Subject: Prionus Californicus in Tennessee?
Location: White County, Tennessee
June 20, 2016 11:10 am
I photographed this creature on my porch rail last night and posted it on IG in order to get feedback. Two people suggested it was a Prionus Californicus and gave me references. I’m pretty sure it IS one but what is it doing in Tennessee? With all of our nursery stock, I wonder if they’re plentiful here, have they been here a long while, how WE have come to have them, and are our nurserymen aware of them? I’m from Warren County, but this bug was found up at our river front property in Neighboring White County.
Thanks so much!
Signature: Peggy S Thompson

Tile Horned Prionus

Tile Horned Prionus

Dear Peggy,
This is indeed
Prionus, but it is NOT P. californicus.  In scientific nomenclature, the capitalized first word in the binomial name is the genus, and the second lower case word is the species.  The members of the genus are closely related and often share physical attributes, and frequently they can be difficult to distinguish from one another.  According to BugGuide, there are 16 North American species in the genus, and Prionus californicus is found as far east as Texas, according to BugGuide.  Your relative is the Tile Horned Prionus, Prionus imbricornis, and its range is according to BugGuide, partially overlaps that of the California Root Borer, and includes Tennessee.  The impressive antennae on your individual indicates he is a male.  This is the third Tile Horned Prionus we have posted this week, though the first was a disembodied head.   

Daniel,
Thanks so much for such a quick reply, ID, and also for posting my “Tile Horned Prionus” online for others to see. I had several people interested in him and his “Yosamitty Sam” antennas! Now WE know him…
Peggy T.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetle in Vail, AZ
Location: Vail, AZ
June 20, 2016 9:05 am
Can you help I’d this beetle?
Signature: Cindy

Giant Mesquite Bug Nymphs

Giant Mesquite Bug Nymphs

Dear Cindy,
These are NOT beetles.  They are immature Giant Mesquite Bugs,
Thasus neocalifornicus, and according to BugGuide, they feed on:  “The green pods of Mesquite (Prosopis spp.), notably the non-native P. velutina (Chilean, Velvet Mesquite) and the native P. glandulosa (Honey Mesquite).”

Subject: Strange beetle with feather-like antennae.
Location: Tallahassee, FL
June 20, 2016 7:31 am
Hello,
My father ran across this beetle n June 19th is Tallahassee, FL and we were wondering what kind it might be.
Signature: David Robinson

Tile Horned Prionus

Tile Horned Prionus

Hi David,
Now that summer is upon us, we are beginning to receive submissions of Root Borers from the genus
Prionus as well as other large Prionids.  There are different species from different parts of the country, and your individual is a male Tile Horned Prionus, Prionus imbricornis.  The species is described on BugGuide as:  “Huge longhorn, dark brown and shining. Antennae have 18-20 overlapping segments (male):  Female has 16-18 serrated segments. Other eastern Prionus have 12-13 antennal segments.”  Earlier in the week we posted this arresting image of the decapitated head of a male Tile Horned Prionus.

Tile Horned Prionus

Tile Horned Prionus

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of spider is this
Location: Upstate, NY
June 20, 2016 5:48 am
This was found near friends house in Binghamton, NY. Could you please tell me what type of spider it us and if it is poisonous? Could you tell me a little about the spider?
Signature: Marcus

Fishing Spider

Fishing Spider

Dear Marcus,
This is a Fishing Spider in the genus
Dolomedes, and they are generally found not far from water.  They are also called Dock Spiders.  Fishing Spiders are not aggressive and they are not considered dangerous to humans.  Female Fishing Spiders exhibit strong maternal behavior.

Subject: Unknown Flying Insect
Location: Reseda, Ca
June 19, 2016 8:52 pm
Hi, there are flying beetle like bugs that are eating a tree in our backyard. My dad started to notice them this year and doesn’t remember seeing then before. Please help!
Signature: Won Cho

Glassy Winged Sharpshooters

Glassy Winged Sharpshooters

Dear Won Cho,
You have two different insects here, in different orders.  Two of them are Glassy Winged Sharpshooters that feed by sucking fluids from plants, and they do the most damage to new shoots.  According to BugGuide:  “A major vector of Pierce’s disease on grape. Usually not a serious pest within its native range, southeastern US. This species was accidentally introduced into so. California in the early 1990s, probably with ornamental or agricultural stock. There, it has become a serious threat to viticulture.  The biggest problem is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.”  According to the University of California Integrated Pest Management System site:  “The real problem associated with glassy-winged sharpshooter, however, is that it can spread the disease-causing bacterium Xylella fastidiosa from one plant to another. This bacterium is the causal agent of devastating plant diseases such as Pierce’s disease of grape, oleander leaf scorch, almond leaf scorch and mulberry leaf scorch. Other diseases to landscape plants in California include sweet gum dieback and cherry plum leaf scorch. Outside of California, other strains of X. fastidiosa cause phony peach disease, plum leaf scald, leaf scorches in sycamore, elm, maple, and oak,and variegated citrus chlorosis, but these diseases have not been detected in California. It should be noted that the strain of X. fastidiosa that causes oleander leaf scorch will not cause Pierce’s disease in grapes and the strain of X. fastidiosa that causes mulberry leaf scorch does not cause disease in oleanders or grapes. At this time there is no cure for any of these diseases.”  The other insect we can only identify to the family.  It is a Metallic Borer Beetle in the family Buprestidae, and the larvae bore in the wood.  They are generally very host specific.  Telling us what tree is affected may help in further identifications.

Borer Beetle

Borer Beetle

Subject: never seen before bug
Location: Laval North west subburbs, Quebec
June 20, 2016 5:45 am
Hello Here is a photo of a winged insect that is very beautiful but we never seen any of them before.
Signature: Richard

Male Spring Fishfly

Male Spring Fishfly

Dear Richard,
This is a male Spring Fishfly,
Chauliodes rastricornis, which you can verify by comparing to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “The antennae of females are serrate (saw-like):  The comb-like, (pectinate) antennae of the males are quite obvious.”  BugGuide data indicates Quebec sightings occur in June and July.

Thank you
I and will go to sleep a little smarter.
Love that guide will start using it more and more
Site is a bit intimidating with its large content I will get familiar.
Is there a way to arrive at an identification beside looking at all the items ? like a series of questions that would narrow the search?
Thanks again
Richard

The search engine on our site might be helpful if you type in a few key words.  Because people send in letters that we post verbatim, there is pop culture language on the site that is used to describe the insects.  Prior to the advent of cellular telephones with cameras and internet connectivity, the letters were a bit wordier because they were typed on a computer.  We just typed in “beautiful winged insect” and your posting came up early, but Giant Conifer Aphids also came up, but not because they were described as beautiful, but because the tree they were living on was described as “beautiful and expensive.”