Subject: bug ID request
Location: coopersburg, Pa
August 18, 2016 3:19 pm
Saw these two bugs on my back deck in Coopersburg, Pa. They are about 1 1?2 inches long. Would love to know what they are.
Thank You,
Dan
Signature: banjodan

Mating Giant Robber Flies

Mating Giant Robber Flies

Dear banjodan,
These are mating Giant Robber Flies or Bee Killers in the genus
Promachus, a group that includes the Red Footed Cannibalfly.  We turned to BugGuide to see if we could find a species match for you, and we were surprised to find your image which was submitted to them last week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats that bug?
Location: Puebla Mexico
August 17, 2016 4:51 pm
Hello bugman , I was searching over internet in a lot of entomology sites and pics trying to find what kind of bug is this that I found over a “Mirabilis Jalapa” flower yesterday morning in the Mexican state of Puebla.
it is more or less 1 inch in size with 6 black and silver spoted legs, a pair of long antennas ending in a little bright silver part.
The body was coloured in a light orange tone filled whit brilliant and metalic silver spots, the back of thorax was covered with a kind of armor of the same silver brilliant under the sun metalic color. with a pair of wings .
Thak you a lot for your help and support all will be very appreciated.
Tomas K.
Puebla Mexico
Signature: Tomas K.

Sun Moth

Sun Moth

Dear Tomas,
We thought this little beauty resembled an Ermine Moth so we searched the superfamily Yponomeutoidea, Ermine Moths and Kin on BugGuide and we located a very similar looking moth identified as a Sun Moth in the family Heliodinidae.  We located another similar looking individual on Nature Watch, also identified only to the family level.  We returned to BugGuide and learned that three different genera in the Sun Moth family all look quite similar, so we hope a family identification will suffice as we do not believe we will be able to provide a species name or even a genus name with any certainty.  We have a single Sun Moth on our site, but it belongs to the family Castniidae, so will be classifying your individual with the Ermine Moths. 

Subject: bug
Location: United States
August 17, 2016 11:34 pm
Sir I am 8 months pregnant and would love to know what kind of bug has been on my mattress since I’ve been gone. I’m scared it’s bed bugs and I know I can’t afford to get rid of them. The small ones look like fleas, the big ones look like ticks. I had bug bites on my arms for awhile I just didn’t know it was from my mattress.
Signature: shayla price

Bed Bug

Bed Bug

Dear Shayla,
We are sorry to have to tell you that this is a Bed Bug.  The good news is that Bed Bugs do not spread diseases.  We would urge you to consult with a physician, but to the best of our knowledge, bites from a Bed Bug should not affect your unborn child.  Again, we are not medical experts, so you should check with a physician.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big fly
Location: Arizona
August 17, 2016 10:24 am
Someone suggested it could be a salmon fly. It’s similar but not the same as the photos I’ve found. It is on my front porch. No water nearby, though we’ve had a little rain this past week. Neighbors down the street have a pool, but would like fly eggs survive the chlorine? Even with rain, it’s very dry in zip code 86326.
Signature: Bug aficionado

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Bug aficionado,
This is most definitely NOT a Salmonfly.  It is an Antlion in the family Myrmeleontidae and we believe we have correctly identified it as
Vella fallax thanks to images posted to BugGuide where it states:  “very large, wingspan to circa 120 mm, with tropical specimens even larger.”  Antlion larvae are sometimes called Doodlebugs.  The larvae of many species lie buried in the sand at the bottom of a pit where they wait with only their mandibles exposed for hapless creatures to fall into their jaws.  We suspect the creators of the “graboids” from the movie Tremors used Doodlebugs as inspiration.

Thank you! I used to recite the “doodlebug” poem when I was a child visiting cousins in NC. I had no idea they were ant predators.

Subject: Black beetles
Location: Tonto creek, payson Arizona
August 18, 2016 6:10 am
Yesterday, I was up at camp and there were tons of black beetles on their backs on the porch. I helped move them into the dirt, so nobody killed them, and when they were in the dirt, they dug down and hid there. I was wondering what kind of beetle they were. They had a tiny horn at the front but they weren’t rhinoceros beetles.
Signature: Emma

Ox Beetle

Ox Beetle

Dear Emma,
This is an Ox Beetle in the genus
Strategus.  According to BugGuide, three species:   Strategus aloeus, Strategus cessus and Strategus craigi are found in Arizona.  BugGuide also states:  “Prefer sandy soils, apparently.”  For the record, Ox Beetles are classified as Rhinoceros Beetles in the subfamily Dynastinae.

Subject: Afghan Beetle
Location: Eastern Afghanistan
August 18, 2016 1:20 am
Hello,
I am currently deployed in Afghanistan and found this beetle outside our sleep tent. Just wandering if you could identify it and maybe give a little information about it. I’m more curious than anything and would like to pass on any helpful information to my guys here. Thanks.
Signature: CPT P

Prionid:  Prionus vartianorum

Prionid: Prionus vartianorum

Dear CPT P,
This is one of the Root Borers in the subfamily Prioninae.  We located the Afghanistan page of Prioninae of the World and it contains three species.  We believe your individual is a female
 Prionus vartianorum based on images on Prioninae of the World.  No host plant is listed and the distribution is listed as solely Afghanistan, meaning the species may be endemic to Afghanistan.  Male Prionids are frequently attracted to lights, and females of some species are also attracted to lights.  Virtual Collections has images of a male specimen, and the country listed is also just Afghanistan.  We believe it can go without saying that you should stay clear of the mandibles.  A large Prionid can easily draw blood should it bite a human.  

Prionid:  Prionus vartianorum

Prionid: Prionus vartianorum