Subject: Green spider
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
April 16, 2016 5:32 pm
What kind of spider?
Signature: Tad

Crab Spider

Crab Spider

Dear Tad,
This is a Crab Spider in the family Thomisidae, and members of the family can be identified because the front two pairs of legs are much longer than the other two pairs.  Your individual is Diaea livens, which we identified on BugGuideBugGuide only contains reports of the species from California.  Your image represents a new species on our site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Northern ca
April 16, 2016 1:21 pm
Hey Mr Bugman
What the heck is this…..all of a Sudden they are all over our garden.
Thanks
Signature: Dennis

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Dear Dennis,
This Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae is a beneficial insect.  The Syrphid Fly larvae feed on Aphids and other agricultural and ornamental plant pests, and the adults are beneficial pollinators.  Many adult Flower Flies mimic stinging bees and wasps, though they are themselves quite harmless as they neither sting nor bite.  We will attempt to identify your Flower Fly by species, but BugGuide has an enormous archive to sift through.

Subject: Snakefly?
Location: Glen Ellen, CA
April 15, 2016 1:06 pm
I was sitting on my back deck when this little bug crawled up next to me on my chair. I stared at it for a long time and couldn’t figure out what it was. Initially worried it was a termite, but considered it could be some kind of flying ant.
I found your site and it looks like it is most likely a female snakefly. Can you confirm?
Thanks!!!
Signature: Bug Rookie

Snakefly

Snakefly

Dear Bug Rookie,
You are correct that this is a Snakefly, and the pointed ovipositor at the end of her abdomen indicates she is a female.  You may be a Bug Rookie, but you did your research admirably, and your image is spectacular.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identity
Location: Palmer Tx
April 15, 2016 3:46 pm
These bugs are everywhere . I need to know what kind is it please?
Signature: Does not matter

Forest Tent Caterpillar

Forest Tent Caterpillar

This is a Forest Tent Caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria, a social species that often feeds in large groups.  Periodically, there are significant population explosions, and based on this submission of Forest Tent Caterpillars we received last week, this is one of those years in Texas.

Subject: What kind of moth is this?
Location: Canton, GA
April 16, 2016 9:16 am
Hello,
I opened my front door this morning to find this very large moth on the door. Could you give me any information regarding what type of moth he is, and perhaps what might have caused his wings to become so damaged.
Signature: Jennifer W

Tulip Tree Silkmoth

Tulip Tree Silkmoth

Dear Jennifer,
This is a Tulip Tree Silkmoth,
Callosamia angulifera, and your individual is a female based on the shape of her antennae.  Silkmoths do not eat as adults, and they live long enough to mate and lay eggs.  Your individual appears to have had an encounter with a bird or other predator, based on the ragged condition of her wings.

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Upstate South Carolina
April 14, 2016 6:55 pm
Dear bugman,
This lovely creature flew up to me and said hello and I have never seen like it before!
I would love to know what it is so that I can educate myself further 🙂
Thank you mucho,
Best,
Kate
Signature: Keep Learning! -Bugman

Giant Stonefly

Giant Stonefly

Dear Kate,
This is a Giant Stonefly in the genus Pteronarcys, and there are several possible species that are found along the eastern seaboard.  You can browse through the images on BugGuide for comparison.