Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Pittsburgh,PA
Date: 05/08/2018
Time: 10:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Here’s the ‘little’ guy.
How you want your letter signed:  Naomi

Luna Moth

Dear Naomi,
Thanks for your comment and also for submitting your image.  This is our first Luna Moth sighting this year.  Generally we received our first sighting report in late January or February and that sighting comes from the south, including Texas and Georgia, and as spring moves north, the sightings continue, including sightings from Maine in June.  We are curious why there is such a dearth of Luna Moth sightings this spring. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle maybe?
Geographic location of the bug:  New Castle, PA
Date: 05/06/2018
Time: 08:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
My brother foundthis bug outside his house. I love Bugs and was interested because I’ve never seen this one before. After trying many different ID tools and researching as I normally do, I’m still drawing a blank. My children and I would love to know if this a beetle and if so, what kind?
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you! Monica C. Edmonds

Hickory Borer

Dear Monica,
Both this Hickory Borer,
Megacyllene caryae, which is active in the spring, and its look-alike relative the Locust Borer which is active in the fall are beetles that mimic stinging wasps, specifically Yellowjackets.  Our editorial staff is from Youngstown, Ohio, and when we return, a visit to New Castle is generally part of the itinerary.

OMGosh thank you! I’m going to tell my brother right now!
Sincerely,
Monica

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Nevada City, Ca
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 10:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please tell us what this moth is?
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Nancy,
This is a Ceanothus Silkmoth, and ironically, you have an image of the moth on a lilac.  Adult Ceanothus Silkmoths do not feed, but the food plant of the caterpillar is the Ceanothus, commonly called a California lilac, which is not related to the blooming lilac in your image.  The antennae on your individual leads us to believe it is a male.

Ceanothus Silkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Colourful from Australia
Geographic location of the bug:  Sydney
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 05:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman, a friend of us found this in Sydney and we have no clue what it is. It’s very beautiful.
How you want your letter signed:  Nexus6

Macadamia Cup Moth Caterpillar:  Mecytha fasciata

Hi,
We’ve solved the mystery :  There is a parent at our school who is an entomologist. It is the caterpillar of the Macadamia Cup Moth ( Mecytha fasciata ). It will turn into a little brown and white furry moth.
Kind regards
Thomas

Dear Thomas,
Thanks for getting back to us.  Of course, though you have provided an identification, we are still posting your image and query because we could not pass up a subject line:  “Colourful from Australia.”  In North America, this family is commonly called the Stinging Slug Caterpillars because many species have venomous spines.
  The Macadamia Cup Moth Caterpillar is also pictured on Australian Nature and Dave’s Garden.  According to Butterfly House “This Caterpillar is green with a yellow stripe down its back. Unusually for this family, it has no tubercles, but is smoothly rounded.”  That is an indication this species does not sting.

Subject:  Cecropia Moths A-mating?
Geographic location of the bug:  Fayetteville, Georgia
Date: 05/05/2018
Time: 07:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there! My mom and I spotted this fuzzy lady hanging out on our front doorway around noon on May 5, 2018. She stayed there all day long, and when I checked again a little after seven, I discovered she had company.
Thanks to your website, I think they’re Cecropia Moths? I’m just a little unsure because the male is so much smaller and darker than the female.
How you want your letter signed:  Lauren C.

Female Promethea Moth

Dear Lauren,
Though they resemble Cecropia Moths, your mating pair are actually Promethea Moths,
Callosamia promethea, which are pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Females come to lights but males do not” though we suspect an exception is that a male will be attracted to a female who was attracted to a light.  BugGuide also indicates an alternate name is Spicebush Silkmoth and states:  “larvae feed on leaves of apple, ash, basswood, birch, cherry, lilac, maple, sassafras, sipcebush [sic], sweetgum, tulip-tree; also recorded on buttonbush, magnolia, and other trees adults do not feed.”

Mating Promethea Moths

Subject:  some sort of cactus bug
Geographic location of the bug:  south central texas
Date: 05/06/2018
Time: 05:50 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  i am familiar with cochineal scale, however these guys are also on spineless cactus…every year…and i have yet to identify them, perhaps they are instars…they do not seem to do a great deal of harm and seem shy and perhaps they do not sting or bite.  i admit to laziness about going through thousands of bug pictures on the off-hand chance i land upon them.  thanks for your time and trouble…seriously apprecate your site.
How you want your letter signed:  victoria

Cactus Coreid

Dear Victoria,
These are multiple instars or developmental stages of immature Cactus Coreids,
Chelinidea vittiger, which are pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “First eggs of the season are deposited in March, longitudinally on the underside of prickly pear spines. The egg laying period in each generation extends over two to three months, the rate of nymphal development varies considerably, and adults are long lived (nine to 12 months).”