Subject: Lawn Shrimp
Location: Castle Hayne, NC
August 3, 2016 7:01 am
I found these little creatures in our pet’s water bowl yesterday and googled what they might be, your site gave me the answer and now I’m letting you know they are also just outside of Wilmington, NC!
Signature: Becky H.

Lawn Shrimp

Lawn Shrimp

Dear Becky,
Thanks so much for reporting this North Carolina sighting.  Lawn Shrimp are an introduced species from Australia that are well established in California, and BugGuide indicates they are also found in Florida, though the data on the site indicates Georgia reports.  This North Carolina sighting cannot be considered a normal range expansion as this is an introduced species, but there is no telling how far North they will be able to survive in North America.  We have already reported Lawn Shrimp in South Carolina.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider with yellow triangle
Location: Woods/ around house, Junior, West Virginia
August 3, 2016 6:11 pm
This was hanging form my AC outside my window. As long as it won’t kill me it can stay. Let me please
Signature: Jennifer

Arrowhead Spider

Arrowhead Spider

Dear Jennifer,
The Arrowhead Spider,
Verrucosa arenata, is a harmless species.  You may verify that on BugGuide where it states:  “Like other orb weavers, it is not dangerous to humans.”  Can you please provide a state or city for the location?

Subject: What kind of moth is this
Location: Cypress,TX
August 3, 2016 7:23 pm
We found a large moth (5″ across) on the edge of our pool on Aug 2 in Cypress TX. Reddish brown with eyespots, some black on the lower wings. Think it layed eggs on the edge of the pool. Was gone by dark. It was really gorgeous. Can you tell me what kind of moth it was? I can send a picture.
Signature: Cheryl Claybough

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Cheryl,
This lovely moth is a Polyphemus Moth.

Thanks so much for the quick response.  We just moved to the Houston area and this was the first one I have seen. It stayed for quite awhile without moving right about the waterline of our pool.  Up close you could tell it had many of the same colors as our pool tiles.
Also I really appreciate your website.

The Polyphemus Moth has been reported from all 48 continental United States as well as across Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Asilidae feeling threatened by scent?
August 4, 2016 1:36 am
Just this morning, I went running down at Palo Duro Canyon in Canyon Texas.  The entire run (2.2 miles), I experienced aggressive behavior from Robber Flies (Asilidae). They literally preyed on me the entire run, consistently going for my legs and hair.
I can’t tell if the aggressive behavior was from me running or from the new Tea Tree shampoo that I just started using. I go on runs all the time in Palo Duro and never before have experienced this. Perhaps the behavior wasn’t aggressive, still this is new territory.
My real question is, has all this branched out from me switching to this new shampoo? I look forward to hearing back from y’all.
Signature: Samuel  Tenny

Courting Belzebul Bee Eaters (from our archives)

Courting Belzebul Bee Eaters (from our archives)

Dear Samuel,
We wish you had sent an image to illustrate your query as it would make our response more definitive.  Lacking an image, we have taken an image from our archives of Courting Belzebul Bee Eaters,
Mallophora leschenaulti, a large species of Robber Fly found in Texas, to illustrate the posting.  Texas has many large, predatory Robber Flies and we could easily have chosen the magnificent Heteropogon patruelis, also from our archives, as the illustration.  Robber Flies do not normally exhibit aggressive behavior towards humans, so we have our doubts that members of the family Asilidae are the culprits.  We would tend to favor blood-sucking Horse Flies, which can also get quite large, and which may have not had any nearby livestock or deer upon which to feed, causing them to turn their attention to the nearest large, warm-blooded meal they encountered, namely you.  We say this from experience since our editorial staff was chased by large Horse Flies back in our youth in Ohio, and they even landed on the hood and windshield of the car once we had taken shelter.  Please look at some images of Horse Flies and get back to us if you think our suspicions are correct.  With that said, chemicals in shampoo, as well as scents in colognes, perfumes and antiperspirants, have been reported to attract bees and wasps, so that is a distinct possibility that they might attract Robber Flies as well.  If the shampoo is the cause, we would also question why your aggressive flies were targeting your legs.

Subject: The Hebrew
Location: Troy, VA
August 3, 2016 9:19 am
I thought you might like this picture of what I believe to be a Hebrew moth. It’s not quite as sharp an image as I would like, but you can still see the lovely markings quite clearly. I only got one photo before she flew off.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

The Hebrew

The Hebrew

Dear Grace,
Your image of The Hebrew moth,
Polygrammate hebraeicum, is a marvelous addition to our archive as we only have one rather blurry image of The Hebrew in our archives that was submitted in 2005.  According to BugGuide:  “Both common name ‘The Hebrew’ and specific epithet hebraeicum likely refer to resemblance of the pattern to Hebrew characters”  According to the Butterflies and Moths of North America:  “Caterpillar Hosts: Black gum trees.”

Subject: Scorpion fly female?
Location: South central Virginia
August 2, 2016 6:35 pm
Hi, I took a photo of this pretty insect and was trying to identify it. I think it might be a scorpion fly female. I’m in south central Virginia. Thank you!
Signature: Nina Eagle

Spotted-Winged Antlion

Spotted-Winged Antlion

Dear Nina,
This is not a Scorpionfly, but we do acknowledge some visual similarities between Scorpionflies and this Spotted-Winged Antlion,
Dendroleon obsoletus, which we identified on BugGuide where they are described as”Large, with black circular spots on wings–distinctive in much of range. Antennae slightly clubbed, with pointed tips, often (or always?) pinkish in the middle (based on photos in the guide).”  The pink in the antennae is especially prominent in your lovely image.  Antlions are classified along with Lacewings, Mantispids and Owlflies in the order Neuroptera, the Net Winged Insects.  Discover Life indicates the common name for the order as “‘nerve-wings’ or ‘nerve-winged insects'”, the name we have always preferred.  P.S.  If you click on the thumbnails in our links, you will get a new window with an enlarged image.