Subject: Large brown beetle
Location: Linton, North Dakota
June 18, 2016 9:45 pm
Linton ND June 18, 2016 10pm. Large brown beetle close to a shop light laying on the ground.
I’ve never seen a beetle this large in ND before. I’m just wondering what it was. It was about 1.5″ long with fuzzy “feelers” that were about an inch long each.
Signature: Eric Jensen

Prionus fissicornis

Prionus fissicornis

Dear Eric,
This is one of the Root Borers in the genus Prionus, and though we have countless examples on our site, we are thrilled that we have identified your individual on BugGuide as Prionus fissicornis because it has so many segments on its antennae.  According to BugGuide:  “ant[ennae] w/ at least 25 antennomeres (‘antennal segments’), often over 30.”  Your individual is a male.  BugGuide also notes:  “Larvae are root feeders on grasses” and “Adults active May-July.”  Beetles in the Bush has an entertaining account on this species.  Your submission represents a new species for our site.

I’ll try to get a better picture of one for you with our 35mm camera. It should be way clearer than the first picture I sent.
Thank you very much for replying. I appreciate it!
ERIC JENSEN

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cool Bug
Location: Ottawa, Ohio
June 18, 2016 7:02 pm
Hoping someone can identify this really cool looking insect.
Signature: Not sure

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

This spectacular insect is a male Dobsonfly, and it is one of our most common summer identification requests.  Despite his formidable looking mandibles, the male Dobsonfly cannot bite and is perfectly harmless, though his mate who has considerably shorter mandibles can deliver a somewhat painful bite that could even draw blood, though she too is considered harmless as she has no poison nor venom.

Subject: What is this?
Location: Southern Ohio
June 18, 2016 4:02 pm
Found this creature in the woods, curled up in a ball. (Was around 1:30 in June).
Signature: Fallistar

Flatbacked Millipede

Flatbacked Millipede

Dear Fallistar,
We identified your colorful Flatbacked Millipede as
 Apheloria virginiensis corrugata on BugGuide where it states:  “Caution: Many millipedes with bright color patterns secrete a compound containing cyanide. Wash your hands after handling them and do not allow children to pick them up. ‘Millipedes are entirely non-toxic to humans and can be picked up by hand. Some secretions discolor the skin, but this wears away in a few days without lasting effect. Some large, cylindrical, tropical species squirt their defensive secretions up to a half meter (2-3 feet) and can blind chickens and dogs. Their fluids are painful if they get into the eyes, and persons working with tropical millipedes should be suitably cautious.’ ~Rowland Shelley”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large orange beetle
Location: Doyle California
June 12, 2016 11:16 pm
I found this guy/gal on my screen door, a bit bigger than a silver dollar, I left him be after snapping a picture, but my curiosity plagues me, can you help? Doyle ca, us, only about 30 miles away from Nevada. Thank you!
Signature: Zanetta Terry

Yellow Douglas Fir Borer

Yellow Douglas Fir Borer

Dear Zanetta,
This is a Yellow Douglas Fir Borer,
Centrodera spurca, a species that is found in western states.

Subject: Black & Yellow Bug
Location: Tarrant County Texas
June 13, 2016 4:12 pm
Any idea what this bug is.
Signature: RBG

Cottonwood Borer

Cottonwood Borer

Dear RBG,
Though your image is not properly focused, we are thrilled to post the first Cottonwood Borer sighting of the year reported to our site.  We generally get several submissions of Cottonwood Borers from Texas and Oklahoma each June.

Subject: Type of blister beetle??
Location: Central New Mexico
June 13, 2016 8:07 pm
Hello! We have suddenly noticed thousands of these small beetle type creatures in and around our barn during mid June. We live in Stanley, New Mexico, which is about 50 miles east of Albuquerque and about 45 miles south of Santa Fe. A friend told me they are blister beetles which I know can be very dangerous for horses. I’m hoping she is incorrect and that you can reassure me they are harmless little beings 😊. They seem to be everywhere. Thanks!!
Signature: Kristy

Spotted Blister Beetle

Spotted Blister Beetle

Dear Kristy,
This is indeed a Spotted Blister Beetle,
Epicauta pardalis, based on images posted to Alexander Wild Photography and to BugGuide.  According to PetMD:  “Blister beetles are extremely toxic when ingested by horses: as few as five to ten beetles may be fatal to a horse.  The cantharidin toxin affects many bodily systems.  It is extremely irritating to the digestive tract and causes blisters and erosions from the lips and tongue all the way through to the lining of the intestines, which causes abdominal pain (colic) and diarrhea.  This toxin also causes damage to the kidneys and the heart.”  It is our understanding that problems occur when Blister Beetles are feeding on alfalfa that is harvested to provide feed, and not from horses eating Blister Beetles that might be found near stables.  This is a new species of Blister Beetle for our site.

Spotted Blister Beetle

Spotted Blister Beetle

Thanks so much for the info Daniel!
Kristy