Subject: Weird Bug
Location: Sydney, Australia
August 19, 2016 7:19 pm
Hey there,
We found this bug in our garage, any idea what it is?
Signature: Dale

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Dear Dale,
These are most likely Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs.  The hatchlings are such fierce and beneficial predators that the species has evolved, indeed many members of the order Neuroptera have evolved, so as to lay eggs in a manner that will help protect the hatchlings from being eaten by one another.  The duration needed for each individual to hatch and climb down the stalk helps to separate it from its siblings in both time and space.  You may verify our identification on the Australian Museum site where it states:  “The larvae are ambush predators with traplike jaws feeding on small invertebrates found in the leaf litter.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grubs found in rotting wood of coral tree
Location: Los Angeles
August 19, 2016 9:30 am
Good morning, Bugman.
We discovered today a large area of rot on the base of our coral tree. Excavating the rot, I found several communities of this grub pictured. The animals seemed at first not to move at all, but after some time, it became evident that they do move, very slowly.
I am inclined to believe that they are taking advantage of the rotted wood, and are not the cause of it.
They were surely not expecting this sudden exposure!
Can you identify them?
Signature: Swami M

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Dear Swami,
We are nearly certain these are Black Soldier Fly larvae,
Hermetia illucens, which you may find pictured on BugGuide.  Black Soldier Fly larvae are frequently found in compost piles, where they are beneficial as they aid in decomposition.  According to BugGuide:  “Commercially distributed for composting” and “Larvae live in compost, dung, rotting vegetation.”

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Om
Dear Daniel,
Thanks so much for getting back to me. Yes, I agree the larvae match the images of Black Soldier Fly larvae on your website.
I am hoping we can save our tree; it seems to be infected with some kind of rot that turns the wood right under the bark to mush. Apparently these larvae love it, as there are quite a few.
Best wishes,
Mahayogananda
ps I’m at the Vedanta Society in Hollywood

Subject: Hummingbird Lepidopteran
Location: Bronx NY
August 19, 2016 8:01 am
Found this beauty outside the butterfly garden I worked at this summer. Had large transparent patches on its wings.
Signature: Anthony Macchiano

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear Anthony,
Though there are several similar looking, closely related species in your area, we agree that this is most likely a Hummingbird Clearwing,
Hemaris thysbe, and you can read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Scarab Hunter Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Subject:  Female Scarab Hunter Wasp
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
August 18, 2016 9:30 AM
Just as we were leaving the office today to gawk at the guerilla art Donald Trump sculpture at Wacko (see LA Times or LAist ), we had to make a slight delay to take some images of this gorgeous female Scarab Hunter Wasp,
Campsomeris tolteca, nectaring on the flowering peppermint.  We first identified this species four years ago in Elyria Canyon Park.  Alas, the statue was in for the night, so we will have to return to Wacko during business hours.   Our identification of the female Scarab Hunter Wasp can be verified on BugGuide.

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Scarab Hunter Wasp

Subject:  For Bug Love
Location:  sorry… Magdalen Hill
August 18, 2016
For Bug Love
http://butterfly-conservation.org/2401-1937/magdalen-hill-down-hampshire.html
Clare

Mating Soldier Beetles

Mating Soldier Beetles

Dear Clare,
These are mating Soldier Beetles, and there is not a high enough resolution in your image to be certain of the species.  We located several similar looking species on Nature Spot, and regarding the species
Cantharis cryptica, Nature Spot indicates:  “7 to 8.5 mm. An orange/brown beetle with black rings above the ‘knees’ and all-yellow palps. There are several similar species and precise identification may need detailed examination.”  Another possible species is Cantharis rufa, and Nature Spot indicates:  “Length 9 – 11 mm. This soldier beetle is largely all orange but sometimes there is a black mark on the pronotum which is quite square looking and doesn’t reach to the front border (extending just over half way). The legs may be be pale or dark but with contrasting ‘knees’ in both cases.  Similar Species:  This species is larger than the similar Cantharis cryptica and C. pallida – both of which are 7-8mm in length. Rhagonycha translucida lacks the blacks knees and has a pronotum that narrows towards the head.”  Of the similar looking Cantharis pallida, Nature Spot indicates:  “They are frequent visitors to thistles and umbelliferous flowers, where they probably prey on other flower-feeding insects.”  That is a thistle in your image.  Finally, we could not rule out the larger Common Red Soldier Beetle, Rhagonycha fulva, and Nature Spot states:  “A very common beetle throughout most of Britain.”  After all that, we hope a family identification will suffice.

Subject: Fly
Location: My home in West Yorkshire UK
August 19, 2016 8:24 am
I found this fly in the house and only after “disposing” of it did I notice the white band around it’s body and the wing markings.. I’ve looked in my small book but found no record of it. I’m assuming it’s not a rarity but just wondered if you guys knew the species.
Thanks
Signature: Joe Lyman

Hover Fly

Great Pied HoverFly

Dear Joe,
This is a Hover Fly, , which we identified on British Hoverflies.  According to Nature Spot:  “Sometimes called the Pellucid Hoverfly, this is one of the largest flies in Britain. It has a striking ivory-white band across its middle and large dark spots on its wings.”  Nature Spot also states:  “Its larvae live in the nests of social wasps and bumblebees, eating waste products and the bee larvae.”  According to UK Safari:  “The Pellucid Hoverfly can be found in most wooded areas in the UK.  It’s shape and size are very bumblebee-like.  The name ‘pellucid’ literally means translucently clear, and if you catch this hoverfly in a certain light you can see right through its middle.  The other popular common name for this hoverfly is the ‘Great Pied Hoverfly’ on account of its black and white colouring. ”  According to Opal Westmidlands:  “
V. pellucens is by far the most common species of the genus and widely distributed across the UK.”

Great Pied Hoverfly

Great Pied Hoverfly

Wow… Cheers for a comprehensive identification..
Thanks and regards Joe