Subject: Transparent insect
Location: Australia, Melbourne
March 10, 2016 4:38 pm
Hi, I saw this fella as I was leaving the house for work this morning. Didn’t have a lot of time to stand around so I took a quick snapshot and left. It didn’t move once. I estimate it’s between 1-2cm in total length.
Signature: K

Mayfly Exuvia

Mayfly Exuvia

Dear K,
The insect, most likely a Mayfly, has flown away, leaving behind this exuvia, or cast off exoskeleton.  Since Mayfly larvae are aquatic, we are guessing you live near water.

Hi,
Sorry a little late seeing this reply. Thank you for taking the time!
Actually I live in the suburbs but the closest river is about 3 km away so I guess it’s not surprising. This is the first time I’ve seen one though and figured it wasn’t alive when it stayed there for about a week lol.
Thanks again!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spring Time Bug
Location: Fremont, CA
March 10, 2016 4:59 pm
5 years ago and again this month of March 2016, I found 2 and up 6 of these insects. They are 1/8″ long. I usually find them in a sofa downstairs, but I have also found them in an upstairs window. I mention the 2 occurrences, 5 years apart to indicate that the problem went away on its own initially, without treatment. I have never found large quantities of the insect, but I am still concerned about what course of action I should take. The insects color makes them look different then bed bugs.
Signature: Greg M.

Carpet Beetle

Carpet Beetle

Hi Greg,
This is a Carpet Beetle, a common household pest, and we are quite amazed at your cleaning abilities if you have only found them twice in five years.

Subject: Spider
Location: St louis Missuri
March 9, 2016 11:06 pm
What type of spider is this ?
Is it poisinus?
Signature: Spider man

Parson Spider

Parson Spider

Dear Spider man,
This distinctive spider is a Parson Spider in the genus 
Herpyllus, probably Herpyllus ecclesiasticus.  Like most spiders, it has venom, and like most spiders, it is not considered dangerous to humans.  It is unlikely that it will bite a person, and if a bite does occur, there will likely be nothing more than local irritation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Thank you for your response. Here is the information, I also attached the 2 photos.

Subject: A Red Grub in NC
Geographic Location: North Carolina – Inner Coastal Plain/Piedmont Region
March 9, 2016 9:58 am
My 4-year-old daughter was digging in the dirt on a sunny 75-degree day in early March, in the greater Raleigh area of North Carolina. She discovered a deep-red grub of some sort just a few inches below the surface, and is very interested in what it is so she can learn more about its life cycle, diet, etc. It does not appear to have legs, but does wriggle at the segmented parts, and it looks like it has developing wings or something, though it is one solid mass at this point. Its mouth is very small, black, and 2-pronged. Any ideas? She has already released her critter, but desperately wants to know more, and my endless search through photo archives has yet to yield any promising results. Thank you!
Homeschool Mom

Moth Pupa

Moth Pupa

Dear Homeschool Mom,
We will not be able to provide you with a specific identification, but this is a moth pupa, most likely in the Superfamily Noctuoidea.  Pupae can be very difficult to identify conclusively.  There is quite a debate over the pupae represented in this BugGuide image.  Our gut reaction is that your daughter found an Owlet Moth Pupa from the family Noctuidae.  See BugGuide images here, here and here.  Many Cutworms form similar pupae.  Keeping the pupa in a container covered in a small amount of moist, not damp, dirt will allow it to continue metamorphosis until maturity at which time identification might be easier, but many Owlet Moths are small, drab moths similar in appearance, and exact species identification may take an expert in the family.  Our identifications with Owlet Moths tend to be general.

Thank you so much for your response! I’ll tell her what you said, and we’ll investigate your links. If she finds it again, we’ll watch the process and see for ourselves. Thank you!

Subject: California bee?
Location: Walnut Creek CA open space.
March 9, 2016 5:46 pm
I thought when I took this picture that this was a fly, but it isn’t. Is it a native California bee? I like those antennae.
Signature: Dirk Muehlner

Longhorned Bee

Longhorned Bee

Dear Dirk,
This is a male Longhorned Bee in the tribe Eucerini, and we haven’t the necessary skills to taxonomically identify it further.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “Hairy bees, typically with pale hair bands on the metasoma. Males typically have very long antennae. ”  BugGuide also states:  “Nesting is in the ground for all species. Known nests are vertical burrows in flat ground.”  We have several great images on our site of “bachelor parties” which are aggregations of male Longhorned Bees that spend the night together.

Longhorned Bee

Longhorned Bee

Subject: What is this called?
Location: Southeastern Wisconsin
March 8, 2016 9:33 am
Found this guy in our front hallway, never seen one like this before. Just over a 1/2″ long, tan, black and looks like a little yellow detail.
Signature: SDub

Rustic Borer, we believe

Rustic Borer, we believe

Dear SDub,
We believe this Longhorned Borer Beetle is a Rustic Borer,
Xylotrechus colonus, based on images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae develop in virtually all eastern hardwoods, especially Carya, Fagus, and also Pinus.”  BugGuide also notes:  “prefers recently killed trees” and “comes to lights; one of the commonest eastern creambycids [sic].”  Perhaps it came into the house with firewood and the warm indoor temperature caused it to emerge early.