Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Coconut Creek
December 15, 2016 4:49 pm
I was wondering if you identify this caterpillar for me
Signature: Normal

Pink Striped Oakworm

Pink Striped Oakworm

Dear Normal,
This is one of the Oakworms in the genus Anisota, and we believe based on this BugGuide image that it is a Pink Striped Oakworm,
Anisota virginiensis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can’t fathom what this is
Location: Alabama
December 19, 2016 2:11 am
Dear bugman,
I found this bug crawling slowly in my room. I live in Alabama. I know we have carpet beetles I literally cannot figure out what this is. It’s like covered or made out of black fur. It had legs and was crawling. The pictures Wil do the best talking. Please if you can check it out o appreciate it .
Signature: Chel

Lady Beetle Larva

Lady Beetle Larva

Dear Chel,
This sure looks like a predatory Lady Beetle Larva to us.

Lady Beetle Larva

Lady Beetle Larva

Oh thank you so so so so so much !! I am so happy to know what it was ! 🙂

Subject: Spider under my pillow
Location: Durban south Africa
December 17, 2016 4:29 am
Hey bugman, I found a spider under my pillow last night and I was wondering if you can identify it for me
Signature: Shane

Ogre Faced Spider

Ogre Faced Spider

Dear Shane,
We are relatively confident we have correctly identified this leggy spider as an Ogre Faced Spider in the genus
Deinopsis from the Net Casting Spider family  thanks to images on iSpot.  According to BioDiversity Explorer:  “They are harmless to man” and “Deinopids are unique in that they actively use and manipulate a web to capture prey. First a scaffold web is constructed and attached to the vegetation over an area where prey will pass. The spider then positions itself with its head up and using a comb-like structure (cribellum) on the tibia of its hind legs, it combs out cribellate silk from a special silk-producing organ called the calamistrum. The calamistrum is a cream coloured band about 1.5 to 2 mm long and about 0.2 to 0.5 mm wide and is situated anterior to the spinnerets, viewed from below. It consists of 20 000 to 40 000 spigots (silk-producing organs), each producing a very fine strand of silk. The silk is combed out onto the normal silk strands of what will be the capture net and has a woolly appearance. In fact, the silk looks like this as it is in a relaxed form, like a relaxed rubber band and has a 400 to 600% stretch capacity. The rectangular capture net made of this crumpled silk has no adhesive capture ability but relies on entangling properties instead – much like Velcro, where the net tangles with projections on the prey’s body.
When the net is ready the spider re-orientates itself on the scaffold web with the head facing down, grasps the net by the four corners with the four front legs, gives it a few stretches, and then relaxes the net and waits for prey. For walking prey, the net is held horizontally or vertically over the substrate and when flying prey is detected, the net is flicked backwards, over the carapace, still in a vertical or horizontal position. Visual senses are used to detect walking prey such as cockroaches, ants and even spiders but vibration senses are used to detect flying insects, moths being the most common prey.
When prey is detected, the spider propels itself forward, stretching the net further and then suddenly releasing the tension, although not letting go of the net. The net contracts and ensnares the prey. Once captured, the prey is then secured further with silk fed from the spider’s spinnerets with the hind legs. While the scaffold net is reused each night, the capture net is used only once. A new capture net is constructed each evening and in the morning it is simply rolled into a ball and eaten.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Little black bugs in my kitchen after I ran the dishwasher
Location: Kitchen
December 18, 2016 8:30 pm
Hello I recently moved into a new home, and got everything brand new. I ran my dishwasher for the first time and the next day I noticed little black bugs they are very tiny and move slowly can you
Please tell me what type it is I’m very paranoid when it comes to bugs, and I want to make sure the previous owners didn’t leave any bugs that you can’t get rid of
Signature: Renee Douglas

Cockroach Nymph

Cockroach Nymph

Dear Renee,
This is an immature Cockroach and it looks like it is an early instar, meaning it hatched recently.  That would be a sign there were breeding adult Cockroaches present.  Though your image lacks critical detail, we suspect this is the nymph of a Smoky Brown Cockroach which is described on BugGuide as “Early instars are black insects with characteristic white markings on the distal antenae, proximal antennae, thorax and abdomen.”

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Portland, Oregon
December 18, 2016 11:32 pm
I saw this sucker walking up a door frame. When I attempted to catch it it flew away. Wondering if maybe it was hiding in the doug fur Christmas tree we brought home yesterday ?
Signature: Jason

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Western Conifer Seed Bug

Dear Jason,
Western Conifer Seed Bugs are notorious for entering homes when the weather cools to hibernate, but according to BugGuide, they feed on “sap from green cones, twigs, seed pulp, and sometimes needles of Pinaceae (pines, hemlock, spruce, Douglas-fir)” so it might have gained access to your home on the tree as well.

Subject: Found this in a bedroom
Location: Braintree, Essex, England
December 16, 2016 3:23 am
Would really appreciate your help. My daughter found this in her bedroom and having looked at a few websites I have no idea what it is.
Signature: Thanks, Neil

Possibly Bot Fly Larva

Possibly Bot Fly Larva

Dear Neil,
This thing reminds us of a Bot Fly larva, but we have never seen an image of a Bot Fly larva with spiny projections along its body.  We will do additional research and get back to you.  It is possible it gained entrance to your daughter’s bedroom because of a family pet.

Possibly Bot Fly Larva

Possibly Bot Fly Larva

Thank you for tour prompt email.
I hope you have luck finding it, one thing that may help is that we don’t have family pets other than guinea pigs but they live outside.
Thanks again for your help, its much appreciated
Neil

Many Bot Flies are endoparasites on rodents, so the Guinea Pigs may be playing host.

Eric Eaton provides a correction:  Little House Fly Larva
Daniel:
Pretty certain the fly larva is Fannia sp., family Fanniidae.  They used to be in the Muscidae, but are now in their own family.  Known as “Little House Flies.”  Hm-m-m, I may have to do more digging, but the “habitat” would sure fit for that, too.
… I’d like permission to use the Fannia larva images so I can do a blog post.  I found an adult here in Colorado Springs just a couple weeks ago.  I’m attaching an image, in fact.
Happy holidays, safe travels!
Cheers,
Eric

Little House Fly (courtesy of Eric Eaton)

Little House Fly (courtesy of Eric Eaton)

Hi Daniel,
I have attached both images I took as my phone doesn’t keep a record of emails sent for some strange reason.
I am more than happy for him to use the images I did have a look on line at the one he thinks it is and it does look similar other than the one online mentioned 5-8 mm and a black head, I think you can see from the images this was approx 15mm and didnt have a black head. ..
TBH Im more concerned about if its dangerous, how and why it was in my daughter’s bedroom and to stop it happening again.
Thanks again for all your help
Neil

Presumably Little House Fly Larva

Presumably Little House Fly Larva