Subject: Beetle
Location: North Dakota
October 12, 2016 11:25 pm
Found crawling in the house. Would like to know if they are poisonous as I am an avid reptile collector and breeder and they may be attracted to my bioactive vivariums.
The grid is a cutting mat with 1/2″ squares marked.
Signature: Bee Green

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Bee,
This is a Western Conifer Seed Bug, a species that frequently enters homes to hibernate when the weather begins to turn cold.  To the best of our knowledge, they are not poisonous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pretty picture
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
October 12, 2016 6:30 pm
I am an amateur bug collector & cannot figure out what in the world this one is.
Found it on a leaf on a sidewalk in the autumn (I believe) of 2013. Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Soft, domed body.
The photo was taken with a camera phone through a simple microscope. Ignored the bug for a little bit, noticed it wasn’t on the microscope, & found it working its way up my nearby brass lamp. Placed back outside on the leaf.
Signature: LT

Crowned Slug

Crowned Slug

Dear LT,
This is a Crowned Slug Caterpillar,
Isa textula, and we verified its identity on BugGuide.  You should exercise caution in handling the Crowned Slug as it is a member of the Stinging Slug Caterpillar family Limacodidae.

Subject: strange bug that looks like dead leaves
Location: woodbridge, ontario (canada)
October 12, 2016 8:06 am
Hello
In Ontario, Canada
October 12, 2016
Saw this bug resting on wall
What is it??
Signature: Ivana

Pandorus Sphinx

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Ivana,
This lovely Hawkmoth is a Pandorus Sphinx, and sadly, your image lacks the type of clarity needed to really appreciate the beauty of this species.  Interestingly, we have several images on our site that also use bricks as a nice sense of scale, including this individual from Tennessee and this Pandorus Sphinx from Ohio sighted during National Moth Week in 2013.

Hello Daniel.  Thank you for your reply
I did not want to frighten it yesterday so did not approach closely.  It is still resting in the same spot this morning.  I approached closer and took this picture for you
My concern is the colder weather.   Will this hawkmoth survive?

Pandorus Sphinx

Pandorus Sphinx

Hi Ivana,
Thanks for sending a higher quality image.  Hawkmoths are relatively long lived, for moths, but we are speculating six weeks would constitute a long life for a Hawkmoth.  Insects are amazingly resilient to fluctuations in weather, but we imagine by the time winter sets in, the life of this individual will have ended.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  October 13, 2016
We are also finding Painted Tiger Moths at our porch light in Mount Washington, Los Angeles, so it is fair to say they are currently flying in Southern California.

Subject: Strange creature
Location: Soquel Ca
October 11, 2016 7:07 pm
What the heck is it??? 2 heads!!!
Signature: Eve

Mating Painted Tiger Moths

Mating Painted Tiger Moths

Dear Eve,
The reason there are two heads is that one head belongs to the larger female on the right and the other to the male.  This is a mating pair of Painted Tiger Moths, a relatively common California species that is most common in winter months.

wow you are awesome to get back to me thank you! , I just figured it out!!!! how embarrassing!!!!!  as one has left and eggs are in the place, so funny I really thought it was a 2 headed thing  and not a couple!!!! jeez are they good for the garden?  Thanks again

The larva of the Painted Tiger Moth is a Woolly Bear that is a general feeder that is quite fond of weeds, so one could argue that though the adults do not eat and do not pollinate plants, the caterpillars can help keep back weeds.  The diet of the caterpillars is described on BugGuide as:  “Larvae are generalists of low herbacious plants.”

Subject: Itty bitty pincers in KSA
Location: Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
October 11, 2016 11:49 pm
My wife found this little guy, about 8mm crawling on her laptop this morning. We are new to KSA from USA and have seen some interesting little creatures and were wondering if you could help us out identifying this one.
Signature: Isaac

Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

Dear Isaac,
This is the larva of a Lacewing, commonly called an Aphid Wolf.  We get countless submissions of Lacewing larvae from around the world, including many from the USA.

Subject: What is this caterpillar
Location: Paphos Cyprus
October 12, 2016 4:02 am
There are a lot of these very mobile caterpillars in the hedges around our villa in Cyprus – we guess they are Hawk Moths but something more specific would be appreciated. They are light green over 30mm long with a ponounced rear face with yellow horn , longitudinal stripes either side and light coloured almost illuminous vertical stripes. The front face has small whitish eyes st back along the head.
Signature: Regards Ray

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Ray,
As you noticed, the backward facing yellow horn is quite distinctive, and also indicative that this is a Hawkmoth caterpillar or Hornworm in the family Sphingidae.  Is there much oleander growing in the vicinity where they were discovered?  This is a very green Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillar,
Daphnis nerii, and according to Wildscreen Arkive:  “As they get older, the larvae become green to brown with a large blue-and-white eyespot near the head and a yellow ‘horn’ on the rear. There is also a white band along the side of the body, with a scattering of small white and bluish dots alongside it. The spiracles on the sides of the body are black.  Older oleander hawk-moth larvae measure around 7.5 to 8.5 centimetres in length.  Just before it pupates, the oleander hawk-moth larva becomes browner in colour. ”  Most images of Oleander Hawkmoth Caterpillars on our site are pre-pupal and browner in color.