hi
I live in Minnesota and have had a bit of a shock when I discovered pseudoscorpions visiting my home. At first we didn’t have a clue what they were and looked up all sorts of possibilities before finally stumbling on their true identity.I know that they are harmless but my mom goes CRAAAAZY at the site of any sort of insect in the house. So, I was wondering if regular anti-bug chemicals would work such as bugbombs, sprays, etc.. the reasons that we want to go to these extremes is because I have found 3 of them in my room(2 of which were in my bed) and can’t figure out how they got there besides grabbing a ride with the laundry which is done in the basement. And from reading on them they apparently like damp places, which would explain a lot since water leaks into the basement whenever it rains. Problem is this can’t be helped or prevented at the moment. And like I said my mom is going nuts (I can’t say that I’m too enthusiastic at the thought of them being in my bed either). We were also wondering why they became so prevalent all of the sudden since we have never seen them in our house before and have now found 4 in the past month (3 in my room, 2 in my bed, 1 dead one caught in a cobweb). Any info on the extermination of these bugs would be greatly appreciated!
Th

Sorry Th,
Your best source for any erradication decision is a local exterminator, though that sounds like extreme measures to me. We promote coexistance with the lower beasts.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Saw this bug crawling around on the front of our house and front stoop. It has 8 red legs and looks like it has three segments. Is this a spider? I’d hate to find this crawling around on my bed one night. Should we be concerned about this bug? We live on the east coast.
Bruce

Dear Bruce,
It’s a spider. I’m not sure exactly what, but it is impressive. I will
continue to try to identify it. How large was it? Where on the east coast?

Daniel,
We live in Calvert County, Maryland. The spider was about 3/4″ long. Let me
know what you find out. This is a scary looking spider for sure!
Bruce

Dear Bruce,
I have been obsessed with your spider.After hours online, I found it. It is one of three spiders on the endangered species list in Maryland, and is also endangered in most of its range. It seems to be most common in Alabama, though fire ants and armadillos have harmed its numbers there as well. I hope your red legged purseweb spider is still among the living. Here is some additional information I copied from a site. Thank you for your awesome photo. Sphodros rufipes Found in Alabama The First Recorded Distribution of the Purseweb Spider, Sphodros rufipes (Family Atypidae), from Alabama. Rose M. Parrino, W. Mike Howell,Ph.D., and Ronald L. Jenkins,Ph.D., Department of Biology, Samford University, Birmingham, AL 35229 The spider family Atypidae represents an ancient branch of the infraorder Mygalomorphae. These large, primitive spiders have been recorded for most of the southeastern United States, but no records have been documented for the State of Alabama. It is the purpose of this report to officially record the purseweb spider, Sphodros rufipes Latreille from Alabama. These spiders are referred to as “purseweb spiders” because of the tough, tubular web which they construct in the ground at the base of a tree and extend aerially up the side of the tree attaching it to the tree’s bark. The web is further camouflaged by the addition of lichens, algae, dead leaf bits, dirt and other debris to its surface. When an insect disturbs the web’s surface, the purseweb spider reacts by biting its prey through the tube, cutting a slit, repairing the slit, and awaiting another meal. According to Gertsch and Platnick (1980, Amer. Mus. Novitates No. 2704: 1-39, figs. 1-60), S. rufipes previously has been found at four sites in Tennessee, two in North Carolina, one in Georgia, six in northern Florida, two in Mississippi, four in Louisiana, and one in Texas. A population of Sphodros rufipes was discovered at the Ruffner Mountain Nature Center, Jefferson County, AL, (T 17S, R 2W, sec 13) on 16 Oct. 1997. The aerial portion of the web was approximately 140 mm above the ground and a uniform 20 mm in its width. Only 10-12 mm of the top portion of the tube was attached to tree, and this portion of the tube was white and not camouflaged. When the underground portion of the web, which extended to approximately 160 mm, was excavated and the tubular web was removed, it was found to contain a large female spider, 25 mm in total body length. The web also contained approximately 228 spiderlings, each about 2.5 mm in total body length. All spiderlings, except for 10 specimens, were returned to the site. The 10 spiderlings and the adult female were preserved for scientific documentation and deposited in the American Museum of Natural History. The adult specimen was examined by Dr. Norman Platnick, who verified it as S. rufipes.

Thanks for posting a site that allowed me to identify this beautiful creature! I thought you’d like the photo as it is pretty nice. I’ve seen these all my life growing up in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, but never knew what they were called (everyone else calls them ‘stone flies’) I also saw my first sun spider that same night. I think that is what it is, anyhow. It confused me with the appearance of having ten legs!
Thanks again, Anthony P.

Those Dobsonfly photos just keep coming.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

My wife found this beetle today.

It was quite large, with the body around 2” long (not counting the antennae).
Thanks!
Richard
Dear Richard,
It is a beautiful photo of a COTTONWOOD BORER, Plectrodera scalator.

My wife found this beetle today.

It was quite large, with the body around 2” long (not counting the antennae).
Thanks!
Richard
Dear Richard,
It is a beautiful photo of a COTTONWOOD BORER, Plectrodera scalator.

Hey bugman,
I was recently vacationing in Orlando, FLA visiting the mouse that lives there with the family. Anyhow, we ate out one night in Kissimmee and came across an interesting bug. I would estimate it at about 3 inches long excluding pinchers or claws (whatever you want to call them). It was blakc and reminded me of a large roach or long beetle. Anyhow, at it head extended 2 long pinchers or claws. They were jagged and pointed at the end. Dumby me though the bug was interesting and dcided to toe it a little with my sneaker to get it to move. It moved away but seemed a little aggressive. Anyhow that sucker, after enough stupid taunting by me, latched onto my sneaker and wouldnt let go!!! My wife, with open toed shoes ran like hell into the resteraunt swearing at me the whole way…LOL.. Do you have any idea what bug I was dancing with?
Description : Black , I believe 6 legs, long curved and jagged pinchers (claws) about 3/4 body length extending from head area, 2 -3 " in length, fairly flat insect Anyhow, thanks for reading this and I hope you can tell me what it was. I apoligize for ticking him off too…LOL!
Rick

Hi Rick,
I don’t believe I ever answered your question, and have been in the process of posting new letters, despite the whatsthatbug site being down for heavy traffic. You have encountered a Giant Water Bug also known as a Toe Biter. As you know, they deserve their name.