Subject: Huge spider
Location: Mexico, Guerrerero State
December 2, 2015 2:01 pm
This guy is 4 inches across. Several of them in my friend’s garden making webs 10 feet across.
Signature: JR

Golden Silk Spider

Golden Silk Spider

Dear JR,
The Golden Silk Spider or Banana Spider,
Nephila clavipes, is not an aggressive spider, nor is it dangerous, but it is capable of biting a human if provoked.  This spider is known to have extremely strong webs spun with golden silk.  Your individual is a female.  The males are considerably smaller than the females and they can often be found living in the web with the female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown moth
Location: Orange County, CA
November 26, 2015 7:17 pm
Hi. This moth was on my car window in early morning November. Irvine, So Calif. What is he??
Signature: JulieE

Erythrina Borer

Erythrina Borer

Dear JulieE,
Your image of an Erythrina Borer,
Terastia meticulosalis, is so much better than the one we took at of offices last October.  The Erythrina Borer is an unforgetable moth.

Thank you! I could not figure it out. It was truly wonderful!!!

Stay tuned for our review

A nice gift idea for butterfly fans

A nice gift idea for butterfly fans

Subject: Butterflies Book
Website: http://www.fireflybooks.com/
November 25, 2015 1:42 pm
Hi Daniel,
I’ve been reading through your blog and there is so much amazing information here! I’ve seen bugs that I never knew existed before. What a great resource on the web.
I’m writing because I think your readers will love our new book, Butterflies. The book features some of the most colorful, spectacular and sometimes weird examples of the world’s butterflies and moths. Thomas Marent’s stunning photographs provide a close-up view of the remarkable family of insects known as Lepidoptera. The macro photography complements the enlightening text written by zoologist Ronald Orenstein, who explains the scientific curiosities of these amazing insects. Examples include such seldom-seen species as the green dragontail (Indonesia), Mexican kite-swallowtail (Costa Rica), the alpine black swallowtail (China) and European sulphurs.
Would you like a review copy? If so, send me your mailing address and I’ll send one off to you.
Best,
Caroline
Signature: Caroline Young

December 2, 2015
Dear Caroline,
The Butterflies arrived today and we haven’t opened it yet.  We cannot get past the stunningly beautiful cover
image of an amorous pair of Marbled White Butterflies (see Butterflies).  Do you have an image to accompany the posting we will be writing?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Walk Through Natural Area Turns Up Interesting Critters
Location: Juno Beach, Florida
December 2, 2015 12:06 pm
Hello Whats That Bug!
Love your site – use it all the time to identify the small creepy crawlies we find on Palm Beach County natural areas. Usually I can successfully find the critters name while looking through the photos on your web site. I am having a bit of trouble with a pesky caterpillar which defies identification. It was found at Juno Dunes Natural Area in Juno Beach, Florida. There were several on the same plant. Any help in naming this guy (I’m calling him Harry for now) will be appreciated. I am also including two other photos taken during my walk through Juno Dunes Natural Area – one of a Carolina mantid (didn’t see wings, so I’m assuming it is a juvenile) and a lynx spider (I assume it is a green lynx, but it doesn’t look quite right). Thanks for all you do to ensure the proper identification of insects and arachnids!
Signature: Ann Mathews

Green Lynx Spider

Green Lynx Spider

Dear Ann,
Your image of a Green Lynx Spider is positively gorgeous, and because we do not need to do any research, we can post it immediately.  Your other requests will require a bit or more of research, and we are postponing that until later.  Additionally, because your three attached images represent three unrelated groups of Arthropods, we will be creating three separate postings.

Thanks for replying so quickly. Okay, so I at least had the green lynx spider identified correctly. I guess the mantid may be an exotic Chinese mantis – I was looking up pictures of them at the same time and thought there might be a possibility that the mantid in my picture was an exotic. And for now, the caterpillar’s name will remain “Harry” until further notice. I appreciate all your help – What’s That Bug has made updating our natural area wildlife listings much easier!
Ann Mathews

Subject: Pretty Turk’s and Caicos Insect
Location: Turks and Caicos
December 1, 2015 7:52 am
Good day!
Can you tell me what this insect is? We found them in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos. Is it a Turk’s Red Cap?
Cheers,
Signature: Levi

St. Andrews Cotton Stainers

St. Andrews Cotton Stainers

Dear Levi,
Though many islands have endemic species, we believe your Red Bugs in the family Pyrrhocoridae are St. Andrew’s Cotton Stainers,
Dysdercus andreae, a species reported from West Indies according to BugGuide.  Many insects in the family are known to form large aggregations of both adults and nymphs as pictured in your image.  Adults have wings and nymphs do not.  Turk’s Red Cap may be a local name, but when we researched that all we found were numerous references to a plant in the genus Malvaviscus as pictured on Almost Eden.

Wow, thank you so much for the help!

Subject: Terrified in Northern California
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
December 1, 2015 3:38 pm
Found this spider on my back fence. Curious to know what type this is.
Signature: Nervous in San Francisco Bay Area

Banded Orbweaver

Banded Orbweaver

Dear Nervous,
Calm yourself.  Though it is large, brightly colored and somewhat frightening, this Banded Orbweaver,
Argiope trifasciata, is perfectly harmless.  Orbweavers seldom leave their webs, so this gal must have been evicted.  They have very mild venom and they are very reluctant to bite people.