June 19, 2016
We just returned from a trip to Ohio and we read in The Youngstown Vindicator that Brood V Periodical Cicadas had just begun to emerge in West Virginia.  Our cousin heard and saw them while fishing in Eastern Ohio, but we have no images to post.  Cicada Mania has a posting from a few days ago.  If you are in Ohio, West Virginia, New York, Virginia, Pennsylvania or Maryland, please send us your images of Brood V Periodical Cicadas so we can post them.  Thanks for your assistance.  We are using a Brood XIII individual taken by Venom in Glenview, Illinois in June 2007.  Periodical Cicadas emerge every 17 years or 13 years, depending upon the Brood, and they are sometimes called 17 Year Locusts, though they are unrelated Cicadas.

Periodical Cicada: Brood XIII from 2007

Periodical Cicada: Brood XIII from 2007

Subject: regarding your cicada post
Location: atlanta
June 19, 2016 10:00 am
Signature: dee

Thanks dee,
Your nymph is not that of a Periodical Cicada, and Georgia is beyond the known range for Brood V, but your image is gorgeous.  So, we are still awaiting images of true Brood V Periodical Cicadas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location: Otok Hvar
June 18, 2016 7:31 am
Hi,
I have got as far as identifying this bug as a Shieldback Katydid, probably a female, but I am unable to find any photo on line or in my books of anything which is remotely similar in colouring. I wonder if you have any ideas pleas?
Thank you
Signature: Norman Woollons

Shieldback Katydid:

Shield-Backed Katydid:  Eupholidoptera chabrieri schmidti

Subject: I’ve identified the Katydid Bug!
June 19, 2016 2:10 am
Hi,
I emailed you yesterday with a photo of a Shieldback Katydid that I found, with the vivid yellow head stripe.  I received your automated reply at 16:31.
After a lot more online research, I have now identified it so don’t worry about trying yourselves.  It is a Eupholidoptera chabrieri schmidti, and is native to the Adriatic coast.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eupholidoptera_chabrieri
Sincerely
Signature: Norman Woollons

Dear Norman,
We are very happy you were able to identify your Shield-backed Katydid, and we want to thank you for following up with us so that we can create a posting.  We were away from the office and we are trying to respond to over a week’s worth of identifications that arrived in our absence as well as requests that have come in since our return.  We had to  research your location and we learned that Otok Hvar is a Croatian island in the Adriatic Sea.  The Encyclopedia of Life also has an image of this subspecies and Patio Door has some wonderful images.

Hi Daniel
Thanks for the email and the two links.  I wasn’t aware of those websites.  Yes, my home is a beautiful island in the warm Adriatic where I have a small fruit farm which borders the Maquis, hence I get all sorts of interesting insects.
Know exactly what you mean about the inbox when you come back from holidays!
Kindest regards

Subject: lined bugs along avocado leaf
Location: Tampa Florida
June 9, 2016 2:25 pm
What are these bugs lining an avocado leaf in Tampa, Florda?
Signature: Holly E Huff

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Dear Holly,
These are Katydid EggsKatydids are large, usually green insects that are related to and which resemble Grasshoppers, but with much longer antennae.  Like Crickets, Katydids make audible sounds that contribute to the orchestra of sound produced by insects.  Though they feed on leaves, Katydids are solitary feeders who do litter harm to garden plants.  We would encourage you to tolerate them in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Virginia
June 9, 2016 1:19 pm
I have killed 3 of these so far
Signature: Betty

Wheel Bug Nymph

Wheel Bug Nymph

Dear Betty,
This is a Wheel Bug nymph, a beneficial predator.  When they hatch in the spring, Wheel Bug nymphs often arouse attention as they look somewhat like spiders as they cluster around their distinctive grouping of eggs.  They soon set out as solitary hunters, taking small prey like Aphids, a scourge to any home gardener.  It actually appears that the individual in your image is feeding off a small insect, possibly an Aphid.  Mature Wheel Bugs have a distinctive “cog” along the upper surface of the thorax that makes them very distinctive looking.  Mature Wheel Bugs are able to take much larger prey, and they help eliminate many unwanted insects in the garden.  Wheel Bugs are also quite large and they are probably the largest members of the Assassin Bug family in North America.  All Assassin Bugs might bite if carelessly handled, but we almost never receive reports from folks who have been bitten by a Wheel Bug.  If it occurs, a bite may cause temporary local sensitivity and swelling, but it will have no lasting effect.  We hope we have convinced you to refrain from future Unnecessary Carnage of Wheel Bugs.

Subject: Colorful bug
Location: 48118
June 9, 2016 2:47 pm
I saw this crawling at the base of a rose bush on June 9 2016 near Chelsea MI.
It’s very colorful but what is it?
Signature: Curious G

Eyed Tiger Moth

Eyed Tiger Moth

Dear Curious G,
This is a newly metamorphosed Giant Leopard Moth or Eyed Tiger Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia.  Once its wings expand, they will cover the colorful abdomen and the Giant Leopard Moth will be able to fly to seek out a mate.  Adult Giant Leopard Moths do not eat, surviving off the fat they stored as Woolly Bear Caterpillars.

Subject: Is this a ladybird spider?
Location: Mytilene, Greece
June 9, 2016 2:45 pm
Hello I am in Mytilene, Greece, where I found this beautiful spider and tried to take a picture but was too fast for a good shot. I would like to learn if it is poisonous
Goog job
Signature: Eri

Ladybird Spider

Ladybird Spider

Dear Eri,
This is indeed a male Ladybird Spider and they are not considered dangerous to humans.