Subject:  What is this
Geographic location of the bug:  Malanda Far North Queensland Australia
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 04:25 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I am very interested to find out what caterpillar this is
How you want your letter signed:  From Austin

Birdwing Caterpillar

Dear Austin,
This stunning caterpillar is a Birdwing Caterpillar, but we cannot say for certain if it is a Cape York Birdwing, our first choice that is pictured on Butterfly House, or if it is the caterpillar of a Cairn’s Birdwing, also pictured on Butterfly House.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Louisiana
Date: 04/19/2018
Time: 09:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Ordered crawfish and this was inside with them
How you want your letter signed:  Just wondering

Cocklebur

This is not an insect.  This is a seed pod commonly called a Cocklebur.

Subject:  Found on grape vine
Geographic location of the bug:  Las Vegas, NV
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 01:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this “giant mosquito” looking insect on a grape vine.  What is it? Is it beneficial?
How you want your letter signed:  Dave

Crane Fly

Dear Dave,
This is a Crane Fly, and in some parts of the country they are known as Skeeter Hawks.  They do not sting nor bite and they pose no threat to humans.  Beneficial is a tough term to describe in terms of insects.  Birds and other predators will eat Crane Flies, so they do fill an important link in the food chain. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Is this a spider?
Geographic location of the bug:  Lahore, Pakistan
Date: 04/18/2018
Time: 07:32 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I just found this crawly in my house today and I have no idea what it is. Not even, if it’s a spider or not (can’t figure out what if its extremetimes is a leg and what is an antennae…) It is about 1 cm long and when I captured it under a glass, it kept on holding up its arms/ antennae in defiance, and curled up its tail part (similar to how a scorpion would do it).
Really would like to find out, what this is. Thank you and love from Pakistan.
How you want your letter signed:  Juju EA

Sun Spider: Solifugid

Dear Juju EA,
Though it is commonly called both a Sun Spider and a Wind Scorpion, this Solifugid is an Arachnid classified in the order Solifugae.  Unlike both Spiders and Scorpions, this Solifugid has no venom, nor is it poisonous, so except for a painful bite from a large individual like a Camel Spider, it does not pose a threat to humans.

Wind Scorpion: Solifugid

Subject:  some beetle??
Geographic location of the bug:  Bay Area, California
Date: 04/17/2018
Time: 02:15 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug on my peas and oats! Sorry for the bad picture. Is it a harmful insect that I should work to control? If so, how do I do so? Thank you!!
How you want your letter signed:  Jayde

Soldier Beetle

Dear Jayde,
This is a Soldier Beetle in the family Cantharidae, and according to iNaturalist, there are many species in California.  Your individual might be 
Podabrus pruinosus comes based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide: “Adults eat nectar, pollen, other insects; larvae are fluid-feeding predators, feed on insect eggs and larvae” which means they are a beneficial family.  

Subject:  Mantid for identification
Geographic location of the bug:  near Kaeng Krachan NP, Thailand
Date: 04/17/2018
Time: 03:06 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Any help with the identification of this Mantid would be much appreciated.
How you want your letter signed:  Many thanks Steve

Leaf Insect

Dear Steve,
This is not a Mantid.  It is a Leaf Insect in the order Phasmida, and we have some amazing images in our archive where a Leaf Insect is being eaten by a Mantid in Thailand.  Our current research found matching images on Dreamtime and Shutterstock but there is no species name.  The website we used in our initial identification of the species is no longer active, but we did find images of
Phyllium siccifolium on BugWorld and on Our Breathing Planet where it states:  “Phyllium Siccifolium is a type of leaf insect which has no acknowledged common name. It was, in fact, the first species of leaf insect recognized. Like all species of this type of insect, they remain masters of camouflage. They are primarily active at either dusk or night. Phyllium Siccifolium is entirely herbivorous by nature.”