Subject:  Spider eating an ant?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fort Collins, CO
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 09:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this lovely spider on my Siberian iris this evening. I can’t tell but it looks like she’s eating an ant, maybe? I’d love to know the species of spider as I haven’t seen one like this. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Sheryl Highsmith

Western Lynx Spider eats Ant

Dear Sheryl,
The spiny legs and shape of the body reminded us of a Green Lynx Spider, and we quickly identified this Western Lynx Spider,
Oxyopes scalaris, thanks to images on BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Please ID
Geographic location of the bug:  Guatemala
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 01:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My cousin sent me a picture of an insect she found and didn’t know what it was.
How you want your letter signed:  Moises

Planthoppers

Dear Moises,
We believe these are Planthoppers in the family Fulgoridae, and though they bear a superficial resemblance to the invasive Spotted Lanternflies, they do not look like the same species.  We have not been able to find any visual matches online, so we cannot provide you with a species name.  Perhaps one of our readers will have more luck than we have had at an identification.

Planthoppers

Subject:  What is this??
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest iowa
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 07:37 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this?  Looks like a wasp but for its tail like thing and design on body.  Tail thing comes out of body about 1/4″ from end of body! Coin in the picture is a quarter for visual comparison.
How you want your letter signed:  Concerned Mimi

Giant Ichneumon

Dear Concerned Mimi,
This is a harmless, beneficial Giant Ichneumon in the genus
Megarhyssa, sometimes called a Stump Stabber because the female uses her lengthy ovipositor to lay her eggs in diseased and dying trees where the larvae will be able to feed on the the wood boring larvae of Horntails.  We believe your individual is Megarhyssa macrurus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Insect attached to caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Macon, Ga
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 07:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Was curious what this insect is?
How you want your letter signed:  Evan S. Thomas

Giant Strong Nosed Stink Bug nymph eats Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Evan,
Though most Stink Bugs feed on plants, those in the subfamily Asopinae, the Predatory Stink Bugs, prey on other insects and arthropods.  We quickly identified this Strong Nosed Stink Bug nymph,
Alcaeorrhynchus grandis, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  The prey is a Tussock Moth Caterpillar.

Subject:  Two lovebirds
Geographic location of the bug:  Waleska Georgia
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 04:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw these two on back of my home. They have bright orange body with bold magenta wings with white spots.
How you want your letter signed:  Cyndi

Mating Oakworm Moths

Dear Cyndi,
These are mating Oakworm Moths in the genus
Anisota, and there are several similar looking species in the genus, and based on BugGuide data, at least four species are known from Georgia.

Subject:  Bugs on Butterlfy weed plant
Geographic location of the bug:  Annapolis, MD USA
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 11:31 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen orange and blank milkweed bugs before, but these are bright pink and blue.
How you want your letter signed:  zelda

Why are Eastern Boxelder Bug nymphs on Milkweed?

Dear Zelda,
These are immature True Bugs, and we checked BugGuide to verify that they are not Large Milkweed Bug nymphs, nor do they match BugGuide images of Small Milkweed Bug nymphs.  They appear to be Eastern Boxelder Bug nymphs based on this BugGuide image, which begs the question:  Why are they on Milkweed?  We don’t know.  Is there a maple or boxelder tree nearby?

Thank you so much for replying. Yes, there is a maple tree not too far away, but not directly near this patch. So interesting – I will keep watching. Love the web site; I just found it!

We would love to see images of the winged adults.

Ok, I’ll be on the lookout – about how long does maturation take?

We suspect you should have adults within a month.