Subject: Unknown Bug
Location: Penang, Malaysia
November 13, 2016 4:29 am
Hey Bugman,
Can you identify this bug? I found it while hiking. It was very skittish.
Thanks again for your help!
Signature: Jon

Cockroach Nymph (higher resolution image)

Cockroach Nymph (higher resolution image)

Dear Jon,
Do you have a higher resolution file you can send?  The mouthparts on this insect look decidedly Orthopteran, and the lack of wings would indicate an immature specimen, but what is unusual to us is the morphology of the hind legs.  They are not as well-developed for jumping as in many Orthopterans.  We will begin researching this unusual critter’s identity soon.  The antennae are unusually thick at the base and after the distinctive white band, they taper off like threads.

Eric Eaton provides a correction.
Daniel:
This is the nymph of some kind of cockroach (Blattodea).
Eric

Update:  November 24, 2016
Subject: Re-upload
Location: Penang, Malaysia
November 24, 2016 6:14 am
Hey Bugman,
Here’s a better quality picture of the bug I showed you a while back. Thanks!
Signature: Jon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: monarchs
Location: Westhampton Beach, NY
November 13, 2016 8:47 am
Dear Bugman,
I planted lots of butterfly weed in my yard & had so many monarch caterpillars this year! But now it is cold here in the northeast (east end of Long Island, NY) and I still see some. The problem is, the plants are dying and the caterpillars don’t have much to eat. Is there a way to save the larvae? There is one chrysalis hanging on a dead leaf. You can already see the wings inside. Will this hatch successfully & fly south? Thanks.
Signature: Elaine

Prepupal Monarch Caterpillar

Prepupal Monarch Caterpillar

Hi Elaine,
Alas, we cannot state with any certainty that your soon to emerge Monarch will successfully complete its migration voyage.  In nature’s effort to preserve populations, and because of the uncertainty of weather, insects may continue to reproduce past the time that they would complete metamorphosis before inclement weather begins.  From year to year, that date changes.  Like you, we will hope for the best.  If you cannot feed the larvae on milkweed, we don’t think your existing caterpillars will survive.

Thanks so much for your quick response.  I’ll see if I can find some local “weed” to feed them!

Subject: Beautiful Wasp
Location: Chiriqui, panama
November 12, 2016 8:27 pm
Hi Bugman, I saw this wasp at a gas station in Panama in October. A tour guide said it was a spider hawk but the internet pictures of those show they have orange wings. The closest thing I found to this is the great black wasp but the wings are not the same shape. Any ideas?
Signature: Lori Mailloux

Spider Wasp

Spider Wasp

Dear Lori,
We agree with the tour guide that this is a Spider Wasp in the family Pompilidae, and Tarantula Hawks belong to a genera of Spider Wasps, and many, but not all, have orange wings.  Alas, we have not had any luck finding any matching images online.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of bug is this?
Location: SF Bay Area
November 10, 2016 5:06 pm
Hello,
I saw this type of bug in my backyard. What kind is it? It looks real nasty.
Signature: Anonymous

Potato Bug

Potato Bug

Dear Anonymous,
The Potato Bug is a common California sighting, with most of our reports occurring shortly after a rain because these typically subterranean dwellers come to the surface at that time.

Potato Bug

Potato Bug

Subject: Identify bug
Location: Davidson
November 12, 2016 11:25 am
Hi we would like to know what type of bug my son had in his basement bathroom. Seems to come from under the corner shower.
Thanks
Signature: Flo

Woodlice

Woodlice

Dear Flo,
These are Woodlice or Sowbugs, and children commonly call them Rollie-Pollies because they curl into balls.  They are harmless, and though they are normally found outdoors in the garden, they can sometimes be found in damp areas indoors.  Where is Davidson?

Hi,
Thanks for the response.  Davidson is between Saskatoon Saskatchewan and Regina Saskatchewan (about half way).
Is there anything we can use to get rid of them?
Thanks again,
Florence

Thanks for the clarification.  We do not provide extermination advice.

Subject: Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Variant?
Location: Portland, Oregon
November 11, 2016 5:09 pm
These two hemipterans were playing touchy-feely near Portland, Oregon. One is obviously a Western Boxelder bug, but the other one is leaving me slightly perplexed. Although the photograph doesn’t do it justice, the shield bug was essentially black and gold, almost as if highlighted with goldleaf. I suspect it is just a variant of the brown marmorated stink bug; I’ve seen ones with brownish, or reddish, or greenish hues, but never one that that seemed to sparkle in the sun. In any case, after about a minute of inter-species investigation the two bugs went their separate ways. Your thoughts? I know you’re probably inundated with identification requests, so if this is just another BMSB, please feel free to ignore the inquiry.
Thanks,
Signature: David Hopkins

Stink Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Stink Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Dear David,
We have corrected the spelling error you requested.  In our opinion, this is NOT a Brown Marmorated Stink Bug because according to BugGuide:  “The brown mottled color and banded antennae are distinctive” and your individual has solid colored antennae.  This might be an African Cluster Bug,
Agonoscelis puberula, which we found on BugGuide, though BugGuide does not list the range for this invasive species in Oregon at this time.  Our biggest doubt regarding that as the identification is that BugGuide indicates it is “very pubescent” or hairy, and your individual appears to be quite smooth in your high quality image.  So, for now we cannot commit to a species identification, and we really like your inter-species investigation with the Western Boxelder Bug.

Possibly African Cluster Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Possibly African Cluster Bug and Western Boxelder Bug

Thanks for your very prompt reply, Daniel.  I noticed the lack of antennal banding, as well, although there does seem to be some variation in the widths of the light and dark bands on the brown marmorated stink bug.  With a little imagination (well, with a lot of imagination, actually) hints of white at the antennal joints might be made out, but not enough to be considered banding.  I think you’re right that it’s probably not an African Cluster Bug; not only is it not very pubescent, it lacks the light “Y” or trident shape commonly seen on the scutellum.  For now, let’s call it Verus mysterium!
Dave