Subject:  weird catapiller
Geographic location of the bug:  south eastern Tennessee
Date: 05/08/2018
Time: 05:44 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hey found this on my leg fishing and never seen it before what is it? thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Mr Crabtree

Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Dear Mr Crabtree,
This is a Whitemarked Tussock Moth Caterpillar.  Handle with caution as this species has urticating hairs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What’s in my web?
Geographic location of the bug:  Camarillo, Ca near succulents
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 07:53 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Dear Bugman,
I was outdoors enjoying some fresh air and succulents  and noticed a pretty substantial spider web plus these very interesting white spiky spheres. I’m wondering if you can identify them?
How you want your letter signed:  Melanie on the Irish Chain

Brown Widow Egg Sacs

Dear Melanie on the Irish Chain,
These are the Egg Sacs of a Brown Widow Spider, a species recently introduced to North America from Africa.  The Brown Widow is a relative of the native Western Black Widow, and since the introduction of the Brown Widow, populations of native Western Black Widows seem to have diminished, perhaps being displaced by a more competitive relative.

Subject:  This was a huge bug with extra long antennae
Geographic location of the bug:  Phuket, Thailand
Date: 05/08/2018
Time: 05:11 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hey there,
Came across this beautiful specimen in our complex.  He looked rather big and mean, but he sat there happily and let me take a few shots of him.
I would love to know what bug he is so I can read more about him.
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks again, Adam

Longicorn: Batocera species

Dear Adam,
This is a Longicorn in the genus
Batocera, the group that contains the Mango Stem Borer, Batocera rufomaculata.  This might be a regional color variation on the Mango Stem Borer or it might be a related species.  We have an image in our archives from China illustrating individuals with similar markings that might be Batocera rubus, and we found a posting on Dreamstime (not a scientific site) that identifies a similarly marked individual as a Mango Stem Borer.

Thank you so much for your reply.
I’ll keep a look out for anymore of these fine creatures and see what markings they have.
Have a great day
Adam
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Pittsburgh,PA
Date: 05/08/2018
Time: 10:44 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Here’s the ‘little’ guy.
How you want your letter signed:  Naomi

Luna Moth

Dear Naomi,
Thanks for your comment and also for submitting your image.  This is our first Luna Moth sighting this year.  Generally we received our first sighting report in late January or February and that sighting comes from the south, including Texas and Georgia, and as spring moves north, the sightings continue, including sightings from Maine in June.  We are curious why there is such a dearth of Luna Moth sightings this spring. 

Subject:  Beetle maybe?
Geographic location of the bug:  New Castle, PA
Date: 05/06/2018
Time: 08:54 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi,
My brother foundthis bug outside his house. I love Bugs and was interested because I’ve never seen this one before. After trying many different ID tools and researching as I normally do, I’m still drawing a blank. My children and I would love to know if this a beetle and if so, what kind?
How you want your letter signed:  Thank you! Monica C. Edmonds

Hickory Borer

Dear Monica,
Both this Hickory Borer,
Megacyllene caryae, which is active in the spring, and its look-alike relative the Locust Borer which is active in the fall are beetles that mimic stinging wasps, specifically Yellowjackets.  Our editorial staff is from Youngstown, Ohio, and when we return, a visit to New Castle is generally part of the itinerary.

OMGosh thank you! I’m going to tell my brother right now!
Sincerely,
Monica

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Nevada City, Ca
Date: 05/07/2018
Time: 10:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Can you please tell us what this moth is?
How you want your letter signed:  Nancy

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Nancy,
This is a Ceanothus Silkmoth, and ironically, you have an image of the moth on a lilac.  Adult Ceanothus Silkmoths do not feed, but the food plant of the caterpillar is the Ceanothus, commonly called a California lilac, which is not related to the blooming lilac in your image.  The antennae on your individual leads us to believe it is a male.

Ceanothus Silkmoth