Subject:  Carting off a big prize
Geographic location of the bug:  Southwest Ohio
Date: 06/20/2019
Time: 01:40 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was gardening when I noticed a little spider being dragged through the grass.   I thought at first that an ant was bringing it home, but maybe not.  It was making all sorts of enthusiastic abdominal movements I assumed were pheromone deposits.   Definitely had wings and a more fly-like face.   Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Kitsa

Spider Wasp and Crab Spider

Dear Kitsa,
The predator in your images is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and the prey is a Crab Spider, probably a Flower Spider,
Misumena vatia.  The Spider Wasp will not be eating the Crab Spider.  Rather, the Spider Wasp will place the paralyzed Crab Spider in an underground burrow so that the larval Spider Wasp will have a fresh source of food.  The pattern on the wings of the Spider Wasp are rather distinctive, and it appears that it might be Dipogon calipterus which is pictured on BugGuide.

Spider Wasp and Crab Spider

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Need help identifying insect
Geographic location of the bug:  North Carolina
Date: 06/20/2019
Time: 10:07 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this insect on my car and i have no idea what kind it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Ginellie

Big Legged Bug Nymph

Dear Ginellie,
This is an immature True Bug in the family Coreidae, commonly called the Leaf Footed Bugs or Big Legged Bugs.  Based on this BugGuide image, we believe it is a first instar Big Legged Bug nymph in the genus
Acanthocephala, meaning that it has just recently hatched.  Later instar nymphs turn bluish-gray.

Subject:  Don’t know what this bug is
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Florida
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 12:32 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just really curious as to what this bug is. Couldn’t find anything online
How you want your letter signed:  Ty

Hanging Thief

Dear Ty,
This is a Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, commonly called a Hanging Thief because this predator often hangs from one leg while eating its prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Strange debris covered creature
Geographic location of the bug:  Cyprus
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 04:13 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this moving across my shoe. It stops when prodded. I’d love to know what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Jelvis

Bagworm

Dear Jelvis,
We cannot make out any details in the creature that is hiding in this shelter, but we suspect it is a Bagworm, the larva of a moth in the family Psychidae.  According to BugGuide, a North American website:  “Larvae (bagworms) construct elaborate little cases around themselves of plant debris and other organic matter.”  This particular individual appears to have constructed its bag from pink flower petals.  Was there a plant with similar looking blossoms nearby?  Based on this FlickR image, there are Bagworms on Cyprus.

Hi Daniel
Thank you for your reply. Yes there is a Bougainvillea nearby so his cocoon was quite colourful. He poked his head out and it looks like the Bagworm.
Thanks again.
Jelvis

Subject:  Sphinx leucopheata caterpillar by Prema
Geographic location of the bug:  Lago Atitlán
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 05:01 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Prema, dear Daniel,
Many Thanks for Your nice replies. – I am attaching my sketch of this caterpillar type on the plant leaves from 2016; maybe they are similar to those of the plant on (resp. under) which You found Your caterpillar; maybe an ash species (Fraxinus, Oleaceae) or a Bignoniaceae-member like Tecoma stans (with plenty of yellow tubular blossoms), a tree from the Trumpet-tree-family.  Thank You again for sharing, and have a great celebration!
Best from Berlin,
Bostjan
How you want your letter signed:  Dr. Bostjan Dvorak

Sketch of Sphinx leucopheata by Dr. Bostjan Dvorak

Dear Bostjan,
Thanks so much for providing us with your sketch of this rare Hornworm.  Daniel adjusted the levels to saturate the image a bit to improve its appearance on the internet.  Thanks again for your assistance in identifying Prema’s Hornworm from Guatemala as
Sphinx leucopheata.

Sphinx leucopheata image by Prema

Subject:  What’s this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Virginia
Date: 06/19/2019
Time: 08:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Do you know what bug this is? Found in Virginia on a dead tree stump.
How you want your letter signed:  Renny

Six Banded Longhorn

Dear Renny,
This is a very exciting sighting for us.  Thanks to images posted to BugGuide, we are confident your gorgeous beetle is a Six Banded Longhorn,
Dryobius sexnotatus.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is:  “Old growth hardwood forests; mostly in large, very old deteriorating sugar maple trees that have been wounded/scarred; adults hide under bark. In PA, all of the sugar maples observed were very old and at least 3 ft across. Most sites are located in stream valleys.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Uncommon/rare; widely scattered, populations are sparse; listed as rare or threatened by several states, e.g. considered a SGCN [Species of Greatest Conservation Need] by AR, LA, and VA Dury (1902) noted that D. sexnotatus was once abundant but was even then becoming rare.  Perry et al. (1974) noted a sharp decline in the collection since 1942.”