Subject:  Moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  North GA
Date: 06/12/2019
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug was outside on our window screen. We can’t recall seeing one before, and we’ve been unable to identify.
How you want your letter signed:  Bragg7

Female Dobsonfly

Dear Bragg7,
Moths that feed as adults have a sucking proboscis for a mouth.  Your critter has impressive mandibles.  This is a female Dobsonfly, one of our most common identification requests during summer months.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Never seen this bug before
Geographic location of the bug:  Knoxville, TN
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 11:21 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought this bug looked cool and was trying to identify it! Found it on the bed in my house.
How you want your letter signed:  Jessie

Doodlebug

Dear Jessie,
This is an Antlion larva, commonly called a Doodlebug.  They are generally found at the bottom of a pit in sandy soil where they lie buried with only their impressive mandibles exposed, waiting for unsuspecting prey, often Ants, to fall into the pit right into the hungry Doodlebug’s waiting jaws.  Interestingly, we just posted an image of an unknown larva that the querent mistook for an Antlion larva.

Subject:  Extinct trilobite found!
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma
Date: 06/12/2019
Time: 04:58 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this out by our pool. I realize it’s not really a trilobite, but it looks like one. Maybe an ant lion?
How you want your letter signed:  Gage

Owlfly Larva

Dear Gage,
We believe this is a Beetle larva, and we also believe we might have a similar image in our archives, but we cannot remember its identity.  Daniel is currently in Ohio, using pirated and very slow internet connections, and research is time consuming.  We are posting your marvelous submission as Unidentified and we hope our readership will come to our rescue and provide comments as to its identity.
  We would not rule out that it might be some species of Woodlouse (see BugGuide).  Can you perhaps provide an image of the ventral surface or tell us how many legs it has?

Update:  Owlfly Larva
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we researched Owlfly larvae on BugGuide and located this matching image.  Mystery solved.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Mobile, AL
Date: 06/13/2019
Time: 07:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Any idea what this is?   Found on a lemon tree
How you want your letter signed:  Laura

Orange Dog

Dear Laura,
This is the Caterpillar of a Giant Swallowtail, commonly called an Orange Dog.  It will eat some leaves, but it will not negatively affect the health of your tree.  Unless there are hundreds of them or the tree is very very small, the tree can stand to lose a few leaves.

Subject:  Grasshopper, Katydid, or something else?
Geographic location of the bug:  Austin, Texas
Date: 06/13/2019
Time: 03:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We hail from the northeast and have found that everything is bigger in Texas when it comes to insects!  This one didn’t jump or fly when we approached but lazily stretched one leg at a time almost as if exercising. My youngest was concerned when we found a brown version with large “stinger” but his brother though it to be an ovipositor.
How you want your letter signed:  The Meroff family

Katydid Nymph

Dear Meroff family,
This is an immature Katydid, but we are not certain of the species.  The fact that it is a nymph means it has not finished growing.  Your son is correct about the “stinger” actually being a harmless ovipositor.

Subject:  Whats this bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Pennsylvania
Date: 06/13/2019
Time: 09:42 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can u help me identify this bug on a ash tree
How you want your letter signed:  Ryan

Red Flat Bark Beetle

Dear Ryan,
This is a beneficial Red Flat Bark Beetle, and according to BugGuide the habitat is “under loose bark of deciduous trees” and they eat “presumably predaceous on other arthropods.”