Subject:  Need ID on chrysalis
Geographic location of the bug:  Austin, Texas 78717
Date: 02/25/2018
Time: 05:16 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,  I’m in Austin Texas and was cleaning up my butterfly garden today when I found this on the ground… any idea what it may be?
How you want your letter signed:  Lori in Austin

Tersa Sphinx Pupa

Dear Lori in Austin,
Do you grow
Pentas in your butterfly garden?  This looks like the pupa of a Tersa Sphinx and the caterpillars feed on Pentas.

I do (did, before winter) have pentas in my garden! Thank you!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What is this bug?
Geographic location of the bug:  Brampton, Ontario, Canada
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 09:04 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  There were many of these bugs last summer. I’ve never seen them before. They were near my blazing stars, wild geraniums, clematis and lilies. They are not the same as the bugs that attacked  my lilies the year before.
How you want your letter signed:  Dying to know.

Firebug

Dear Dying to know,
This sure looks to us like a European Firebug,
Pyrrhocoris apterus, a species that has been introduced to North America, but according to BugGuide, there are only reports from Utah.  If it has also become established in Canada, you should probably notify your local agricultural agency.

Subject:  Unknown
Geographic location of the bug:  Buenos Aires, Argentina
Date: 02/27/2018
Time: 07:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello, I have found two of these cute  wingless bee like fuzzy bugs. It’s beige with lighter whiteish stripes and the end of its body is white. It has rabbit ear “antennas” or kind of… it only has 6 or 8 legs near its head, doesn’t move much when touched and the size is about  1/ 1.5 cm in length. I can’t really distinguish a mouth or anything else, it’s legs are skinny with no fuzziness as the rest of the body.
How you want your letter signed:  Macy

Female Vapourer Moth

Dear Macy,
This looks to us like a flightless female Vapourer Moth in the genus
Orgyia.  Though it is from England, there is a nice image on Wildlife Insight for comparison and here is a BugGuide image as well.  We have a posting of a caterpillar from the genus Orgyia from Argentina in our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Central West western australia
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 06:43 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I have seen these many times over my lifetime but never known what they are. I have tried to find info via Google and the closest thing I’ve found is cicada.
How you want your letter signed:  Regards, Helen

Antlion

Dear Helen,
This is an Antlion, not a Cicada.  The larvae of Antlions are frequently called Doodlebugs.

Subject:  Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Oklahoma
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 01:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just wondering what bug this is
How you want your letter signed:  Diana

False Bombardier Beetle

Dear Diana,
This is a False Bombardier Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults eat other insects, especially caterpillars” and “Caution: These beetles have chemical defenses.”

Subject:  Strange bug found by swimming pool
Geographic location of the bug:  Brisbane Australia
Date: 02/26/2018
Time: 09:46 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi  we came across this guy the other day. Found by my grand daughter. Just wondered if you have seen anything like it before. Thanks
How you want your letter signed:  Gary Buckle

Mealybug Destroyer Larva

Dear Gary,
This looks to us like the larva of a Lady Beetle known as a Mealybug Destroyer, a species native to Australia that has been exported for agricultural purposes to help control populations of Mealybugs in agricultural areas.  The larva is pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.