Subject:  Hungarian Butterflies
Geographic location of the bug:  Hungary May 2018
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 03:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there!
I have sent a few of my butterfly pictures to you in the past and I thought you might like a couple more for your site from a trip I made to Hungary earlier this year. The first is a Common Glider, the second is a Scarce Swallowtail
How you want your letter signed:  Butterfly watcher

Common Glider

Dear Butterfly watcher,
We split your submission into two distinct postings so that we could categorize your two butterflies, which are from different families, appropriately.  The Common Glider,
Neptis sappho, is, according to EuroButterflies:  “A delicate butterfly, gently glides through dappled light in woodland and along woodland edges” and its habitat is “Open woodland, clearings and woodland edges in dappled shade. Feeds on flowers, Euphorbias for example, and takes salts from mud” in “NE Italy and eastwards. Sporadic in the Balkans to north Greece. Double brooded in May/ June and July/ August.”  The common name is Pallas’ Sailer according to iNaturalist.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Hungarian Butterflies
Geographic location of the bug:  Hungary May 2018
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 03:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello there!
I have sent a few of my butterfly pictures to you in the past and I thought you might like a couple more for your site from a trip I made to Hungary earlier this year. The first is a Common Glider, the second is a Scarce Swallowtail
How you want your letter signed:  Butterfly watcher

Scarce Swallowtail

Dear Butterfly watcher,
Thank you so much for clarifying the date of this sighting, which differs considerably from your submission date.  The Scarce Swallowtail,
Iphiclides podalirius, is a new species for our site.  According to Learn about Butterflies:  “Iphiclides podalirius is distributed across most of central and southern Europe, excluding the British Isles, Ireland and Fennoscandia.
Its common name Scarce Swallowtail refers to the fact that it has on extremely rare occasions been recorded in Britain, e.g. in 1895 two specimens were captured, one in Devon and the other in Kent. These may however have been ‘fake’ captures, a practice common in the Victorian era when collectors would do almost anything to raise their status among their contemporaries. There is no evidence that the species was ever a resident or regular migrant to the British Isles.
In Europe the butterfly is widespread and fairly common, although it has become much scarcer in recent years as a result of the removal of blackthorn bushes and hedges.”  The site also states:  “Both sexes are usually encountered singly. Males visit seepages and patches of damp soil where they imbibe mineralised moisture. At such times they keep their wings firmly closed.  Females are more often seen nectaring at the flowers of trees and bushes including apple, pear, cherry, lilac and Buddleia, but also visit herbaceous plants including valerian, bugle, thistles, knapweeds, ragwort and stonecrop. When nectaring the wings are usually held at a 45° angle.”  It is also pictured on UK Butterflies.

Subject:  Identity
Geographic location of the bug:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 06:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Is this katydid nymph? (on Cannabis leaf).
How you want your letter signed:  Mel Frank

Leafhopper Assassin Bug nymph

Hi Mel,
This is much better than a Katydid nymph.  It is a predatory Assassin Bug nymph, and we identified it as a Leafhopper Assassin Bug nymph,
Zelus renardii, thanks to these images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Generalist predator (despite its common name suggesting host specificity).”  It is also pictured on the Natural History of Orange County site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Tiny bee
Geographic location of the bug:  Billings MT
Date: 08/14/2018
Time: 06:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Green head and abdomen, iridescent orange thorax, size of a small grain of rice.  I was totally fascinated by this insect.  It was foraging on a sunflower leaf.  As it was walking away, it’s thorax shone like a high beam orange light!  Unfortunately the glowing photo was a blurry but gives you an idea of the orange glow I was seeing.
How you want your letter signed:  Lisa Gerard

Cuckoo Wasp: Pseudomalus auratus

Dear Lisa,
What a beautiful little gem you have discovered, but it is a Cuckoo Wasp, not a Bee.  Thanks to this and other images on BugGuide, we identified your Cuckoo Wasp as
Pseudomalus auratus.  According to BugGuide:  “native to, and widespread in the Palaearctic, introduced in NA (e. US, UT, CA…)” and “‘The wasp oviposits inside the aphids but it gets more complicated. The aphid with a chrysidid egg inside must be captured by crabronid wasp and taken to its nest. Some crabronids hunt aphids for food provision to their offspring. Later, inside crabronid wasp’s nest the chrysidid egg will hatch, kill crabronid larva and consume the food provision (aphids). This is how chrysidid gets her egg inside the crabronid wasp nest without risking entering to the nest herself.’ (Villu Soon, 11.vii.2017).”  It is also pictured on Bees, Wasps & Ants Recording Society and on Bug Eric,where it states:  “Larvae of this wasp are kleptoparasites in the nests of other solitary wasps, and solitary bees, that nest inside hollow twigs, pre-existing cavities in wood, and similar situations.  Known hosts include the smaller wasps in the family Crabrionidae, and bees in the genera Ceratina (small carpenter bees, family Apidae), Hylaeus (masked bees, family Colletidae), and Anthidium (wool-carder or cotton bees, family Megachilidae).  The cuckoo wasp grub feeds on the provisions stored by the mother of the host larva.  They literally steal the meal provided by the host for its offspring.”

Cuckoo Wasp: Pseudomalus auratus

Subject:  What caterpillar is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Tucson, AZ
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 12:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please tell me what kind of Caterpillar this is?  It is on top of my buckhorn cholla  plant.
How you want your letter signed:  Maureen C.

Staghorn Cholla Moth Caterpillar

Dear Maureen,
Thanks so much for letting us know you found this Caterpillar on a buckhorn cholla.  Often knowing the food plant upon which an insect is found is of tremendous help in making an identification, and it only took us about a minute to find this BugGuide image of a Staghorn Cholla Moth Caterpillar,
Euscirrhopterus cosyra.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed externally on cactus, rather than boring inside like many other cactus-feeders.”

Thank you Daniel! I would have never figured this out. I’m new to Arizona and have never seen anything like this.
It is a fascinating looking caterpillar! Thank you again for your help.
Maureen

Subject:  Please identify this green bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Gun Flint Trail in Northern Minnesota
Date: 08/15/2018
Time: 03:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was standing on a dock by a lake for just a few minutes and after I got back in the car I felt something crawling in my hair. I found this green bug. He crawled but I never saw him fly so I am not sure if he could or not. I took this picture of it before letting it go back outside.
How you want your letter signed:  Jayne Pietsch

Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil

Dear Jayne,
As you can see from this BugGuide image, you encountered a Green Immigrant Leaf Weevil,
Polydrusus formosus.  According to BugGuide:  “native to Europe (widespread there), adventive in NA, established in the northeast” and it feed on “primarily Yellow Birch.”