Subject: Land Shrimp?!
Location: La Habra Heights, CA
March 27, 2017 10:20 am
Hi,
We just recently moved into our new place and found these bugs crawling into our living room from the patio door and molting They moved very slow and when i try to catch one, it jumped up about 12 to 18 inches straight up. I lived in Southern California and never seen an insect like this. Can you help me identify this insect, thank you.
Signature: Jonathan

Lawn Shrimp

Dear Jonathan,
Commonly called a Lawn Shrimp or House Hopper, this terrestrial Amphipod is not an insect, but a Crustacean.  Lawn Shrimp are native to Australia, but they have naturalized in Southern California because of the irrigated gardens that are so common.

Daniel,
Thank you for identifying the critter.  My son was so excited when I read the email you had sent and how amazed he was how a shrimp can live in our yard.  Thank you and we will be visiting the site to identify all the insects and non insects we find in our backyard and vegetable garden.   I found your site to be very educational and entertaining, thank you!
Best Regards,
Jonathan Kim

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp mimic?
Location: Columbus, OH
March 27, 2017 7:41 am
Hello! This insect landed on me and I cannot for the life of me figure out what it is (my best guess is some sort of sawfly). This picture was taken on March 25th in central Ohio in an urban enviornment–I was actually about to get in my car when it was spotted. The weather was sunny and in the 70’s. I am especially perplexed by the super long antenna and the fact that the colored bands on the abdomen do not wrap all the way around. Thanks!
Signature: Intrigued

Ichneumon we believe

Dear Intrigued,
We are posting prior to doing any research as we are rushed right now, but we believe this is an Ichneumon, a member of a very large family of Parasitic Wasps, that are often recognized by long antennae.  Here is a similar looking Ichneumon in the genus
Banchus from BugGuide.

Ichneumon


Subject: Giant Moth in San Diego
Location: San Marcos, CA
March 26, 2017 10:54 am
My neighbor found this giant moth outside her door. It has 4 wings like a butterfly and I have scoured the internet to find it to no avail. A friend of mine believes it is a type of sphinx moth. But curiousity has me trying to figure this mystery out.
Signature: Michelle S

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Michelle,
This is a Ceanothus Silkmoth, and we have gotten several submissions this year from Southern California.  We suspect that the wetter winter led to more vegetation, and more food for caterpillars.  This will ensure better survival rates and more moth sightings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird little red dude
Location: Portland, oregon
March 25, 2017 6:47 pm
Hi,
I live in Portland Oregon and today I spotted this little dude outside trying to crawl into the garage. I’d say he was the size of a dime.
Can’t figure out what he is!
Signature: Sarah

Woodlouse Hunter

Dear Sarah,
This BugGuide image is nearly identical to your Woodlouse Hunter,
Dysdera crocata, is “The only member of the family in NA” according to BugGuide.  BugGuide also notes:  “Introduced to North America and widely distributed in the Neartic” and “Primary prey is isopods; hence the large chelicerae and fangs.”

Subject: Lady bug or mimic?
Location: Honolulu, HI
March 26, 2017 2:40 am
Hi.
My husband found this bug on our cribbage board and, after much reaearch, I can’t figure out what it is. I can’t find a single ladybug/bird that matches the color and spot pattern. I found the Anatis mali matched the spots, but the pattern and color of the pronotum doesn’t match.
Signature: Sierra

Ten Spotted Lady Beetle

Dear Sierra,
We believe we have correctly identified your Ten Spotted Lady Beetle,
Bothrocalvia pupillata, thanks to this posting on BugGuide.  The species is also pictured on iNaturalist and on Lady Beetles of Hawai’i.

 

Subject: Tiger Moth??
Location: Perth, WA
March 25, 2017 6:52 pm
Hello, I found this fluffy guy on my front porch in the Perth metropolitan area, Western Australia. It was found in April 2016. This was the only photo I managed before it flew away! I’ve been trying to find what kind of moth or family it belongs to since. The closest resemblance I can find is a Tiger Moth, what do you think? I would love to finally find out!
Signature: Lisa

Unknown Tiger Moth

Dear Lisa,
We agree with you that this is a Tiger Moth, but we have not had any luck identifying the species.  None of the species pictured on Butterfly House resemble your moth, nor did we find it on the Brisbane Insect site.  We will contact Tiger Moth expert Julian Donahue to see if he can provide an identification.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you! I have been searching for so long trying to find one similar, but haven’t had any luck. Your expertise is much appreciated!
Kind regards,

Julian Donahue provides some information and resources.
Hi Daniel,
Cool moth, and indeed a gravid female tiger moth. Not illustrated in Australian Moths Online http://www1.ala.org.au/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=9847
Another CSIRO site that you may find useful for all other groups of Australian insects: http://anic.ento.csiro.au/insectfamilies/
I suspect that it’s a melanic specimen, related to Creatonotos or “Diacrisia,” and may not be from Australia (or an accidental import).
For a modern, updated list of Arctiidae of the Oriental Region, Australia, and Oceania, with current names, check out: http://szmn.eco.nsc.ru/Arctiidae/ArctiinaeOriental.htm
The author, Vladimir V. Dubatolov, may be your best bet for identifying this animal.
For New World tiger moths, I’d suggest Dr. Chris Schmidt, an active worker in the field (Canadian National Collection, Ottawa)
Good luck,
Julian