Subject:  unknown “caterpillar”
Geographic location of the bug:  Buda, Tx (between Austin & San Marcos)
Date: 06/06/2019
Time: 06:19 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  It was walking across sidewalk underneath Elm trees.  White stripes were new to me.  Prob going to find its common!
How you want your letter signed:  Mike Cato

Hornless Hornworm: Eumorpha species

Dear Mike,
This is the caterpillar of a moth in the family Sphingidae, and most caterpillars in the family have caudal horns, and they are known as Hornworms.  There are several genera that have most if not all species shedding the horn as the caterpillar grows.  Your hornless Hornworm is in the genus
Eumorpha, but we are not certain of the species.  It might be the Satellite Sphinx, pictured on BugGuide, or it might be the Vine Sphinx, also pictured on BugGuide.  We will attempt to contact Bill Oehlke to get his opinion, and it is possible that frequent contributor to our site, Bostjan Dvorak, will recognize it and provide a comment.

Facebook Posting from James Lee Phillips:  “I’m really sad for the hornless hornworms. They deserve a less existentialist taxonomy.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Beetle Identification
Geographic location of the bug:  Assam, India
Date: 06/06/2019
Time: 02:12 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman: 
I saw this beetle on a moss-covered rock while birding. It looks like a Trilobite Beetle. I would like to know the species.
How you want your letter signed:  Leons Mathew

Firefly Larva, we believe

Dear Leons,
This is a Beetle larva, which might make exact identification difficult if not impossible.  We believe this is a Firefly larva, but we would not rule out that it might be a Net-Winged Beetle larva.  According to Eric Eaton, if you watch it eat a snail or slug, it is definitely a Firefly larva.

Subject:  North East Mexico Plague
Geographic location of the bug:  Monterrey
Date: 06/07/2019
Time: 12:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Worried about our forest, infestation of this insect. What is it what is the impact. Millions of these in our forest.
How you want your letter signed:  Raul

Katydid: Pterophylla beltrani

Dear Raul,
This is a gorgeous Katydid, and with a little searching, we are confident we have identified it as
Pterophylla beltrani  thanks to images and maps on iNaturalist.  We located an article entitled Geographic Distribution and Singing Activity of Pterophylla beltrani and P. robertsi (Orthoptera:  Tettigoniidae), Under Field Conditions where it states:  “Pterophylla beltrani, locally known as grilleta or false locust, constitutes an important forest pest in northern Mexico.  Populations of this species began to increase … in 1975.”  Since this is a native, local insect for you, we have a problem thinking of the large numbers you witnessed this year as an infestation.  Rather, we prefer to think about it as a possible indication of climate change.  Some species might not survive a change in climate while others may thrive.  At this point in time, Green New Deal or not, we believe that there has already been an irreversible effect on nature due to the changes, climactic and otherwise, that increasing populations of humans on planet Earth have created.  That stated, no one knows what the future will bring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Ant Queen Shedding Her Wings
Geographic location of the bug:  Missouri, USA
Date: 06/05/2019
Time: 08:17 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I’ve seen plenty of queens but never found one in the process of leaving her wings behind! I thought you might like to see. sadly my video didn’t turn out well, but I got these pictures of her that aren’t too bad. (my camera isn’t made for macro, sorry!)
How you want your letter signed:  Michael

Carpenter Ant Queen

Dear Michael,
Thanks so much for sending your image of a female Carpenter Ant shedding her wings.

 

Subject:  Found multiple of the same type of Bug in pond.  What is it?
Geographic location of the bug:  Massachusetts
Date: 06/05/2019
Time: 07:57 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Found this in the pond in my backyard, no idea what it is.
How you want your letter signed:  Alexander

Water Tiger

Dear Alexander,
These are Water Tigers, the predatory larvae of a Predaceous Diving Beetle in the family Dytiscidae.

Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  VERONA, PA
Date: 06/04/2019
Time: 01:19 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  My first Luna Moth sighting of the year! On the wall at work tonight!
How you want your letter signed:  Rhiannon

Luna Moth

Dear Rhiannon,
Thanks for your comment and your submission.  How marvelous that this was your first Luna Moth sighting of the year, indicating that you have had sightings in years past.  Many of our readers, even those who live within the range of the Luna Moth, are never fortunate enough to experience a sighting of this glorious insect.  Alas, the artificial light under which this image occurred has desaturated the lovely green color of the Luna Moth.