Subject:  Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Howick kzn
Date: 04/10/2018
Time: 08:50 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Attached are two pics.  The one of a little creature which seems to be invading the garden at the moment …. looks like a kind of shongulolo (spell) because it curls ina little ball and poos on your hand …. we are not killing them but just interested where they might be coming from and what they are?   Second pic of a caterpillar we found walking the dogs… was under a plane tree and unfortunately many of them had been squashed in the road… quite sad … such lovely colors but wandering which butterfly\moth they might be… thanks very much xxxx
How you want your letter signed:  Elizabeth

Emperor Moth Caterpillar: Nudaurelia wahlbergi

Dear Elizabeth,
This is an Emperor Moth Caterpillar,
Nudaurelia wahlbergi.  The adult moth is pictured on African Moths, and information on the caterpillar can be found on Silkmoths and More.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Large florida beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Florida
Date: 04/09/2018
Time: 02:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello! I found this considerable large shell of a dung(?) beetle outside my home in St. Petersburg, Florida. I kept the dried-up thing for a while and i came across your site and i wanted to find out what kind of beetle this is at last. It has very small horn right above it’s head, and that makes me think it is a female dung beetle. Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Chance Arceneaux

Female Ox Beetle

Dear Chance,
This is a female Ox Beetle in the genus
Strategus, most likely Strategus antaeus, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Typically sandy areas, e.g. coastal plains” and “Adults said to be chafers, feeding on grasses, leaves, fruits.”

Female Ox Beetle

Subject:  Tomato caterpillars
Geographic location of the bug:  St. Elizabeth, Jamaica
Date: 04/09/2018
Time: 09:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Bugman!
I’ve  been enjoying your website for years  and I am now excited to submit my first question! I am a Peace Corps volunteer serving in Jamaica and my host father is growing some of the most beautiful tomatoes in the entire world. However there is an aggressive caterpillar pest Wreaking havoc on his produce. I am trying to encourage less toxic methods to deal with such pests in the community and I was hoping that you could identify the species of caterpillar for me in order to create a more targeted management method. Thank you so much for your help and keep up the good work!
How you want your letter signed:  Farming PCV

Cutworm

Dear Farming PCV,
This is some species of Cutworm in the family Noctuidae, and many caterpillars in the family look very similar.  Our internet search did turn up images on Minden Pictures of the Caterpillar of the Large Yellow Underwing,
Noctua pronuba, feeding on the leaves of a tomato plant, and BugGuide states “Larvae feed on a variety of crops and vegetables, plus grasses”, but even though we see a similarity, we do not believe that is your species.  We found an image on Colourbox that is identified as a Turnip Moth cutworm, Agrotis segetum, eating a tomato, and it resembles your culprit, but other images of this caterpillar we located on the internet are brown and we cannot confirm that identification either.  Both species we have mentioned are Old World species, but the Large Yellow Underwing has been introduced to North America.  We found additional images of brown Cutworms eating tomatoes on Dreamstime and then we believe we found your culprit on Alamy where it is identified as a “Bright-line Brown-eye moth, also known as tomato moth (Lacanobia oleracea).”  According to UK Moths: “Favouring suburban habitats as well as salt-marshes, the larval foodplants in the wild are usually orache (Atriplex) and goosefoot (Chenopodium), but it can sometimes attack cultivated tomatoes, feeding internally in the fruit.”  Wikipedia does not list Jamaica nor any other New World location, but that does not mean the species has not been introduced.  It might just be undocumented at this time.  Wildlife Insight offers the following advice:  “To prevent the adult moths from laying eggs on the plants some fine mesh should be placed over the greenhouse windows between May and August. Doors left open during the day to allow bees to enter should be netted off if left open at night.  If growing tomatoes outdoors then the whole plant will have be cloaked in netting.  Any clusters of eggs are usually easy to find on the underside of the leaves and can then be scrapped off.  At the first sign of fenestrations appearing in tomato leaves check the undersides for the tiny caterpillars.  The location of the feeding caterpillars is often given away by fine dark freckling of frass on the leaves directly beneath those being eaten.”

Cutworm

Thank you so very much for your assistance!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Longhorned  Borer Beetle
Geographic location of the bug:  Galapagos Islands, Isla San Cristobal
Date: 04/08/2018
Time: 01:02 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this longhorned borer beetle at my hotel on Isla San Cristobal. I was just wondering what the exact type it is, since there are so many different kinds of beetle.
How you want your letter signed:  Kristopher Olson

Longicorn

Dear Kristopher,
This beetle is indeed a Longicorn in the family Cerambycidae, but a straight on dorsal view is ideal for identification purposes and your images are taken from an angle.  Your individual greatly resembles the Ivory Marked Beetle
Eburia quadrigeminata, found in North America, and as we were searching the internet to identify your individual, we believe we located it on A Photographic Catalog of the Cerambycidae of the World, and it appears to be Eburia lanigera lanigera, a member of the same genus as the North American Ivory Marked Beetle.

Longicorn

Subject:  Stripey black and white Grasshopper?
Geographic location of the bug:  Bullsbrook area, Perth, Western Australia
Date: 04/07/2018
Time: 01:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I found this cute looking little guy in my front yard and I cant seem to identify him.  Thank you for helping.
How you want your letter signed:  Taylah

Grasshopper

Dear Taylah,
We have not had any luck providing you with a species identification.  We could not locate any similar looking Grasshoppers on the Esperance Fauna page nor on the Brisbane Insect site.  The bulbous eyes on your individual are quite distinctive. 

Grasshopper

Subject:  Audrey
Geographic location of the bug:  Northwest ohio
Date: 04/06/2018
Time: 06:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey I found this in my bearded dragon tank and can’t figure out what it is
How you want your letter signed:  Audrey

Bed Bug Nymph

Dear Audrey,
This sure looks to us like a Bed Bug nymph, and you can compare your individual to this BugGuide image.  This is quite puzzling for us.  According to BugGuide, the members of the Bed Bug family are “ectoparasites of birds and mammals; most are associated with birds & bats, only 2 spp. (
Cimex lectularius and C. hemipterus) are permanently associated with humans.”   According to the U.S. Government Environmental Protection Agency site:  “Young bed bugs (also called nymphs), in general, are: smaller, translucent or whitish-yellow in color; and if not recently fed, can be nearly invisible to the naked eye because of coloring and size.”  Your individual appears to have recently fed, presumable from the blood of your Bearded Dragon.  We would also wonder why a single Bed Bug nymph appeared suddenly in your reptile tank leading us to speculate if it was bred in your home or if it was recently transported to the tank from something you got at the pet store.  We imagine mammals and birds sold at pet stores might become prey to Bed Bugs and kin in the family Cimicidae.  BeardedDragon.org contains a Q&A forum posting regarding bearded dragons and bed bugs, but no definitive answer is provided.