Subject: caterpillar ID please
Location: Kansas City, MO
December 1, 2016 6:27 pm
Can you ID this caterpillar on a crabapple in the Kansas City area (see photo)
Signature: Dave Tylka

Yellow Necked Caterpillar

Yellow Necked Caterpillar

Dear Dave,
The posture of your caterpillar is a characteristic of the Prominent Moth Caterpillars in the genus Datana.  Your individual looks exactly like this Yellow Necked Caterpillar,
Datana ministra, that is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Early instars feed gregariously and skeletonize leaves.  The larvae feed on Malus, Quercus, Betula and Salix species. Young larvae skeletonise the leaves of their host plant. Later, they feed on all of the leaf except the leaf stalk. They feed in groups.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “A common pest in orchards.”  Crabapple is a Malus species.

Dear Daniel Marlos,
Many thanks for the ID and natural history of the yellow necked caterpillar!  We sincerely appreciate you and your group providing this service to us, the general public.  I will share this lep information.
Thanks again,
Dave Tylka
Native Landscaper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is it?
Location: Sydney, Australia
December 1, 2016 3:20 am
Hi, recently after bringing in the washing a giant moth like bug rose out of my washing. I wish I had taken a photo. It looked nearly as big as my hand.. like a big mottley black/greyish moth type creature. It’s wings moved a bit and it walked around. It’s body was dark and very solid from what I saw. I was hoping for a few suggestions? To lead me in the right direction. I’ve never seen a bug like that my whole life. The picture I put with it was similar, but the one I saw was darker.
Signature: Tiana

Wood Moth, we believe

Wood Moth, we believe

Dear Tiana,
This is either a Ghost Moth in the family Hepialidae (see ButterflyHouse) or a Wood Moth in the family Cossidae (see ButterflyHouse) and we believe it looks like the Wood Moth
Endoxyla secta that is pictured on Butterfly House.  We did make the Giant Wood Moth our Bug of the Month for December.

 

Subject: Six legs and wings
Location: Gold Bar, WA
November 30, 2016 4:49 pm
I have run across two of these in the last month, both about the same size. They do fly, I captured this one in a cup while it was hovering next to the light bulb in a desk lamp. We have lived here ten years and I have not seen any before.
Signature: Dave Zehrung

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Dave,
The Western Conifer Seed Bug is native to the Pacific Northwest, including Washington.  Since the 1960s, its range has significantly expanded to include much of northern North America, and since the 21st Century, Europe as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Hollywood, fl
November 30, 2016 3:15 pm
What type of catetpillar is this
Signature: Dave

Pluto Sphinx Caterpillar

Pluto Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Dave,
Your Caterpillar is the Hornworm of a Pluto Sphinx,
Xylophanes pluto, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “There are three known colour morphs: green, brown, and purple/brown. The false eyes are rather striking in this purple/brown form.  Larvae feed beginning at dusk and through the night, hiding during the day at the base of their host plant or in nearby surrounding vegetation. The caterpillars usually either consume entire leaves or half of a leaf.”

Subject: Ugly Bug
Location: Houston, Texas
November 29, 2016 7:28 pm
I am glad this isn’t 6 feet long!!
Signature: Donathon Houston

Mole Cricket

Mole Cricket

Dear Donathon,
We agree that we would not want to run into a six foot long Mole Cricket, though there are many other lower beasts that we would not want to encounter at that size before the Mole Cricket.  Mole Crickets are subterranean dwellers found in many parts of the world, and they pose no threat to humans in their current size.

Subject: Moth
Location: Brisbane
November 30, 2016 3:46 am
Huge moth dog was trying to get. Was wondering what it is?
Signature: Shaun

Giant Wood Moth we believe

Giant Wood Moth we believe

Dear Shaun,
We believe this is a Giant Wood Moth in the family Cossidae, possibly Endoxyla macleayi which is pictured on Butterfly House, though there are other similar looking species in the same genus.  We would not rule out that it might be a Ghost Moth in the family Hepialidae, a very similar looking family that is well represented on Butterfly House, and we should also point out that other members of the family Cossidae are represented on Butterfly House.  We have difficulty distinguishing between the two families.  Caterpillars of Wood Moths are known as Witchety Grubs.  Because of your timely submission, we have selected this posting as our Bug of the Month for December 2016.