Amazing. I have searched the web for a few days, identify a bug sites, all kinds of crazy stuff. Nothing. No where. I email you and you instantly know what it is. I attached the pictures of the one specimin I photographed closely. I googled up a bunch of photos. But the photos I have seen of live ones and what not, if there are no very close relatives, that is it.
You said they are European imports. So they are already across the United States? They are in Salt Lake City anyway. A little more reading on them, they say they raise up like a scorpion when scared, release a stinky smell from their abdomen (true) does not sting but can give a painful bite. We are not gardeners, we live in brand new apartments, and we are finding them in our house. Should something be done? Or should we just scoop them up and let them outside? Thanks again on identifying it, with such a vague description really. Best site 🙂
google.com search identify a font.
The site, identifies fonts, asks one question at a time, and identifies the font, to 2 or three fonts out of like 10,000 fonts. A bug site like that, would be amazing. I’m not much of a bug expert, but if you wanted any design help for such a site, let me know.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hello!
I have a lot of green flies that live in the ground. They have many holes , in the sand of my flagstone path, that they go in and out of of the holes all day, more so in the morning. They have bright green bodies, it looks like they are collecting pollen because some have a lot of yellow powder on there back legs. They are not causing any problems they are actually really fun to watch I just wanted to know what they are doing in there underground world.
Thanks !
Lesha Bertolucci
Petaluma, CA

Dear Lesha,
Metallic Sweat Bees Agapostemon and Augochlorella species, have bright, usually green bodies and nest in the ground, digging tubular burrows. they are called Sweat Bees since they are often attracted by human perspiration. They do pollinate flowers.

Dear Mr. Marlos,
Do you have any secret tips or tricks for repelling aphids? They have completely colonized my cucumber patch, and look like they’re headed for the corn or beans next. I’ve tried organic "safer soap" and lady bugs, but these nasty bugs are BADASS. hould I cut my losses and rip out the cucumbers for the safety of the rest of the garden?
Infested in Silverlake

Dear Infested,
Try a garden hose directly on the affected areas. The aphids will wash off with the water jet and die without a food source. Diligence is important as winged adults can always return, but the nymphs are goners.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dear What’s that Bug,
The ants which have invaded my boyfriend’s apartment have a special love for my panties. Every morning, I find that the previous day’s pair has been invaded by an army of panty-crazy ants. I know that it is most likely the delightful scent I impart to this intimate clothing which attracts these lustful insects, but I find the whole situation to be a bit distasteful. Is there anything I can do to keep the anties away from my panties?
Yours,
Ant Bait
Dear Sugar Snatch,
I don’t think you want to resort to spraying your panties with Raid™ or some other insecticide, and I also don’t think your boyfriend would appreciate you changing your delightful personal aroma. I think the solution is to pick up after yourself and not leave your panties strewn about the floor where the ants can find them. You can also try washing them by hand and hanging them to dry so that you have a fresh pair of panties after your sleep-over.

Help! I have just found your website which I hope will be my saviour. I have a wee problem here in my flat in Edinburgh. This "problem" is a brown creepy crawly thing which seems to like catfood. Whenever I put the catfood back down on the floor for the cats these things seem to put in an appearance. They seem to be more nocturnal, appearing after dark, so that I find them only when I go into the kitchen at night – and there they are hoovering up the cat food that the messy little eaters have spilt on the floor (cats have no table manners!). There are loads of them and despite me cleaning the floor with bleach several times a week, they reappear with annoying regularity.
They are brown on top and whitish underneathand appear to be ridged making them look a bit maggoty. They have legs and can be various sizes – up to 2cm long. What are these things and more importantly how do I get rid of them. They must be "nesting" under the floorboards as there is nowhere else they can be coming from. I have tried moving the cats food to other parts of the kitchen but they always seem to find it. URGH!!! I am at my wits end and would like to get rid of these things before the poor cats go mad trying to work out where I have decided to put their food this time. I don’t think they enjoy this game very much! Your help and advice on how to eradicate these pests from my home PERMANENTLY would be hugely appreciated.
—Lesley

Dear Lesley,
From the time mankind has lived in caves, we have been annoyed by household pests. In his usual charming manner, Hogue writes in his chapter on household pests: "Unwelcome guests within our homes, stealing our food and wrecking our possessions, and sometimes repaying us with bites and stings–these are the insect pests. … A need for shelter, food, or a nesting place, attraction to lights, or perhaps the enticement of shade and food odors–and not a conscious desire to bother us–bring these guests to our door. In spite of screening, entry is easy for most insects: their small size permits them to squeeze through small cracks in the flooring, around baseboards, and under doors and through other imperfections in construction."
With that said Lesley, no matter what you do, you will have household intruders. Regarding the identification of your brown creepy crawly thing, I suspect pill bugs or sow bugs. They are not true insects, but rather members of the order Isopoda and the subphylum Crustacea. Pill bugs are so called because of their habit of rolling into a little ball. Sow bugs are generally larger and cannot roll themselves up into a ball. Sow bug can grow as large as 15mm. They are nocturnal, omniverous and can be very numerous, sometimes experiencing population explosions. They are generally found outdoors in the garden, but they will take refuge inside the home, especially when it is dry. I would guess that you feed your cats near a water source, and a leaking pipe with the resulting rotting wood, could well be the reason the ispods have taken up quarters in your flat. Because of their distasteful secretions, these isopods are eaten by few predators. A notable exception is the sow bug killer, a dysderid spider, Dysdera crocota.

Dear WTB,
I encountered a different looking bug this morning, and have been trying to search the net for pictures, but have been unsuccessful, and was hoping you could help. The body of the spider was an oval-oblong shape and beige, or tan in color, and the head was small and red and the legs appeared to be coming out in between the head and body and they were also red in color. I thought it a little strange that the legs were not spread out along the body. I live in the Denver Co. area, if that helps. Any photos would be great too.
Thanks
K

Dear K,
That is the second letter today with the same spider. The other was from the UK. You saw a Sow Bug Killer, Dysdera crocota. They are one of the few predators that will eat sow bugs which have an unleasant taste. They sometimes bite people, but the bite is not serious. They are beneficial.

Thank you for your reply. Would you happen to have a photo of the sow bug
killer? I have tried looking for one, but cannot find one.
Thank You
K

Hi K,
I’ve enclosed the photo. Let us know if that was your spider.

Daniel,
Sorry for the delay.
That is the spider.
Thanks for your help.