Subject:  moth?
Geographic location of the bug:  indiana USA
Date: 11/06/2018
Time: 04:00 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this dead moth in my garage. it’s big and beautiful. I am pretty sure it’s a luna moth however this one is all white and not green like the photos I’ve seen on the internet…. So the question is …. is it really a luna moth or does it turn white when it’s dead and dried up?
How you want your letter signed:  dszig

Luna Moth

Dear dszig,
There is much variation in the color of a Luna Moth.  Some individuals are very green while others are quite pale.  Mounted Luna Moths in collections are often quite faded, and we suspect light might cause the coloration to fade.  A faded Luna Moth is pictured on the Manitoba Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beatle identification
Geographic location of the bug:  On my dying pine tree in wpb fl
Date: 11/06/2018
Time: 05:05 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this the southern pine bark beetle that is killing my trees just it’s adult form ?
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you Susan

Cicada Exuvia

Dear Susan,
This is the shed exoskeleton or exuvia of a Cicada.  The Cicada nymph lives underground for several years (as long as 17 years for the Periodical Cicada) and then digs to the surface where it molts, emerging as adult winged Cicada and leaving behind the exuvia.

Subject:  Really weird and really scared
Geographic location of the bug:  sherman, texas
Date: 11/07/2018
Time: 08:30 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This thing landed on my arm in my office and i have no idea what it is. I didn’t feel any bite, all I felt was it land on my arm, and i brushed it off immediately. I just need it identified to know if I’m in danger of a parasite, infection, virus or otherwise transmittable illness. It has what I can only assume to be some form of proboscis and an empty white container on its “abdomen” with a grey/black and brown color and a somewhat fuzzy appearance. It also had a triangle-like shape when viewed top down.
How you want your letter signed:  Gerald

Acorn Weevil

Dear Gerald,
This appears to be a very dead Acorn Weevil or Nut Weevil.  You need not fear “danger of a parasite, infection, virus or otherwise transmittable illness” from a harmless Acorn Weevil.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Unknown chrysalis
Geographic location of the bug:  Columbus, Ohio
Date: 11/02/2018
Time: 04:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  So, saw this chrysalis on the outside of a building.  No clue who made it.
How you want your letter signed:  Amber

Swallowtail Chrysalis

Dear Amber,
Most butterflies have a chrysalis that hangs downward from the tip of the abdomen from a silken button spun by the caterpillar, but most Swallowtail caterpillars have an upright chrysalis that is also supported by a silken girdle.  Your chrysalis looks like a Swallowtail Butterfly chrysalis, but we are not certain of the species.

Subject:  What are these caterpillars
Geographic location of the bug:  Selma, texas
Date: 11/02/2018
Time: 05:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found these caterpillars on a potted plant I had.  They have eaten almost all the leaves that I can’t remember what kind of plant it was.  I’m almost sure it was an Impatien.   I think they’re the same caterpillar but not sure.  What are they?
How you want your letter signed:  Delia

Tersa Sphinx Caterpillars

Dear Delia,
These appear to be the caterpillars of the Tersa Sphinx, which occurs in both green and brown forms.  Are you sure the plant was
Impatiens?  A preferred food plant for the Tersa Sphinx is Pentas, according to Sphingidae of the Americas.

Tersa Sphinx Caterpillar

Daniel,  thank you for your quick response.  You’re correct,  these were Pentas.  I just couldn’t remember what kind of plant it was
Delia

Subject:  Huge flying bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Tennessee
Date: 11/02/2018
Time: 03:25 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What the heck is this thing? My parents were on a bus trip to Tennessee and this huge thing flew by- the only noise was the beating of its wings which reminded them of a hummingbird’s wings because it hovered.
How you want your letter signed:  tay2247

Hover Fly

Dear tay2247.
This looks to us like a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, possibly a Yellow Jacket Hover Fly, commonly called a Good News Bee.  They are harmless.

Thank you- I was leaning towards that- it just seemed bigger than what the descriptions said.