Subject:  A mystery Shield Bug in Costa Rica
Geographic location of the bug:  San Ramon, Costa Rica
Date: 01/20/2018
Time: 01:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I found this bug in a bromeliad leaf. It’s so pretty and I wanted to find out what he was. Thanks!
How you want your letter signed:  Irene Dickinson

Shield Bug

Dear Irene,
This really is a beautiful Shield Bug in the family Scutellaridae, and it is quite apparent why in parts of the world, Shield Bugs are called Jewel Bugs, notably Australia, as this Queensland Museum posting indicates.  Alas we were not having any luck locating images online of white Shield Bugs from Costa Rica, so we turned to our own archives where we have an image posted of a Spotted Shield Bug,
Pachycoris torridus, from Costa Rica that looks similar but is quite different in both colors and markings.  We thought perhaps your individual might be in the same genus.  We were actually shocked to learn it is the same species, based on this image from Project Noah.  According to Neotropical Entomology there is much variation in both colors and markings for this species.

Shield Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  What kind of bug is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  oahu,Hi
Date: 01/19/2018
Time: 01:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Just would like to know what it is.
How you want your letter signed: Sam

Big Legged Bug

Dear Sam,
This is a Big Legged Bug or Leaf Footed Bug in the family Coreidae.  Many insects in Hawaii are not native, and it is very likely that this is an introduced species.  Except for being darker, it really resembles the Sweet Potato Bug,
Physomerus grossipes, pictured on Graham’s Island where it states it:  “is a fairly recent introduction to Hawaii, most likely sneaking in on an imported plant. It’s from the family Coreidae, otherwise known as leaf footed bugs. It feeds by sucking juices out of various plants, including sweet potatoes. I found this one wandering across a window screen, some distance from anything edible.”  The images on Encyclopedia of Life also look very similar, but the images on the highly entertaining posting No Thighmaster Needed by This Bug on Hawaii Horticulture appear to be a different species in the family.

Big Legged Bug

 

Subject:  Can you identify this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Andalusia, spain
Date: 01/20/2018
Time: 09:24 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi, I was recently clearing ground, mainly olliander, and there were dozens (if not hundreds) of these small bugs. I assume that are some form of bark beetle, but can you help?
They are about 8-10 mm in size and this was in January 2018
How you want your letter signed:  Thanks in advance

Soldier Bugs

These are not Bark Beetles.  They are True Bugs and we located a matching image on Insects of Spain, but it is not identified.  Continued research led us to Honey Guide where we found images identified as Ground Bugs, Spilostethus pandurus.  That scientific name led us to Fauna and Funghi of Malta and the common name Soldier Bug and the information:  “A common insect often found solitary on wild plants or on the ground in vegetated areas. It is 12-15mm long and easily spotted due to its conspicuous red/black colour pattern. Despite it can be easily detected and caught by predators, it defends itself from them by secreting pungent odours and have a very repulsive taste, hence the predator will not eat another specimen of this species. It have pecial needle-like mandibles by which it pierce vegetative parts or other insects to feed on.”  iNaturalist verified the common name Soldier Bug as well as numerous sightings in Spain.

Soldier Bug

Soldier Bug

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Caterpillar
Geographic location of the bug:  Maungaturoto
Date: 01/19/2018
Time: 07:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Heya this big dude just bout ended up squished this morning and we have never seen anything similar???!!!
How you want your letter signed:  Toni Pool

Convolvulus Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Toni,
This is a Hornworm, the caterpillar of a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth from the family Sphingidae, and though a dorsal view is not ideal for identification purposes (a lateral view shows more details) the red caudal horn should help in identification.  We found only two species from the family represented on the Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research site, and the caterpillar of the Convolvulus Hawkmoth,
Agrius convolvuli, pictured on Butterfly House looks like a very good match.

Subject:  need help identifying a cute bug my friend found
Geographic location of the bug:  sao paulo brazil
Date: 01/19/2018
Time: 05:18 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  hi my friend sent me this bug he thought was really pretty and i wanted to help identify it for him but i couldnt for the life of me figure out what the lil guy was!!!
my friend said it didnt jump or fly at all. it just crawled around
and if i had to guess it could be like a nymph of something maybe???
(these are my friends images)
How you want your letter signed:  charlie

Stink Bug Hatchling

Dear Charlie,
This little guy is a hatchling Heteropteran or True Bug, and we are pretty certain it is a hatchling Stink Bug in the family Pentatomidae.  It might not be possible to provide a species as nymphs can be difficult to identify with certainty.

Stink Bug Hatchling

THANKS SO MUCH
Me n him were goin crazy trying 2 figure it out haha!!! We thought it might have been a stink bug but we werent sure because we only came across brown stinkbug nymphs in our search i think, none that looked like this.
Its nice 2 know definitely thats what it was!!! Thanks a big bunch

Subject:  cow killer or Velvet ant
Geographic location of the bug:  humble texas
Date: 01/19/2018
Time: 01:35 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:
here sir are 3 pics of this  beautiful female wingless Wasp, I found in Humble Texas . It was about as round as a chocolate mini tootsie roll candy and about 1 &1/4 inches long , and very beautiful. after letting it crawl all over my arms chest and shoulder, I took it to the fence line and leaned back against a tall cedar tree that was surrounded by smaller nest of wild bee’s . and it went after the other bee’s nest . I thought cool no more pesky and bothersome sweat bee’s and mock honey bee’s.
I watched it for about a month and then it was gone . it was one of the most beautiful Little wasp I have ever seen and very genital with me as I was with it  .
I do feel blessed to have been able to witness such a beautiful little critter doing its thing .
Have a blessed day Sir.
How you want your letter signed:  Mr David Mullins

Cowkiller

Dear Mr. Mullins,
Your account of your encounter with this beautiful Cowkiller, the largest North American Velvet Ant, is so earnest that we are truly touched, but you should be warned that the sting of a Cowkiller is reported to be very painful.  You are a brave soul to allow it to crawl all over your arms chest and shoulder.  She obviously did not feel threatened by the experience.  We strongly suspect, though, that your experience was genial or gentle rather than genital.

Cowkiller