Subject:  Maybe Cosmosoma but which species?
Geographic location of the bug:  Costa Rica (Paraiso Quetzal Lodge)
Date: 02/13/2020
Time: 07:47 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We saw this bug in Costa Rica near the Paraiso Quetzal Lodge in February. I think it’s a Cosmosoma but I didn’t find the species. Looks like this one: http://www.zonacharrua.com/butterflies/Andes-Cosmosomanrsubflamma.htm
But I’m not sure it’s possible to have a subflamma in Costa Rica.
How you want your letter signed:  JdA

Wasp Moth: Homoeocera gigantea

Dear JdA,
While you are correct that this is a Wasp Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, we do not believe you have the correct genus.  We believe based on images posted to Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute that this is
Homoeocera gigantea.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Id spider please
Geographic location of the bug:  Panama, western highlands 5400 ft
Date: 02/10/2020
Time: 11:26 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi – help id this spider who was staying still on the floor of my house in western panama highlands. About 2+ inches as in pic
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy S

Flattie, NOT Giant Crab Spider

Dear Nancy,
This is a harmless Giant Crab Spider in the family Sparassidae.  Here is an image from Flickr of a Giant Crab Spider from Panama.  We are uncertain of your species.  Giant Crab Spiders are nocturnal and they do not spin a web to snare prey.  They hunt.

Correction Courtesy of Cesar Crash: 
I think it’s a flattie, Selenops sp.

Ed. Note:  See images of a Flattie from Costa Rica on Quaoar Power Zoo.

Subject:  Beautiful assassin
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Utah
Date: 02/08/2020
Time: 07:20 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this beauty in my garage and looking for second opinions as to the ID.
How you want your letter signed:  Jason

Assassin Bug:  Fitchia spinosula

Dear Jason,
We believe we have correctly identified your Assassin Bug as
Fitchia spinosula based on this BugGuide image.  Because it does not have developed wings, we originally thought this was an immature individual, but according to BugGuide:  “Micropterous individuals are more common, although macropterous forms do exist. Macroptery is more common in males than females.”  According to Merriam-Webster, micropterous means “having small or rudimentary wings.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug found on inca trail
Geographic location of the bug:  Valle sagrado, Peru
Date: 02/06/2020
Time: 05:09 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey bug man! Found this interesting looking creature walking across the path! It has some pretty cool Armour!
How you want your letter signed:  Matt

Firefly (or Net-Winged Beetle) Larva

Dear Matt,
This is a Beetle Larva in one of two families.  Our first choice is a Firefly Larva in the family Lampyridae, but we would not discount that it might be a Net-Winged Beetle Larva in the family Lycidae.  Larvae from the two families are difficult to differentiate from one another.

Subject:  Unknown insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Ottawa Ontario Canada
Date: 02/06/2020
Time: 12:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Not sure if these are thrips or aphids? any help identifying and eradicating these would be appreciated. This is my third indoor crop over winter that has been infested over this winter so far 🙁
Thank you very much!
Dave
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you

Aphids on Cannabis

Dear Dave,
These appear to be Aphids, and they appear to be on a
Cannabis leaflet, so we are assuming you are growing Marijuana indoors.  This article on Canna Connection might have some helpful information for you as does Royal Queen Seeds.  Because female Aphids are able to give birth asexually, they do not require mating and populations of Aphids can increase quite rapidly.  Indoor growing has its own set of challenges, and keeping plants pest-free is often difficult.

Excellent! Thank you so much for the references.. I’ll do my best to eradicate these tiny pests.. you’ve been most helpful!
Take good care my friend!
Dave

Subject:  What is this found in clarinda
Geographic location of the bug:  Clarinda victoria
Date: 02/04/2020
Time: 07:33 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My wife found this at the park. Never seen it before in my life. What on earth is it?
How you want your letter signed:  Mik

Unknown Robber Fly

Dear Mik,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  There are many species pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.