Subject: What is it?
Location: Jackson, Wyoming
June 19, 2016 4:57 pm
Can you identify this?
Signature: Don’t care

Fall Webworms

Fall Webworms

These are Fall Webworms, Hyphantria cunea.  According to BugGuide:  “Weblike tents in branch tips where clusters of caterpillars strip foliage (by contrast, eastern tent caterpillar nests are built in tree crotches)” and “Larvae feed on foliage throughout their development, and secrete silk which they spin into small webs. As they grow, they enlarge the webs, which can sometimes enclose the entire tree. Even severe infestations have little impact on trees because the damage occurs near the end of the annual growing season. Except in the case of ornamental trees, control is seldom necessary because the damage is generally of aesthetic rather than economic importance.”  BugGuide also notes:  “About 120 species of hardwood trees have been recorded as larval hosts in the north, common hosts include alder, apple, ash, birch, Box-Elder (Acer negundo), cherry, elm, mulberry, poplar, willow in the south, common hosts include ash, hickory, maple, mulberry, oak, pecan, poplar, redbud, sweetgum, walnut, willow; preferences for different host plant species appear to be regional and seasonal.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Flying Bug
Location: Maryland Eastern Shore
June 12, 2016 5:58 pm
I found this guy with a large bumblebee in its grasp. I searched extensively but got nowhere. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Nick

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Bumble Bee

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Bumble Bee

Dear Nick,
Large Robber Flies are arguably the most adept aerial predators in the insect world.  Dragonflies are larger, but they don’t tend to prey on larger insects, mainly satisfying themselves with mosquitoes and smaller prey.  Not so large Robber Flies that tend to prey on bees and wasps.  Your individual is a Red Footed Cannibalfly,
Promachus rufipes, a species that begins to make a regular appearance among our identification requests beginning in June, and continuing through the hot summer months.  The Red Footed Cannibalfly is also called a Bee Panther.

Subject: Bug found by river in Indiana
Location: Bristol, Indiana
June 13, 2016 5:42 pm
We found this bug while walking by the river in Bristol, Indiana.
Signature: Bliss Family

Male Dobsonfly

Male Dobsonfly

Dear Bliss Family,
This is an awesome image of a male Dobsonfly, and we believe his mandibles are so white because he recently metamorphosed and that they will soon darken, like most of the images we have on our site of male Dobsonflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck?
Location: Nevada County, CA.
June 19, 2016 11:31 am
Found in Nevada County CA. Can you tell me what this freakish thing is?
Signature: Carol Macarty

Male Glowworm

Male Western Banded Glowworm

Dear Carol,
This is an adult male Glowworm Beetle probably the Western Banded Glowworm,
Zarhipis integripennis, which is pictured on BugGuide.  While male Fireflies that flash with bioluminescence as adults signalling to females that respond by flashing back, male Glowworms do not light up and only  larviform female Glowworms glow in the dark to attract a mate.  

Subject: Beautiful mith
Location: Southern California (Hemet)
June 10, 2016 7:45 pm
Found this guy today in Hemet California (Southern, inland desert area). He matched the stucco so well, I almost missed him.
I found the beautiful design of his wings just stunning.
What is he, and what does he look like as a catipillar?
Signature: Teresa DiPietro

Salt Marsh Moth

Salt Marsh Moth

Dear Teresa,
This delicate Tiger Moth is a Salt Marsh Moth,
Estigmene acrea.  The caterpillar is one of the Woolly Bears, and we believe this Woolly Bear is a Salt Marsh Moth Caterpillar.  According to BugGuide:  “Adult (imago): forewing white with about 20 small black spots scattered across the disk, and 5 larger black spots spaced along the costa. Males have dark yellow hindwings, those of females are mostly white (with 3 or 4 black blotches in both sexes).  Larva (caterpillar): highly variable, blond to brown to black, with long bristly hairs standing upright in dense tufts from orange or black tubercles; hairs longer at both ends of body, especially toward the rear end. Spiracles white. Moves very rapidly. Face mainly black with yellow down the center.”  Since your individual has white hindwings, she is a female.

Subject: Bugs on crape myrtle
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
June 11, 2016 8:48 am
Can you tell me what this is? Just noticed while cutting grass.
Signature: Cody

Tree Cattle

Tree Cattle

Dear Cody,
These are Barklice or Tree Cattle.  They are benign creatures that do not harm the tree as they feed on lichens that frequently grow on older trees.  Your image contains mostly striped nymphs, though if you look closely, you will see a few winged adults.