3 pics
Hi! I’m in Florida and I have 3 pictures I have questions about. One is of a large dragonfly with something near the end of its tail. What is it?… And last, but not least…..I think you know what I’m going to ask :0) Thanks!
Jaime

So Jaime,
Your big dragonfly is a Twelve-Spot Skimmer, Libellula pulchella, but the object on its abdomen is not clear enough to identify. Dragonflies are often plagued by mites, but this looks a little large for that. Sometimes Psuedoscorpions hitch rides on flying insects, a phenomenon known as phoresy. Sadly, we just can’t be sure. You want to know how Damselflies Do It. The male grasps the female around the neck with pincers he possesses on the tip of his abdomen. She then twists around with her abdomen to accept the sperm. Many species of Damselflies stay in this position while the eggs are laid, with the female depositing the eggs underwater. I’m sure the extra pairs of wings help to lift her back into the air after an egg has been laid. This is such a wonderful addition to our brand new Bug Love page.

Correction: Sat, Feb 21, 2009 at 3:11 AM
Good morning,
If I may, the first pics shows a female of Prince Baskettail (Epitheca princeps) and the things at the end of the abdmen are eggs. It is a distinctive behavior of the genus Epitheca, the female expluse eggs, with the abdomen croooked, that accumulate outside the abdomen. When there is enough eggs the female take flight and tip the mass of eggs into the water.
The second pic show what are Orange Bluets (Enallagma signatum), in this case the little things on the abdomen are indeed Acarian bugs.
Renaud, Switzerland

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

help identify this moth
Hi, I photographed this moth in my backyard yesterday, 7-5-05. Could you please help me with identification? Any help would be greatly appreciated. We live in Laingsburg, MI if that is any help geographically. Thanks again,
Kevin Dutil

Hi Kevin,
This is the second Squash Vine Borer, Melittia satyriniformis, we received in two days. The larvae bore into squash and pumpkin stems and kill the plants.

3 pics
Hi! I’m in Florida and I have 3 pictures I have questions about. … And last, but not least…..I think you know what I’m going to ask :0) Thanks!
Jaime

So Jaime,
You want to know how Damselflies Do It. The male grasps the female around the neck with pincers he possesses on the tip of his abdomen. She then twists around with her abdomen to accept the sperm. Many species of Damselflies stay in this position while the eggs are laid, with the female depositing the eggs underwater. I’m sure the extra pairs of wings help to lift her back into the air after an egg has been laid. This is such a wonderful addition to our brand new Bug Love page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

3 pics
Hi! I’m in Florida and I have 3 pictures I have questions about. One is of some sort of bug…possibly a cricket or cicada? I’ve asked several people and they are not sure.
Thanks!
Jaime

Hello again Jaime,
Your photo is a wonderful image of a Southeastern Lubber Grasshopper, Romalea microptera. They have short wings and are incapable of flight. There are two different color variations. They are found in gardens, fields and on roadsides. Adults appear in June and are active until November. They can give off a foul smelling liquid when they are handled.

eating
I think this is an Eastern Pondhawk female devouring a Ruby Meadowhawk- at least all the other Meadowhawks around were Ruby Meadowhawks. I never seem the see males with prey- are they less voracious or just less conspicuous? thanks- i just discovered your wonderful site.
Pam Burtt

Wow Pam,
What a great photo. We have always been under the impression that females of the species were better hunters.

GREAT SITE
Dear Bugman,
Thanks for the great site. I have a cabin in Northern Michigan, and over the past couple of years, I have noticed a very large strange looking insects which I have not been able to identify in any bug book that I have looked at…but I did find it on your site, along with a lot of very informative information. The insects were giant ichneumon. Unfortunate to say though, there were several on the one tree, and with having small kids around, a bug that size that looked like a wasp, was met with a dose of wasp spray. I wish that I had read your articles earlier, and finding out that they are harmless, they could have provided some interesting viewing, expecially after knowing that they did not sting. Thanks for the great site, keep it up and running, as it is definatly one of the most informative bug sites that I have found. Sam

Thanks for your kind letter Sam. Future Ichneumons thank you as well.