Subject:  Meadow Katydid
Geographic location of the bug:  Chattanooga, TN
Date: 09/03/2018
Time: 11:17 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I believe this is a female Meadow Katydid but can’t tell which type.  Thoughts??
How you want your letter signed:  Myra Reneau

Handsome Meadow Katydid

Dear Myra,
Because of the blue eyes, we believe your Meadow Katydid is a Handsome Meadow Katydid,
Orchelimum pulchellum, which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Note white face with brownish to reddish mottling on edges, brown legs, diffuse turquoise stripe on upper sides back along wings. Eyes usually blue–fairly distinctive.”

Thank you very much for the idea. Feel free to use my photo if you would like to.
Myra

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Perth- western australia
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 02:56 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Bug was found in lawn when removing african beetles.
Is over 6mm in length.
Wondering what the beetle is and if it is destructive to plants or harmful to pets
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, Daniel Jones

Devil’s Coach Horse

Dear Daniel,
Because of its red head, this is an amazing looking Rove Beetle in the family Staphylinidae, and we identified it as
Creophilus erythrocephalus, commonly called a Devil’s Coach Horse, thanks to images on Wild South Australia.  According to Museums Victoria:  “Devil’s Coach Horses eat maggots (fly larvae) and are usually found living in rotting animal carcasses.”  While that might seem unsavory, we would consider them beneficial as they help to control Fly populations.  The species is also pictured on Atlas of Living Australia.  The common name Devil’s Coach Horse is also used with a European species of Rove Beetle that has naturalized in North America.  This Devil’s Coach Horse does not look like it died of natural causes, so we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage.

Devil’s Coach Horse

Subject:  Santa Barbara Bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Barbara CA
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 11:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This guy crawled into our house today.  Can’t figure out what it is! Any thought what it might be? Thank you!
How you want your letter signed:  Alison

Male Mexican Bush Katydid

Dear Alison,
This is a male Bush Katydid in the genus
Scudderia, and we believe it is the Mexican Bush Katydid, Scudderia mexicana because BugGuide states: “The only Scudderia species found in Los Angeles” with the further elaboration that it “Displaces S. furcata in its southwestern range, and overlaps range in California north from about Monterey County.”  Here is a BugGuide image for comparison.  Like other Katydids, the males are able to make sounds to attract a mate and they are among the chorus of insects that fill the warm summer evenings with sounds.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Argiope bruennichi?
Geographic location of the bug:  São Brás, Algarve, Portugal
Date: 09/01/2018
Time: 07:46 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
We spotted this spider on the wall outside the door of a villa we were staying in, in the Algarve in Portugal – a very remote location surrounded by nothing but olive groves and hills, accessible only by a dirt road. It appeared quite suddenly in the morning, as we were leaving, and we hadn’t noticed it before anywhere inside or outside during our week-long stay. We’ve never seen a spider like this in Portugal before (usually just lots of lizards and the odd snake!), especially not with  an almost crab-like body and a nest/egg sac? A little Googling suggests it might be a wasp spider, but do you know for sure?
Thank you for your time and for any help you can give!
All the best,
Amelia

Orbweaver

Dear Amelia,
In our opinion, you have the genus correct but not the species for your Orbweaver.  We believe, based on this Age Fotostock image that your spider is
Argiope lobata.  Images on iNaturalist and ArachnoPhoto support that ID.

Subject:  Black and yellow bug
Geographic location of the bug:  NE Oklahoma
Date: 08/31/2018
Time: 08:09 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey bugman-
Tgaese are invading myhome. They are everywhere – walls, ceilings counter tops and even floor.  It hasn’t bitten or stung any one. . . Yet.
How you want your letter signed:  Cyndiluwho

Striped Blister Beetle

Dear Cyndiluwho,
This is a Striped Blister Beetle,
Epicauta vittata, and according to BugGuide: “Feeds on variety of plants, especially Solanaceae (e.g., potatoes, tomatoes), also soybeans, other crops. Pigweed, Amaranthus species, not a crop plant, is also fed upon extensively.” This is an outdoor species that occasionally enters homes accidentally, so we don’t know why you are finding so many indoors.  According to Featured Creatures:  “The adults are most active during the morning and late afternoon, seeking shelter from the sun at mid-day. In particularly hot, arid climates they remain inactive during the day, confining their activity to the evening hours.”  That site also notes:  “Striped blister beetle is one of the most damaging of the blister beetles to vegetable crops in areas where it occurs. This is due to its feeding preferences, which include several common crops and greater preference for foliage than some other species; its propensity to feed on fruits of solanaceous plants; its relatively large size and voracious appetite; its strong tendency to aggregate into large mating and feeding swarms; and its high degree of dispersiveness, which can result in sudden appearance of large swarms of beetles. … The damage caused by Epicauta spp. blister beetles is offset, at least during periods of relatively low beetle density, by the predatory behavior of blister beetle larvae. Epicauta spp. larvae feed on the eggs of grasshoppers, including many crop-damaging Melanoplus spp. During periods of grasshopper abundance the number of blister beetles tends to increase substantially.”  Blister Beetles should be handled with caution since some species are capable of secreting a compound, cantharidin, that is known to cause blistering in sensitive individuals.  We have selected your submission as our Bug of the Month for September 2018.

Striped Blister Beetle

Subject:  Yellow winged tiny wasp like insects
Geographic location of the bug:  California
Date: 08/31/2018
Time: 01:34 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this on my car and i never seen this before i tried looking it up on internet but no pics or anything wondering if you can help please im curious
How you want your letter signed:  Adrian Barbosa

Chalcidid Wasp

Dear Adrian,
This is a parasitoid Chalcidid Wasp, probably in the genus
Conura, formerly Spilochalcis.  According to BugGuide:  “most attack Lepidoptera pupae; a few parasitize Coleoptera (Chrysomelidae, Curculionidae) and Diptera (Syrphidae); some are secondary parasites of Ichneumonidae and Braconidae.”

Chalcidid Wasp