Subject:  Crane fly? Wasp?
Geographic location of the bug:  Pittsburgh, PA
Date: 10/03/2018
Time: 11:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Thought it was a crane fly, but most images I could find did not show crane fly with curled antennae.
How you want your letter signed:  Stacy

Ichneumon

Dear Stacy,
This is an Ichneumon, a parasitoid wasp, not a Crane Fly.  We suspect that many reported Crane Fly stings are actually from Ichneumons.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Granada Hills (Los Angeles) CA
Date: 10/03/2018
Time: 02:22 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Would like to know what this bug is and should I worry?
How you want your letter signed:  Helaine

Unknown Longhorned Borer Beetle

Dear Helaine,
This is a Longhorned Borer Beetle in the family Cerambycidae, and it looks like the same species Daniel frequently sees at the porch light, but he has not yet identified the species.  Now that your request has arrived, Daniel will spend more time researching its identity.  Based on this BugGuide image, it might be
Paranoplium gracile.  The images of the species on Cerambycidae Catalog appear very different, and look much smaller than the species Daniel has seen.  The species Daniel has seen looks more like Haplidus testaceus which is also pictured on BugGuide.  It is also pictured on Cerambycidae Catalog.

Subject:  Lime Hawk Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Just outside Philadelphia
Date: 10/02/2018
Time: 09:49 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We found this moth on our garage today. We looked it up and we think it might be a Lime Hawk Moth but they are not from Pennsylvania so we’re not sure how it got here. We live just outside Philadelphia.
How you want your letter signed:  Leslie

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Leslie,
This is a Pandorus Sphinx, a native species for you, not a European Lime Hawk Moth.  Many years ago, we posted an image of a Lime Hawk Moth found in Pennsylvania, but that appears to have been an isolated sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Good News Bee!
Geographic location of the bug:  Smithville, Tennessee
Date: 10/02/2018
Time: 11:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey Daniel, your site allowed me to identify this great bug as a Good News Bee!  Loved the story about it.  Thought you might enjoy this great picture.
How you want your letter signed:  James Davison

Good News Bee

Dear James,
Your image of a Yellowjacket Hover Fly or Good News Bee is a wonderful addition to our archives.

Subject:  What kind of butterfly is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Taylors SC (Upstate SC)
Date: 10/02/2018
Time: 01:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this a type of Gulf Fritillary butterfly? We have about 25 chrysalis hanging on the back of our house. This one (2nd pic) hasn’t opened it’s wings yet, but I didn’t see any orange underneath, like the pictures I found online.
Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Tina C

Newly Emerged Gulf Fritillary

Dear Tina,
We love your image of the wall with various stages of development of Gulf Fritillaries.  Your close-ups are of a pre-pupal Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar and a newly eclosed adult Gulf Fritillary.  The dorsal surface of its wings are orange.  You must have a passion flower vine nearby.

Gulf Fritillaries: Stages of Metamorphosis

Pre-Pupal Gulf Fritillary Caterpillar

Subject:  Bug identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Klipheuwel, Cape Town, South Africa
Date: 10/01/2018
Time: 06:52 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I photographed this insect at a wetland in Klipheuwel, near Cape Town.  It is an agricultural area. Farming practices include wheat, oats and live stock farming (cattle and sheep).
How you want your letter signed:  Tania Morkel

Yellow Dung Fly

Dear Tania,
It is a Fly, order Diptera. Not sure of family.  We need more time to research.

Yellow Dung Fly

Many thanks Daniel
An entomologist from my University just confirmed that it is Scathophaga stercoraria (Yellow dung fly).
Kind regards
Tania Morkel
Hi again Tania,
Thanks for getting back to us with a correct identification.  We found images of the Yellow Dung Fly on Wildlife Insight, but we also found the species, with the common name Golden Dung Fly, on BugGuide, a North American site, where it states the range is “throughout North America and the world.”