Subject: What’s that bug
Location: Columbus, OH
June 18, 2016 10:01 pm
Thank you for taking your time. I have a found a few bugs in my house and just want a professionals opinion on what they are. We both work in healthcare so bedbugs are a widespread concern.
Signature: Thank you, James

Unknown Beetle

Tumbling Flower Beetle

Dear James,
This is NOT a Bedbug, but we are not certain of its actual identity.  We presume it is very tiny.  We believe it is a beetle, and its long hind legs are quite curious.  Does it jump?  Our best guess is that it might be a Tumbling Flower Beetle in the family Mordellidae, and it looks the most like members of the Tribe Conaliini that are pictured on BugGuide.  It might also be a Flea Beetle with it most resembling the members of the Longitarsus Genus Group on BugGuide.  Why either of those two possibilities would be found in the home is most puzzling, which makes us speculate that this is either a small wood boring beetle or some species of food infesting beetle.  We will try to get Eric Eaton’s opinion.

Unknown Beetle

Tumbling Flower Beetle

Eric Eaton confirms Tumbling Flower Beetle
Daniel:
It is a tumbling flower beetle.  It could have flown into the house (they fly very well), or maybe come indoors on cut flowers or some other object.
Eric

Thank you for your quick reply. I assumed it was not a bed bug but would rather be safe than sorry. I then thought it was a flea from its hind legs, but I saw what looks like wings (or maybe just a split like a beetle on its back). They are tearing down a large forest near our house and have since gotten many different critters, bugs and snakes. Not to mention we have always been fighting lady bugs (or German beetles).
We have very little of a garden and if the only concern is flowers than I won’t treat. I guess my main concern is if it needs to be treated in regards to humans as I do have four kids.
They are very tiny. About the size of an adult flea. Which caused me concern as I do not look forward to treating for fleas. So I am hoping you can rule those out.
If there is anything I can do to help identify them, please let me know as you are doing me a huge favor.
James

Unknown Beetle

Tumbling Flower Beetle

Hi again James.
This is NOT a Flea.  Eric Eaton has confirmed that it is a Tumbling Flower Beetle, an outdoor species that somehow wandered into your home.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown insect
Location: Bay Area, California
June 14, 2016 2:45 pm
Hello,
Love this site and use it often! I got this photo from a co-worker and couldn’t identify it with my books or your posts. It was found on a backpack in early June. Is it some kind of horntail larvae?
I think you are out in the field, I look forward to your answer when you return. Thanks for your time!
Signature: Jess
Resource Analyst  | Stewardship
East Bay Regional Park District
Oakland, CA

Unknown Larva

Probably Longtailed Sawfly Larva

Dear Jess,
Thanks for your patience, though we received so much mail while we were away that we will never be able to respond to everything.  This looks nothing like the drawing of a Horntail larva pictured on Bug Eric.  It appears to have an ovipositor, and we are not aware of any larvae that possess an ovipositor.  Like you, we are stumped.  We will write to Eric Eaton to see if he can provide an identification.  For now, we will classify it as a Beetle Grub, but we are not convinced that this the appropriate classification.

Eric Eaton responds
Reminds me of a rat-tailed maggot, except those don’t have legs, which this one clearly does, plus a head capsule….I’m stumped, too.
Eric

Update:  As we await additional information from Jess, we are featuring this posting and requesting assistance from our readership.
Dear Jess, please provide us with any additional information, like size.  Also, was this discovery made on a backpack in the field, or was it shortly after an excursion?

