Subject:  biting swimmer in pool
Geographic location of the bug:  Queen Creek, AZ
Date: 06/08/2019
Time: 04:38 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We have found this type of bug in our Arizona pool (more than once). It swims very fast, it is not a water boatman, the legs are different and all go the same direction. Also it swims belly down. It has 6 legs, 2 small antennae, and it appears to use a bubble on its underside to help it go up to the surface and down again. It also bites (or stings), and if a person is in the pool nearby, it will make a beeline for them. Very aggressive for a little creature. (the 3rd photo is not 2 bugs, but a reflection on the side of the glass it was in).
Nobody seems to be able to identify it. Thank you in advance for your help!
How you want your letter signed:  Zonie Girl

Water Scavenger Beetle

Dear Zonie Girl,
Thank you for pointing out and for having documentary images showing the position of the legs while swimming.  The is a Beetle, and based on information on BugGuide, including “Aquatic forms may superficially resemble Dysticidae but can be easily distinguished by antennae. Many have keeled sterna. The adults come up for air head first, and move hind legs alternately (Dysticidae come up for air tail first and move hind legs together, like oars)”, we conclude this is a Water Scavenger Beetle in the family Hydrophilidae.  Though the bite might be an annoyance, we do not believe it poses any threat to humans.

Water Scavenger Beetle

Thank you for the quick response! I looked these up online, and yes, that is exactly what this bug is.

Water Scavenger Beetle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bug on my strawberries
Geographic location of the bug:  Bethlehem Pennsylvania
Date: 06/08/2019
Time: 12:39 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this? All over my plant
How you want your letter signed:  Sandy

Spotted Lanternfly Nymph

Dear Sandy,
We regret that we bear bad news.  This is an immature Spotted Lanternfly,
Lycorma delicatula, an invasive exotic species from Asia that is spreading in and beyond Pennsylvania since its recent introduction in 2014.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to China, India, Japan and Vietnam; invasive in Korea and in our area(1). Currently (2018) known from 6 counties in PA; also found in DE, NY, VA.” 

Thank you for this information.  A neighbor had to take down a tree last summer from these pests.  They were all over the area. I had called a hotline number and they were aware they were in our area. Not sure what is being done. I kill them when I see one.
Thanks again.

Subject:  I am trying to care for this little friend and I have no idea what he is..
Geographic location of the bug:  New Hampshire
Date: 06/07/2019
Time: 08:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I thought he was an inchworm but.. when I Google ‘inchworm’, I cant find any like him. Please help, it would be super appreciated!!
How you want your letter signed:  Not sure what this means.. whichever way you’d like, I guess

Sawfly Larva

This is NOT an Inchworm, nor is it another species of Caterpillar.  This is the larva of a Sawfly, a non-stinging relative of Bees and Wasps.  It closely resembles the Roseslug, Endelomyia aethiops, pictured on Ecological Landscape Alliance where it states:  “During the months of May and June in the Northeast you may have noticed leaf discoloration in the form of blotches on your rose leaves (Figure 1). If you inspect the leaves closely you will see the culprit! It is a small, narrow bodied larva called the roseslug sawfly, an introduced pest from Europe. The larvae have pale green colored bodies and light tan-orange colored heads.”  Here is a BugGuide image.  The best way to care for this Sawfly larva is to feed it leaves from the plant upon which it was found.

Sawfly Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bright orange fly
Geographic location of the bug:  Netherlands
Date: 06/08/2019
Time: 12:31 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there,
I came across this fly a few days ago in urban woodland in Groningen, Northern Netherlands. It looked like a bright orange meat fly to my inexpert eye. I’ve never seen anything like it before. It was about six to eight millimetres long and was sitting on vegetation following light rain at around 8am. I would love to know what it is!
Best wishes, thanks for any ideas!
How you want your letter signed:  Mick

Muscid Fly

Dear Mick,
This is surely a distinctive looking Fly, and the one thing of which we were certain before beginning any research is that the closely spaced eyes indicates it is a male Fly.  Since the UK has an extensive selection of insect identification sites, we tried searching the web for orange flies from the UK, and we discovered
Phaonia pallida pictured on the Adur Flies site.  Wikipedia places it in the family Muscidae with House Flies.  According to NatureSpot:  “Often seen in woodland” and “Larvae are associated with fungi and rotten wood.” 

Muscid Fly

Subject:  Fly?
Geographic location of the bug:  Scottsdale ,AZ
Date: 06/07/2019
Time: 03:27 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I was in my car at lunch June 7th, at noon, with my windows open and it was about 95 degrees out. This fly looking thing flew into my car and perched itself right above my head. It was mostly beige and brown kind of resembled a bee but looked more like a fly. To me it looked like it had a very pretty pattern. The more detailed photo in unretouched, the close up color is enhanced to look more like what I saw rather than what the camera saw.
How you want your letter signed:  Alison O’Konski

Hover Fly

Dear Alison,
This is a harmless Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many non-stinging members of this family mimic the colors and markings of stinging Bees and Wasps as a defense against predators.  We matched your image to an image of
Copestylum apiciferum on the Natural History of Orange County site and we verified that identification on BugGuide where the range map incudes Arizona.

Subject:  This Thing Looks Like Flying Death
Geographic location of the bug:  Chapel Hill NC US
Date: 06/07/2019
Time: 03:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi! I have lived here my whole life and have never seen anything like this. From a distance I thought it was a brown praying mantis or a huge leaf insect/moth, but it is not and I Am Scared. Thanks!!
How you want your letter signed:  Liz C

Female Dobsonfly

Dear Liz,
This is a female Dobsonfly, and though her mandibles might produce a painful pinch, she is harmless.  In the interest of your mental well-being and your ability to sleep peacefully at night, we believe you should be thankful you did not encounter a male Dobsonfly, though his mandibles are all for show.