Hi,
I am scratching all over after seeing the pictures of the bugs on your site… 😉 My boys caught a bug today and put it in a jar (boys will be boys) and asked me what it was. Now, I am no bug woman so I found you on the web…. It’s got three pairs of fuzzy black legs, Two wings that are a shiny blueish-green. Its body is in three parts. It’s got two mandibles (is that what those things on the mouth are called??). It looks like a giant fuzzy spider/bee!! I am reading this and I can’t
believe it!!! Well, I hope I have given enough info for you to start identifying this thing in a jar right next to me!!!!!! (eeek!)
Thanks,
Cynthia

Hi Cynthia,
Might be a Carpenter Bee. All insects have
six legs and three body parts, so that is a general description. Bees are often hairy, so your guess might be correct.

Thanks, I don’t think it’s a carpenter bee cause it is much bigger (2.5 to 3 cm). The body (the third part) is like a shiny black slinky and is fuzzy on the edges. I tried to take pictures of it, here is one : Boy, what a mommy will do for her boys, and thank god there are people who have the info!!
Thanks again,
cynthia

Hi again Cynthia,
We are fairly sure that is a Carpenter Bee. Don’t know where you are writing from or what the species is.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Odd Looking wasp and a few for your collection!
Hi there Bug People!
The evening of 3-August we were visiting a relative in Maryland (see particular data below). The evening was still, warm and humid. Clear sky for the most part. I was out near the porch light (as I usually am at this location due to the great number of insects, spiders, frogs and toads that appear each eve). I managed to get two photos of the insect in question – the better of the two is showing the specimen about 1 1/2 longer than it actually was. I originally thought this to be an Ichneumon Wasp…but now I am not sure. I can find no image of a similar type in the species. So, the question is: What exactly is this not-so-little lovely? you will see some left overs from its tangle with a spider web on the front left leg. Thank you for your time.

I like to photograph only the most taken for granted of things in the world…lowly mushrooms and fungus, insects, small rodents, amphibians, etc… I have included a few ( a very small sampling ) of my ‘insect world’ favorites for 2004. Hope you enjoy them! (Personally, I love the Imperial Moth that befriended my hand…the Stag is second place) All of these photos are from the location described below.
Kindest Regards,
Scott Pierson
Actual Location Data: (of all insect photos attached) Earleville, MD – in a small, private community named ‘Hazelmoor’.
Latitude: 39.4401 Longitude: -76.0247
Time is always (approx) between the hours of 20:30 to 00:00 hrs, EDT

My Goodness, Scott,
I admire the structuralist tendencies you have applied to your insect photographs. Your Odd Looking Wasp is Pelecinus polyturator, a large and striking insect. According to Borror and Delong: “The female is 2 inches or more in length, shining black, with the abdomen very long and slender; the male, which is extremely rare in this country, is about an inch long and has the posterior part of the abdomen swollen. The females do not sting. this insect is parasitic on the larvae of June Beetles.” The 4 3/4 inches you have indicated on your photograph makes your specimen a behemoth. We agree that your Imperial Moth photo is amazing.

Thank you for your reply – I didn’t realize that you’d already posted it the website! My previous email did not include that “I think the site is great!” What a service to folks – especially those interested in insects. This is a great wealth of information and the fact that there are photos to examine is priceless. It’s great that you take the time to help folks out like this. Thank you again! Kindest Regards, Scott Pierson

A few for your collection!
Hi there Bug People!
I like to photograph only the most taken for granted of things in the world…lowly mushrooms and fungus, insects, small rodents, amphibians, etc… I have included a few ( a very small sampling ) of my ‘insect world’ favorites for 2004. Hope you enjoy them! (Personally, I love the Imperial Moth that befriended my hand…the Stag is second place) All of these photos are from the location described below.
Kindest Regards,
Scott Pierson
Actual Location Data: (of all insect photos attached) Earleville, MD – in a small, private community named ‘Hazelmoor’.
Latitude: 39.4401 Longitude: -76.0247
Time is always (approx) between the hours of 20:30 to 00:00 hrs, EDT

Male Stag Beetle Grapevine Beetle

My Goodness, Scott,
I admire the structuralist tendencies you have applied to your insect photographs. We are posting your Stag Beetle, Pseudolucanus capreolus male, and your Grapevine Beetle, Pelidnota punctata, on our Beetles 2004 Page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

The other is a beetle, I think it’s either a flea beetle or a case-bearing leaf beetle. It’s hind femora are enlarged, but it also has yellow patches on the elytra where most flea beetles have solid colored elytra.
Thanks again,
Dave

Hi Dave,
We agree that your beetle is a Flea Beetle, more specifically Phyllotreta bipustulata. They vary from 1.6 to 2.5 mm in length and are blackish with orange elytral spots. “The hind tibia of Phyllotreta” according to Lutz, “are not grooved on the outer edge, but slightly excavated near the tip and with a spur at the middle beneath.” A close relative that is similarly colored but with different markings is Phyllotreta vittata, which is common on cabbage.

What an excellent and fun website! I thought you might be able to help me with two mystery bugs that have proven baffling. The second is this strange bug my entomology class in Puerto Rico. We were stuck, and I still am – I can’t place it to order even, although the mouthparts and thorax might suggest some weird orthopteran. This specimen was about 2 and a half cm from antennae-tip to the base of wings.
Thanks!
Robbie

Hi Robbie,
Thanks for the photos of the exotica. They are a mystery to us as well. Your Puerto Rican Orthopteran looks according to Eric Eaton, to be probably a longhorned beetle (Cerambycidae).

Ed. Note: We just received the following correction.
(08/09/2005) identifications Hello – I was recently shown your site, and it is excellent. My specialization is longhorned beetles, and in cruising around I notice a number of incomplete or uncertain IDs for this family. I don’t know if you are interested in receiving this sort of input, but if you are, I offer the following additions to your identifications.
This is a species of Bebelis, probably lignosa, or perhaps schwarzi; no species is specifically recorded from Puerto Rico, but several my occur there. The larvae typically bore in small stems of semi-woody plants (sunflower, ragweed, etc.) Cheers.
Frank Hovore

Spider
I happened on your site while trying to search for the type of spider I found in my garden last year (actually, in the plants that grew out of the compost pile). I’ve never seen a spider like this in this area before (Northern Massachusetts) or since. I don’t have any good size comparison in the pictures I got except that those are pumpkin leaves he’s (she’s?) on. I would estimate the diameter of the circle formed by the legs was about 3 inches. anyway, if you could identify this spider for me, I’d appreciate it.
Thanks,
Greg

Hi Greg,
We have lots of photos and information on the Golden Orb Weaver, or Yellow Garden Spider, Argiope aurantia or Miranda aurantia, on our two spider pages. We agree that this spider is always startling to see, but though it can bite painfully, it seldom does. Your female looks very mature.