Hello Daniel,
Thanks so much for your time on this! My co-worker is off at a conference, and didn’t provide a size. However, using his photograph of the backpack(see the blurry strap?);  it looks to be about 2.5-3 stitches long. I measured the reinforced stitches on my backpack and got approx. 8-10mm. When I first saw it and said it looked like a cricket larva, he said it was “a small cricket-size”. After review of cricket larva (no ovipositor) and rat-tailed maggots, I emailed. Maybe a female after a molt? But no wings….
He was out in the field, likely a grassland in one of our parks: Alameda or Contra Costa Counties of the East Bay.
Thanks to Eric for his time too.
I hope this helps,
Jess

Thanks for the information Jess,
Now that this request is back in our consciousness, we had a thought.  It reminds us of a Sawfly Larva, especially some Australian Sawflies, and sure enough, we found a Longtailed Sawfly in our archives that looks nearly exactly like your image.  Here is another image from the Australian Museum.  Now our mission is to see if any North American Sawflies have the long tail or if this might perhaps be an Australian introduction, a direction in which we are leaning as there are so many eucalyptus trees and other Australian fauna already naturalized in Southern California.  Now, going back to your original request, you suggested a Horntail Larva, and interestingly, Horntails and Sawflies are classified together as Symphyta which you may verify on BugGuide.

Subject: Moth ID
Location: Michigan
June 13, 2016 11:32 am
I am having issues id’ing this moth. We found them in upper Michigan in the pine barrens where the Kirtland’s warbler nests. I have narrowed it down to a possible black-banded orange (Epelis truncartaria)
Signature: Glenn

Black Banded Orange

Black Banded Orange

Dear Glenn,
In our opinion your identification is absolutely correct, after we compared your image to this image of a Black Banded Orange,
Epelis truncataria, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults fly during the day and are not known to be active at night.  Generally uncommon and local in the southern parts of its range; common and widespread across the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beach Beetle
Location: Plum Island, Massachusetts
June 13, 2016 1:17 pm
Dear Bugman,
We were on a class field trip to the beach and came across this golden guy. Any idea what he (or she) is?
Signature: Curious kids from AMS

Goldsmith Beetle

Goldsmith Beetle

Dear Curious kids from AMS,
Our response is delayed as we were away from the office when you submitted your request.  This is a Goldsmith Beetle,
Cotalpa lanigera, and it appears to have experienced some trauma.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults feed on foliage of oak, poplar, hickory, pear, maple, cottonwood, willow and sweetgum.”   As you are in Massachusetts, you may be interested in knowing that this is allegedly the insect that inspired Edgar Allen Poe’s classic short story “The Gold Bug.”

Subject: Large brown beetle
Location: Linton, North Dakota
June 18, 2016 9:45 pm
Linton ND June 18, 2016 10pm. Large brown beetle close to a shop light laying on the ground.
I’ve never seen a beetle this large in ND before. I’m just wondering what it was. It was about 1.5″ long with fuzzy “feelers” that were about an inch long each.
Signature: Eric Jensen

Prionus fissicornis

Prionus fissicornis

Dear Eric,
This is one of the Root Borers in the genus Prionus, and though we have countless examples on our site, we are thrilled that we have identified your individual on BugGuide as Prionus fissicornis because it has so many segments on its antennae.  According to BugGuide:  “ant[ennae] w/ at least 25 antennomeres (‘antennal segments’), often over 30.”  Your individual is a male.  BugGuide also notes:  “Larvae are root feeders on grasses” and “Adults active May-July.”  Beetles in the Bush has an entertaining account on this species.  Your submission represents a new species for our site.

I’ll try to get a better picture of one for you with our 35mm camera. It should be way clearer than the first picture I sent.
Thank you very much for replying. I appreciate it!
ERIC JENSEN

Subject: Cool Bug
Location: Ottawa, Ohio
June 18, 2016 7:02 pm
Hoping someone can identify this really cool looking insect.
Signature: Not sure

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

This spectacular insect is a male Dobsonfly, and it is one of our most common summer identification requests.  Despite his formidable looking mandibles, the male Dobsonfly cannot bite and is perfectly harmless, though his mate who has considerably shorter mandibles can deliver a somewhat painful bite that could even draw blood, though she too is considered harmless as she has no poison nor venom.