spider Beetle.
How you want your letter signed:  Chris Krupar

Desert Spider Beetle

Dear Chris,
Thanks for submitting your images of a Desert Spider Beetle.  According to BugGuide, the species found in New Mexico is
Cysteodemus wislizeni.

Desert Spider Beetle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Garden pest?
Geographic location of the bug:  Belgrade, Maine
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 07:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw these tiny little perfect holes in my newly seeded beet bed and carefully excavated with a small twig, maintaining the integrity of the hole; when I got to about 5-6 cm. down this “scary” beast jumped up and attacked the stick! It’s about 1.5 cm long. Could this be what made for an unsuccessful beet bed last year?
How you want your letter signed:  Mary

Tiger Beetle Larva

Not at all Mary.  This is a beneficial, predatory Tiger Beetle larva.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  

Thank you! So wonderful- I was hoping it was one of the ground beetles! Not being sure, I set it free behind my house far from vegie garden, in my wildflower garden! Now I will know for sure and  will leave them be. This is the first year I haven’t rototilled, hoping to encourage beneficials.

Subject:  A nymph of some kind?
Geographic location of the bug:  Sappemeer, Netherlands
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 08:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
This looks to be a nymph of some kind. But I have no clue what it is. At first I thought it was a ladybug nymph until I saw the picture enlarged on my computer. This was taken just a couple days ago, on June 10, 2019.
How you want your letter signed:  Lizzie

Aphid Wolf

Dear Lizzie,
This is a beneficial Lacewing larva, sometimes called an Aphid Wolf after its preferred prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  South Central Wisconsin
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 02:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
We have found TWO of these bugs in our home in the last 12 hours. We live in a small city, but our house is at the end of a street adjacent to farm fields. Given the amount of rain we have had this spring, there is standing water in some areas of the fields not far from our house. I have never seen any of these bugs before that I know of, but especially not in our house. Last night’s sighting including the bug crawling up from the inside of a new reclining chair!
How you want your letter signed:  K

Midwestern Salmonfly

Dear K,
This is a Giant Stonefly or Salmonfly in the genus
Pteronarcys.  Based on your location, we are surmising this is a Midwestern Salmonfly, Pteronarcys pictetii, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Subject:  Can someone ID this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Pennsylvania
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 12:42 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found one in a bedroom closet, and another on my patio. Please help! I need to know what this is.
How you want your letter signed:  Samantha

Stonefly

Dear Samantha,
Do you live near a body of water?  This is a Stonefly, an insect with an aquatic larval form.  It is harmless.  We surmise it accidentally found its way into your closet.  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.

Stonefly

Hello!
Yes, we have a small stream running through our property. I am glad to know what this is, as I was terrified it was a roach. Thank you for your quick response as well.
Samantha

Subject: Unknown caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Roaring springs, TX
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 02:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this Caterpillar on a herping trip and have been having trouble identifying it. It was found in early morning around 8:45am on the 1st of June. Not sure what plant it was on though. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Lisa

Hooded Owlet Caterpillar

Dear Lisa,
This is one of the Hooded Owlet Moth Caterpillars in the genus
Cucullia.  We believe we have correctly identified it as Cucullia laetifica, thanks to BugGuide images and data on the range which includes Texas.