Subject:  What is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Caribbean side of Costa Rica
Date: 02/15/2018
Time: 09:18 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This bug is about an inch and a half long. The body is orange-ish.  It came out at night but was still here in the morning.
How you want your letter signed:  Sherry Lidstone

Male Timber Fly

Dear Sherry,
This is one beautiful fly, and the large eyes indicate it is a male Fly.  Our best guess is that it might be a male Horse Fly, but we have never seen any images of Horse Flies with such unusual markings.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to assist us with a proper identification.

Thanks to Cesar Crash, we now know that this is a male Timber Fly in the family Pantophthalmidae.  We have images of a female Timber Fly in our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider found on car in Asia
Geographic location of the bug:  Singapore
Date: 02/15/2018
Time: 03:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi I found this spider on my car today afternoon and I’ve never seen anything like this. It jumps pretty well! Pls let me know what this spider is, and is it poisonous?
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks, much appreciated!

Jumping Spider

This is a Jumping Spider in the family Salticidae.  We did not identify the species, but we found a matching image, also from Singapore, on FlickR.

Oh yes, indeed it is! Ok let me find out more on this spider species.  I tried to look for matching images on the web but didn’t manage to find any…
Thank you so much!
Regards
HueyFang

Subject:  What is this?!
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Florida
Date: 02/16/2018
Time: 11:54 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I found a bunch of these in my greenhouse recently, some had shed their wings, and others had not yet. Some were actually on top of the soil in some of the plants, but mostly dead on the ground around them. What could it be?
How you want your letter signed:  LBY

Termite Alates

Dear LBY,
These are Termite Alates, the winged reproductive individuals that swarm, mate and shed their wings before beginning a new colony.

Thank you!!
Uh oh…. looks like ive got termites! Nooooo (cries)

Thank you for your response!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Which insect it is?
Geographic location of the bug:  India
Date: 02/15/2018
Time: 12:28 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Sir, i found this insect in my balcony . Will you please help me out with this insect?
How you want your letter signed:  An uncanny arthropod

Lanternfly

This is some species of Lanternfly, and we believe it is Kalidasa lanata based on this Project Noah image.

Subject:  Large spider on a palm trunk
Geographic location of the bug:  Macas, Ecuador (Ecuadorian Amazon)
Date: 02/14/2018
Time: 08:29 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We came across this while hiking in the jungle.  Wasn’t able to find a name for it, but the local person we were with suggested it could jump.
How you want your letter signed:  Mike Edgerton

Wandering Spider, we believe

Dear Mike,
This is really an interesting Spider, but other than to say it appears to be a hunting spider that does not build a web to entrap prey, we aren’t sure about its identity.  Many hunting spiders can jump quite well.  It looks very much like the spider in a posting in our archives, also from Ecuador, that we identified as possibly a Wandering Spider in the genus
Phoneutria, a venomous and potentially dangerous genus.  The spotted legs on your individual look like the spotted legs on an individual in an image on Wikipedia of a Wandering Spider in the genus Phoneutria.  There are many images of Brazilian Wandering Spiders on Primal Shutter and we believe that might be a correct identification for your individual.

Thank you for the information.  After reading more about the spider, I’m glad it didn’t jump!
Mike

Subject: Insect I.D Needed
Geographic location of the bug:  Chiangmai Province, Thailand
Date: 02/14/2018
Time: 04:04 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello Bugman,
I found this insect walking along some gravel on the side of the road.  It appeared to be injured and it could not fly.  Could you please help me identify this species.
Sincerely,
How you want your letter signed:  Myles Davis

Tiger Moth: Amata sperbius

Dear Myles,
This beautiful wasp-mimic, diurnal Tiger Moth is
Amata sperbius based on the resemblance of your individual to those pictured on iNaturalist and on FlickR.  Perhaps it is recently eclosed and its wings are not yet capable of flight.